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A Single Man – tekijä: Christopher…
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A Single Man (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1964; vuoden 2013 painos)

– tekijä: Christopher Isherwood (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,821706,924 (4.04)90
When A Single Man was originally published, it shocked many by its frank, sympathetic, and moving portrayal of a gay man in midlife. George, the protagonist, is adjusting to life on his own after the sudden death of his partner, and determines to persist in the routines of his daily life; the course of A Single Man spans twenty-four hours in an ordinary day. An Englishman and a professor living in suburban Southern California, he is an outsider in every way, and his internal reflections and interactions with others reveal a man who loves being alive despite everyday injustices and loneliness. Wry, suddenly manic, constantly funny, surprisingly sad, this novel catches the texture of life itself.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Daniel91
Teoksen nimi:A Single Man
Kirjailijat:Christopher Isherwood (Tekijä)
Info:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (2013), Edition: Reprint, 192 pages
Kokoelmat:Fiction
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:England, Novel

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

A Single Man (tekijä: Christopher Isherwood) (1964)

  1. 10
    After Many a Summer Dies the Swan (tekijä: Aldous Huxley) (SnootyBaronet)
    SnootyBaronet: The protagonist of "A Single Man" discusses "After Many A Summer" with his students.
  2. 00
    Trans-Sister Radio (tekijä: Chris Bohjalian) (FFortuna)
  3. 11
    Häpeäpaalu (tekijä: J. M. Coetzee) (chrisharpe)
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englanti (69)  italia (1)  Kaikki kielet (70)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 70) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Grief doesn’t disappear, it only dulls. And in its persistent pull, we learn not to crush it but to hold it, transform it, cope with it in a cascading myriad of ways. Although it doesn’t always work we soon learn to live with it a little better each time it reappears as it captures us in its rough, clammy arms. Isherwood communicates a moving understanding of loss in A Single Man. Emptiness though subdued is very much felt in the novel where the monotony of the daily creeps on the life of someone who wakes up each day faced by his lover's eventual mortality. As memories enhance the aftermath of death and enduring through the comfort of books, the forgetfulness brought by a mind occupied by work doesn't seem to fill the void for the sake of filling it, there is an utter need to connect if only to make loneliness a bit bearable. Not only to connect again with the departed through objects they used to touch and people they used to know (even if this person was someone they cheated you on with) but to also pour one's self to someone new. But a kind of restraint traps because of how homosexuality can make the chance to completely mourn and share its agony difficult. Whilst the tenderness and affection that lingers from the space left by someone is heartbreakingly embraced by the prose of A Single Man, I find it dated; its depiction of female characters questionable. Rare times like this, I would be brave enough to say the film is better than the book which also includes this line in the script: "You know the only thing that has made the whole thing worthwhile has been those few times that I was able to truly connect with another person." ( )
  lethalmauve | Jan 25, 2021 |
A SINGLE MAN offers a succinct and vivid portrayal of one day in the life of a single man's depression.

Unfortunately, this successful writing of nearly unrelieved depressing reading interwoven with the horrors of living in Los Angeles
is enough to depress the jeebers out of many of us.

The man's split person is early revealed as "... am-now-I-here..." = "it" - = a "live dying creature"
vs his role
presented to the public world as simply newly single "George."
For reasons not developed, he stays obedient to other's expectations.

The author's description of the shift from "... am ..." to "UP" will likely affect many reader's own perceptions of their own rising sequence.

On the downside, once a reader has acknowledged the force of the writing about a major depressive state,
is the killing of ant for no reason and the way over done digestive and bodily functions, from pyloric spasms on up really necessary?

Worse still (after the plot has thankfully quickened from breakfast to being old and "merging into traffic"),
a horrible interlude of imagined torture pretty much ruins the plot and character. ( )
  m.belljackson | Jan 18, 2021 |
In which a European in exile in 1964 manages to accurately convey the inner workings of those of us Antipodeans in 2012.

I've not yet seen the (apparently wonderful) film based on this book, which was probably a blessing, as I was able to approach it uninitiated. In a scant 150 pages, Isherwood details one mundane-yet-important day in the life of an English professor in the U.S. Digging deftly to the root of George's mind, Isherwood captures his moments of intelligence and pain, of arrogance, lust, self-loathing, confusion, alienation, connection, nostalgia, heartbreak, discovery. It's a taut little character study, which approaches a variety of '60s counter-culture/neo-romantic issues (social alienation, the rise of that loathsome word 'tolerance', man-made boundaries preventing connection), yet - because his focus is so clearly on George's character - Isherwood avoids that painfully on-the-nose attitude that so dates other writers of the era (if I cough Kerouac's name out of the corner of my mouth, will a thousand hipsters descend upon my house with torches and pitchforks?).

A beautiful little work. It worries me somewhat that I feel Isherwood has here predicted my future. And if not, all the better: he has allowed me an insight into a genuine mind. A complete human being laid bare in 150 pages. Perhaps the moral is to invite your neighbours over to dinner more often. Perhaps it's simply to say "yes" when asked. Or perhaps it is that we cannot expect any more. It's not the dinner, or the asking, or what we say when we're there, or even what we mean. It's about washing ourselves free of the rituals in which we drape our lives, or at least of questioning the rituals before we abandon ourselves to them. It's how we remove the past from its pedestal without removing its meaning. It's going forward knowing that, in some ways, everything we have learned is important to us, yet in other ways, we have learned nothing at all. ( )
  therebelprince | Nov 15, 2020 |
Glorious. Published in 1964 and far superior to most things I have read published since. Rich and creative in so many ways. Important messages about human dignity, difference and community. And, nearly 60 years later, also politically relevant in so many ways - especially in its critiques of liberalism:

Here is my brother's liberal voice about my sexual orientation :
“Nothing here that is wilfully vicious. All is due to heredity, early environment (shame on those possessive mothers, those sex-segregated British schools!), arrested development at puberty, and/or glands. Here we have a misfit, debarred forever from the best things of life, to be pitied, not blamed.”

Here is my sister's liberal voice on the same:
“So let us be understanding, shall we, and remember that, after all, there were the Greeks (though that was a bit different, because they were pagans rather than neurotics). Let us even go so far as to say that this kind of relationship can sometimes be almost beautiful - particularly if one of the parties is already dead; or, better yet, both. How dearly Mrs. Strunk would enjoy being sad about Jim."

Here is my voice, trying to reason and explain with an 'ignorant'-liberal disguise for what is really only a choice to enjoy the pleasure keeping others below:
“…but your book is wrong, Mrs. Strunk, says George, when it tells you that Jim is the substitute I found for a real son, a real kid brother, a real husband, a real wife. Jim wasn’t a substitute for anything. And there is no substitute for Jim, if you’ll forgive me saying so, anywhere.”

Here is a progressive argument against the liberal politics of civility and for the right of the oppressed to express anger:
“Do you think it makes people nasty to be loved? You know it doesn’t! Then why should it make them nice to be loathed? While you’re being persecuted, you hate what’s happening to you, you hate the people who are making it happen; you’re in a world of hate. Why, you wouldn’t recognise love if you met it!”

Here is Bernie Sanders' voice calling for a multi-racial working class coalition:
“Mexicans live here, so there are lots of flowers. Negroes live here, so it is cheerful. George would not care to live here, because they all blast all day long with their radios and television sets. But he would never find himself yelling at their children; because these people are not The Enemy. If they would ever accept George, they might even be allies.”

Here is an argument against liberal "color-blindness" in the USA, and against continental Europe's, and especially France's, refusal to collect race-based socio-economic data because under liberalism all citizens are supposedly equal:
“What’s so phoney nowadays is all this familiarity. Pretending there isn’t any difference between people - well, like you were saying about minorities, this morning. If you and I are no different, what do we have to give each other? How can we ever be friends?"

He writes on the intellectual bankruptcy and socially corrupting force of capitalism: “What’s the use of knowing something if you don’t make money out of it? And the glum ones more than half agree with him, and feel privately ashamed of not being smart and crooked.”

And on the boredom of American culture, as it channels everything through marketing mediums of symbolic value:
“We sleep in symbolic bedrooms, eat symbolic meals, are symbolically entertained.”

An English writer in America, writing a story set in America, he has all the same a very European sensibility: emphasising, as Europeans do, that what makes us human is our sensuality, our material physicality, our sexuality; as opposed to the American idea that “goodness” as symbolised through perfunctory care of cats or dogs is what makes us human (cf. Save The Cat).

Isherwood complains (in 1964!) about cookie-cutter houses sold a "homes" and "New Concept Living” - a trick developers are still using 60 years later! He complains about gentrification kicking all the Bohemians out and replacing them with rigid thinking families and rigid behavioural restrictions. He complains about IBM computers and ID cards - the power of technology to define and limit one's human identity.

Here he is about the Russians, but he could equally well be talking about the muslims:
"the basic American dogma, that it is, always, a Good Morning. Good, despite the Russians and their rockets, and all the ills and worries of the flesh. For, of course, we know, don't we, that the Russians and the worries are not really real? They can be unthought and made to vanish. And therefore the morning can be made to be good. Very well then, it is good."

Isherwood even, slyly, slips in a comment about Palestine, describing viewing California as “a sad Jewish prophet of doom” and being “oppressed by awareness of the city below. On both sides of the hills, to the north and to the south, it has spawned and spread itself over the entire plain. It has eaten up the wide pastures and ranchlands, and the last stretches of orange grove; it has sucked out the surrounding lakes and sapped the forests of the high mountains. Soon it will be drinking converted sea water. And yet it will die. No need for rockets to wreck it, or another ice age to freeze it, or a huge earthquake to crack it off and dump it in the [Pacific]. It will die of over-extension. It will die because its tap-roots have dried up; the brashness and greed which have been its only strength. And the desert, which is the natural condition of this country, will return.”

Chistopher Isherwood does so so very much with this tiny little novelette - and does it so pleasurably, so poignantly. No wonder it is a classic. ( )
  GeorgeHunter | Sep 13, 2020 |
Meet more-or-less George
embittered by secret loss
maintain that stiff lip. ( )
  Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 70) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
The remarkable thing about this book is that it starts off by looking like his most resounding failure so far, then gradually gets the reader involved until he is laughing, slapping his thigh, and experiencing the sensation described by Holden Caulfield - the desire to snatch up a pen and write the novelist a letter...

What comes over, like a spring breeze, is George’s essential sweetness - and Christopher Isherwood’s own essential goodness and kindness. This is no sour, nihilistic lament of a middle-aged man. It has humour - not even ‘wry’ humour, but the sunny humour of a man who is at peace with himself. When George daydreams about kidnapping the members of the local Purity League and forcing them to act in pornographic movies, the writing has an unexpected touch of Kingsley Amis.
lisäsi SnootyBaronet | muokkaaTwentieth Century Literature, Colin Wilson (Oct 1, 1976)
 

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (31 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Isherwood, Christopherensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Bachardy, DonKansikuvataiteilijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Brockway, James.Kääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
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Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
TO GORE VIDAL
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Waking up begins with saying am and now.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
These books have not made George nobler or better or more truly wise. It is just that he likes listening to their voices, the one or the other, acording to his mood. He misuses them quite ruthlessly - despite the respectful way he has to talk about them in public - to put him to bed, to take his mind off the hands of the clock, to relax the nagging of his pyloric spasm, to gossip him out of his melancholy, to trigger the conditioned reflexes of his colon.
George picks it up, saying, “Let’s see if that old robot’ll know the difference,” and pretends to be about to punch another slit in the card. The girl laughs, but only after a split-second look of sheer terror; and the laugh itself is forced. George has uttered blasphemy.
He starts across the largish open space which is the midst of the campus, surrounded by the Art Building, the gymnasium, the Science Building and the Administration Building, and newly planted with grass and some hopeful little trees which should make it leafy and shadowy and pleasant within a few years: that is to say, about the time when they start tearing the whole place apart again.
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Please be careful not to combine the film with the book. Thank you.
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Canonical DDC/MDS

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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

When A Single Man was originally published, it shocked many by its frank, sympathetic, and moving portrayal of a gay man in midlife. George, the protagonist, is adjusting to life on his own after the sudden death of his partner, and determines to persist in the routines of his daily life; the course of A Single Man spans twenty-four hours in an ordinary day. An Englishman and a professor living in suburban Southern California, he is an outsider in every way, and his internal reflections and interactions with others reveal a man who loves being alive despite everyday injustices and loneliness. Wry, suddenly manic, constantly funny, surprisingly sad, this novel catches the texture of life itself.

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