KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

YOU comma Idiot

– tekijä: Doug Harris

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
4413450,079 (3.58)22
Winner, Quiddity Award for Best Book Trailer Shortlisted, Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction and QWF First Book Prize "You're the kind of guy who falls in love after one date." Marginalized and alienated, perennial fuck-up Lee Goodstone is a resounding zero: a low-rent hash-dealer with delusions of inadequacy. He's content to while away the hours of his life drinking, smoking, hanging out, playing the occasional game of hockey, and generally ignoring the world outside his tiny neighbourhood. But Lee's near-idyllic existence is about to grind into second gear. His friend Henry has been accused of kidnapping and Lee's been cornered by the local media. Another friend has decided to shoehorn his way into Lee's drug business. And he's just made it with his best friend's girlfriend. Clearly, Lee needs a Plan B -- not easy for a guy who long ago decided that the correct plan of action is to have no plan at all. A hip, comedic novel, Doug Harris's YOU comma Idiotis a dark, demented, deeply delightful excursion into youthful alienation and ennui.… (lisätietoja)
-
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 22 mainintaa

Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 13) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Not only does Goose Lane release some of the best literature this country is capable of (see: this year's wholly remarkable quartet of The Town that Drowned, The Time We All Went Marching, Tide Road, and Kalila), but last year's YOU comma Idiot is one of the best, and my favourite novel of 2010. Writing in the second person, a format only off-putting for the first paragraph, Doug Harris' tale of a low-level drug dealer eking out his existence in Montreal by doing as little as humanly possible is a treat on every level. His dialogue is the highlight, as crunchy as Elmore Leonard and quick-witted as Nick Hornby, but his empathy for character and his sharpness in motivation and plotting keeps the novel humming. So sure of itself, so fleet-footed yet grounded, it is hard to believe this is a debut novel. It's as entertaining as anything out there, better written than most, and it's lack of presence on major awards lists is a devastating oversight by people who cannot comprehend that just because it's funny, that doesn't mean it's undeserving of attention.

Read the full review here. ( )
  ShelfMonkey | Sep 29, 2011 |
Tämä arvostelu kirjoitettiin LibraryThingin Varhaisia arvostelijoita varten.
It took me a long time and several attempts to get into this book. The first chapter is very choppy and disconnected, but unlike my initial fear, the style doesn't continue in such a staccato rhythm for the rest of the book.

I found myself getting drawn into the story of the characters as they unfolded, despite the backdrop of drugs that I don't relate to. I'm not quite finished yet, but I'm excited to see how the underlying "mystery" unfolds.

I just finished and I have to admit I had trouble putting this book down. While there were elements of the story that were very one dimensional and far fetched (I'm thinking of his "bank"), they were out weighed by moments that completely captured me. It's been a while since reading a passage and actually feeling like the moment was totally authentic. There were many elements that I thought completely captured the characters feelings.

Despite my initial hesitation to getting into this book, once I did I was completely hooked! ( )
  jdarling29 | May 11, 2011 |
Tämä arvostelu kirjoitettiin LibraryThingin Varhaisia arvostelijoita varten.
Full review:

http://readingthroughlife.ca/you-comma-idiot-review/

Short excerpt:

Now, I'm not exactly saying that this is a high-energy, action-packed adventure story (because it's not), but I found myself more and more engrossed in the story the farther along I got. Harris writes with just enough of that "Canadian" feel for me to enjoy reading about his characters and what they go through, but it also has a bit of a darker, more contemporary feel.
  readingthroughlife | Feb 10, 2011 |
Although not my usual style of novel, I quite enjoyed YOU comma IDIOT. Usually I’d summarize the book in my own words here, but the blurb from the back of the book does a pretty good job of describing the plot. The story is very much Lee’s life. Told from a first person POV that utilizes ‘you’ instead of ‘I’, the reader is sucked in to the ins and outs of Lee’s slowly wasting away adulthood. And Lee himself? What a character. A genuine normal guy (albeit one who sells drugs, is a handyman in a renovated warehouse turned apartment and sleeps with his best friend’s girl), Lee has a very pragmatic and sometimes cynical outlook on life. He’s incredibly harsh on himself, doesn’t always make the right decisions and skirts the law, but he’s a good guy.

While I may not have completely loved the book (though it’s a good story), I did love Doug Harris’ writing style. I can tell you right now, it was his prose and writing style that kept me sucked in and reading. It’s an incredibly well written novel, with smooth prose (even with some shorter sentences), good description, emotion and pacing, and has a very real and raw feel about it. The mystery surrounding Henry and the missing girl was done wonderfully, Lee’s emotions about Honey – his best friend’s girl – and his decisions regarding selling drugs and maybe getting a job come across loud and clear. YOU comma IDIOT is a book about life choices, events and the hassles of bad decisions. ( )
  thekams | Nov 22, 2010 |
Tämä arvostelu kirjoitettiin LibraryThingin Varhaisia arvostelijoita varten.
You comma Idiot is, in short, the story of Lee Goodstone, small-time drug dealer and general layabout. One of his friends stands accused of murdering a 17-year-old girl, a rival is horning in on his drug business, and he has just inadvertently slept with his best friend's girlfriend, by which I mean to say that, while he can't claim the idea wasn't entirely his, at least he wasn't the instigator. Complications, understandably, ensue.

All this is given to us in the second person, a tricky gambit. Some reviewers have complained that the second-person litany of Lee Goodstone's faults alienates the reader; no reader likes to be informed, page in and page out, that he is an idiot. But this misses the point. Second person narration does not, obviously, seek to tell us about ourselves; it's a rhetorical device a narrator employs to persuade us to take a certain perspective on the viewpoint character. And this, in turn, may raise the question of just who is narrating, and why. It gets complicated.

You gotta be ambitious to try it, in other words. And to begin that attempt by calling out the best-known second-person narrative, that staple of creative writing texts, Jay McInerney's Bright Lights, Big City ... well, you gotta have guts.

Both You comma Idiot and Bright Lights, Big City feature protagonists who dabble with drugs -- and won't leave home without their sunglasses. But Harris is the bizarro-McInerney. McInerney's characters are glamorous, while Harris's are losers. McInerney's narrator loses his wife; Lee Goodstone takes up with a woman who has left her boyfriend. And in what is surely not a coincidence, McInerney begins his novel by telling us what kind of guy his protagonist is not, while Harris takes great pains to tell us what kind of guy Goodstone is. Those reviewers who complain that Harris alienates the reader are missing the point.

Jay McInerney opens by making excuses: "You are not the kind of guy who would be at a place like this at this time of the morning. But here you are...." McInerney's narrator argues that his character is better than this, that he doesn't belong here, that this is not really him. Harris does precisely the opposite. "You're the kind of guy who falls in love after one date," he declares. "You're the kind of guy who rehearses a conversation fifty times in his head and then blows it when it's for real. You're the kind of guy who...." And so on, and so on, and so forth, and so on: Harris devotes his entire opening chapter to ensuring that we know precisely what kind of a guy Lee Goodstone is, and the portrait isn't pretty.

If McInerney's narrator argues for absolution, Harris's portrays a toxic self-loathing. But despite the litany of condemnation, Goodstone soon emerges through his actions as no idiot at all, especially when compared with the company he keeps. He simply doesn't have faith that he can be anything more than what he is.

And this is where the problem lies: the novel, in a sense, seems to lack the faith that it can be more than what it is. The characters don't emerge as fully formed; Harris seems content to leave most of them flat. Goodstone is so averse to taking himself seriously, and so singularly lacking in ambition, that he rarely emerges as anything more than a comic figure. Harris is a more subtle writer than he seems to be, as when Goodstone watches a child, still out playing after all the others have been called it; we're given to understand that he could be watching himself, that he must either eventually go in, or exist forever as a kind of Peter Pan of the streets. But Harris continually undermines these effects by playing for the quick laugh, a laugh that is, unfortunately, sometimes forced. You comma Idiot seems not to be able to decide whether to be a purely comic novel, and so falls short of its promise.
1 ääni ajsomerset | Oct 21, 2010 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 13) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
The funniest moments in the book – and the book is consistently funny – involves Lee’s eccentric dealer, a brilliantly sketched man you can picture being played by Philip Seymour Hoffman in a film version. The shifting power dynamics that play out between the two as their professional relationship erodes is a rollicking B-story.
 
YOU comma Idiot is a well-written book by a talented writer, and both are more entertaining and relevant than any of the books that won Canadian literary prizes in 2010 or their authors. Harris’ characters are more nuanced and authentic than you’ll find in the prize winners, and what they’re about—the vast demographic of the young-and-demoralized at the bottom of urban Canada’s dogpile—is, page-by-page more quickening and alert and uncomfortable. It’s a book full of surprises, some of them uncomfortable, a few uplifting, none plot-driven or arbitrary, and there’s absolutely no navel lint clouding the view.
 
I have long been a sucker for the sort of fiction that might be known as lad lit, unless there was a better name for it, which there is not. To be honest, though, Doug Harris’ You Comma Idiot did not necessarily hit me as such when I first picked it up. In fact, I wasn’t quite sure just what it was. I knew only one thing: I couldn’t put it down. Small-time Montreal drug pusher Lee Goodstone is the idiot that title refers to. Lee is coasting along slacker-drug-pusher style when a series of events pushes his life into a higher gear than he’s entirely comfortable with. Debut author Doug Harris is a filmmaker and maybe some of that cinematic mojo shows up in You Comma Idiot, a book which seems long on both visuals and dialogue. But Harris’ approach to novel writing, while novel is also very tight. You don’t always know where you’re going, but the ride is a whole lot of fun.
 
Debuting novelist Doug Harris has crafted a whippet-quick, greasy read in You Comma Idiot, and it starts with a believable group of characters — Johnny’s older brothers, who are big on the club scene; Baby, Honey’s listless sister; Your Dealer, a drug kingpin given to philosophical ranting; single mom Stacey and son Zach (or “Ack!” to Lee); and a low-rent posse intent on leaning in on Lee’s hash dealing. The author also does a splendid job in depicting in minute detail the fading jewel that is Montreal. In fact, he’s to Montreal what novelist Russell Smith (How Insensitive, Girl Crazy) is to Toronto and Gordon Leenders (To Be Continued …) is to Hamilton: a clever wordsmith/observer of the underengaged and slothful.
 
The novel is written in second person, which initially makes for an alarming read. It feels like you’re being yelled at.

But eventually you adjust to it and realize that Harris is probably a genius for writing his novel this way.

By literally being inside Lee’s head and hearing all of the horrible and hilariously offensive things he says about himself and other people, you develop a relationship with the character that reaches a level of intimacy rarely established even in first person novels.

Harris’s decision to differ his style of narrative is the reason this book will resonate with an audience of this generation.

You, as the reader, end up cheering on this pathetic little man who has never really done anything with his life because if you don’t, you’ll lose hope for yourself too.

The book reads like man-lit (chick literature for dudes), but women can still identify with many of the themes in the book regardless of its male focus (especially if they smoke hash and have irresponsible friends).
 
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
For William, and in memory of Gary
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
You're the kind of guy who falls in love after one date.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
You’re the kind of guy who ends up alone. You’re the kind of guy who will never win the lottery. You’re the kind of guy who leads off the ninth with a base hit but then gets nailed trying to stretch it into a double. You’re the kind of guy who needs a Plan B.
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kirjan kehujat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen kieli
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

Winner, Quiddity Award for Best Book Trailer Shortlisted, Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction and QWF First Book Prize "You're the kind of guy who falls in love after one date." Marginalized and alienated, perennial fuck-up Lee Goodstone is a resounding zero: a low-rent hash-dealer with delusions of inadequacy. He's content to while away the hours of his life drinking, smoking, hanging out, playing the occasional game of hockey, and generally ignoring the world outside his tiny neighbourhood. But Lee's near-idyllic existence is about to grind into second gear. His friend Henry has been accused of kidnapping and Lee's been cornered by the local media. Another friend has decided to shoehorn his way into Lee's drug business. And he's just made it with his best friend's girlfriend. Clearly, Lee needs a Plan B -- not easy for a guy who long ago decided that the correct plan of action is to have no plan at all. A hip, comedic novel, Doug Harris's YOU comma Idiotis a dark, demented, deeply delightful excursion into youthful alienation and ennui.

No library descriptions found.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Doug Harris's book YOU comma Idiot was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Pikalinkit

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.58)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 3
3.5 1
4 4
4.5 1
5 2

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 157,735,205 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä