KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

Cabeza de Vaca's Adventures in the Unknown Interior of America (1542)

– tekijä: Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
8271519,492 (3.75)19
Castaways (or Naufragios) is the first major narrative of the exploration of North America by Europeans (1528-1536). It is also an enthralling story of adventure and survival against unimaginable odds. Its author, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, a fortune-seeking sixteenth-century Spanish nobleman, was the treasurer of an expedition to claim for the Spanish Crown a vast area that includes today's Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. A shipwreck forced him and a handful of men to make the long journey to the West coast, where they would meet up with Hernan Cortes, on foot. They endured unspeakable hardships, some of them surviving only by eating the dead. Others, including Cabeza de Vaca joined native peoples he met along the way, learning their languages and practices, and serving them as a slave and later as a physician. When after eight years he finally reached the West, he was not recognized by his compatriots. Cabeza de Vaca displays great interest in the cultures - so alien to his own - of the native peoples he encountered on his odyssey, observing their customs and belief systems with a degree of sophistication and sensitivity unusual in the conquistador. As he forged intimate bonds with some of them, sharing their brutal living conditions and curing their sick, he found himself on a voyage of self-discovery that was to make his reunion with his fellow Spaniards less joyful than expected. Cabeza de Vaca's narrative is a marvelously gripping story, but it is also much more. It is a first-hand account of sixteenth-century Spanish colonization, of the encounter between the conquistador and the Native American, of the aspirations and fears of exploration. It is a trove of ethnographic information, its descriptions and interpretations of native peoples' cultures making it a powerful precursor to modern anthropology. And it is a masterpiece of exploration writing, its author keenly aware of the fictive thrust that often energizes the writing of history.… (lisätietoja)
-
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 19 mainintaa

englanti (11)  espanja (3)  ranska (1)  Kaikki kielet (15)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 15) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Moi interesante ( )
  acouso | Jan 14, 2021 |
Account of early explorer in the new world ( )
  brianstagner | Sep 19, 2020 |
Cuatro estrellas por las notas del editor Juan Francisco Maura que señalan la hipocresía de Cabeza de Vaca, 2.5 por el libro. ( )
  setmeravelles | Jul 31, 2020 |
There are three things that really struck me about this book.

First, it reads very much like Marco Polo does, simple sentences, slightly formulaic, and little description beyond “the people of this country go naked and have a strange custom”. This is partly because Cabeza de Vaca can’t write Spanish for anything and had to be simplified, and partly because he’s writing a manual and a map, of sorts, for the King of Spain.

Second, it really was one darn thing after another for him, at least how he tells it. First there’s a shipwreck, then they put in at the wrong spot, then they run out of food and have to eat the horses, and then they have to build a boat but don’t know how, and then their new boats get wrecked….

Third, for all that Cabeza de Vaca goes on about the uncivilized peoples he encounters, with their inexplicable customs and tendency to enslave him*, he also talks about how they’re willing to take him in and give him food when they have little, and how the Spanish should work with and accommodate their cultures rather than slaughtering them. (He also seems to be under the impression they thought he was a god most of the time, however.)

I’m still not sure what I think of the book. It’s curious, and an interesting if incomplete look at the American Southwest in the 16th century, but is it good? Would I recommend it? I guess if you’re interested, go for it. It’s a short read.

*It’s hard to tell from the text whether this is true slavery, most of the time, or just “well, you’re here and if we’re going to feed you, you need to contribute.” All the historical background I’ve read says slavery, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the writers were casually racist too.

6/10 ( )
  NinjaMuse | Jul 26, 2020 |
A fascinating read. This version is a translation of Cabeza de Vaca's account, but also lets us know where his account differs from the joint account by the few survivors of the journey. It also recounts some of the details unearthed by Carl Sauer and Cleve Hallenbeck in the 1930s which confirm many of the details in the journal.

The details of how little they ate and still survived amaze me. Not to mention the fact that the tribes would eat mostly one food while it was in season, then move on to the next. I wish the book had included a map to follow his trail. The insights of a person who lived among the various tribes not as a conqueror, but as a slave give perspective. He managed to better his situation by learning the languages of several tribes so that he could act as a go-between and do trading back and forth. In that way he was able to gain a little, and he was on the path most of the time alone, so avoided the beatings which were common. He described many of the customs of the people, which seem bizarre to our materialistic culture, such as that when a tribe brought a healer among their neighbors, they would go and pilfer everything they wanted from the homes, then when the pilfered people took the healer to the next tribe, they would do the same. Since the tribes didn't live in one place long, but constantly moved to find the next food source, I don't imagine there was much to pilfer.

In the end, the four survivors became healers. Not by choice, but because the tribes they were among at the time decided that they were. So, praying for the people, and blowing on them, then making the sign of the cross, they would pray for healing with all their hearts, because if the people were not healed, they would put the healers to death! The people were healed, many times and miraculously, so that these four became a legend. Rather than take advantage of that though, they seem to have grown compassion for the natives. I believe that their own faith was strengthened and refined, or at least Cabeza de Vaca's was. They did use their power to make the tribes take them to the "Christians" further on (down in Mexico), but they made sure that each tribe had food distributed evenly, and that they did not leave one person without a blessing. When they arrived to the place where the "Christians" were, they found that the land was deserted, the natives had fled in terror because they didn't want to be enslaved. Cabeza de Vaca and the others went to the Governor at that place and protested about the treatment and misunderstandings. In this one place, that changed the way the natives were treated. At least until these four men went home to Spain.

In spite of our present feeling about the results of this period of history, I believe it is important to read this sort of first person material to gain perspective. In reading it, it becomes clear how the jumble of history can happen one person at a time through misunderstandings, differing personalities and distant uncomprehending governments with their own agendas. ( )
  MrsLee | Jul 15, 2017 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 15) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (30 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Álvar Núñez Cabeza de VacaTekijäensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Fernández, José B.Kääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Ferrando, RobertoToimittajamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Geers, G.J.Kääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
On the twenty-seventh day of the month of June 1527 Governor Panfilo de Navaez departed from the port of San Lucar de Barramed, with power and mandate from Your Majesty to conquer and govern the provinces that extend from the River of the Palms to the Cape of Florida, which lie on the mainland.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

Castaways (or Naufragios) is the first major narrative of the exploration of North America by Europeans (1528-1536). It is also an enthralling story of adventure and survival against unimaginable odds. Its author, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, a fortune-seeking sixteenth-century Spanish nobleman, was the treasurer of an expedition to claim for the Spanish Crown a vast area that includes today's Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. A shipwreck forced him and a handful of men to make the long journey to the West coast, where they would meet up with Hernan Cortes, on foot. They endured unspeakable hardships, some of them surviving only by eating the dead. Others, including Cabeza de Vaca joined native peoples he met along the way, learning their languages and practices, and serving them as a slave and later as a physician. When after eight years he finally reached the West, he was not recognized by his compatriots. Cabeza de Vaca displays great interest in the cultures - so alien to his own - of the native peoples he encountered on his odyssey, observing their customs and belief systems with a degree of sophistication and sensitivity unusual in the conquistador. As he forged intimate bonds with some of them, sharing their brutal living conditions and curing their sick, he found himself on a voyage of self-discovery that was to make his reunion with his fellow Spaniards less joyful than expected. Cabeza de Vaca's narrative is a marvelously gripping story, but it is also much more. It is a first-hand account of sixteenth-century Spanish colonization, of the encounter between the conquistador and the Native American, of the aspirations and fears of exploration. It is a trove of ethnographic information, its descriptions and interpretations of native peoples' cultures making it a powerful precursor to modern anthropology. And it is a masterpiece of exploration writing, its author keenly aware of the fictive thrust that often energizes the writing of history.

No library descriptions found.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Pikalinkit

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2 7
2.5 4
3 20
3.5 4
4 27
4.5 5
5 18

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 157,656,208 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä