KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

Italian matka päiväkirjoineen

– tekijä: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
9571316,859 (3.85)15
In 1786, when he was already the acknowledged leader of the Sturm und Drang literary movement, Goethe set out on a journey to Italy to fulfil a personal and artistic quest and to find relief from his responsibilities and the agonies of unrequited love. As he travelled to Venice, Rome, Naples and Sicily he wrote many letters, which he later used as the basis for the Italian Journey. A journal full of fascinating observations on art and history, and the plants, landscape and the character of the local people he encountered, this is also a moving account of the psychological crisis from which Goethe emerged newly inspired to write the great works of his mature years.… (lisätietoja)
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 15 mainintaa

englanti (7)  saksa (3)  hollanti (2)  italia (1)  Kaikki kielet (13)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 13) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Italian Journey initially takes the form of a diary, with events and descriptions written up apparently quite soon after they were experienced. The impression is in one sense true, since Goethe was clearly working from journals and letters he composed at the time – and by the end of the book he is openly distinguishing between his old correspondence and what he calls reporting. But there is also a strong and indeed elegant sense of fiction about the whole, a sort of composed immediacy. Goethe said in a letter that the work was "both entirely truthful and a graceful fairy-tale". It had to be something of a fairy-tale, since it was written between thirty and more than forty years after the journey, in 1816 and 1828–29.

The work begins with a famous Latin tag, Et in Arcadia ego, although originally Goethe used the German translation, Auch ich in Arkadien, which alters the meaning. This Latin phrase is usually imagined as spoken by Death – this is its sense, for example, in W. H. Auden's poem called "Et in Arcadia ego" – suggesting that every paradise is afflicted by mortality. Conversely, what Goethe's Auch ich in Arkadien says is "Even I managed to get to paradise", with the implication that we could all get there if we chose. If death is universal, the possibility of paradise might be universal too. This possibility wouldn't preclude its loss, and might even require it, or at least require that some of us should lose it. The book ends with a quotation from Ovid's Tristia, regretting his expulsion from Rome. Cum repeto noctem, Goethe writes in the middle of his own German, as well as citing a whole passage: "When I remember the night..." He is already storing up not only plentiful nostalgia and regret, but also a more complicated treasure: the certainty that he didn't merely imagine the land where others live happily ever after. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Aug 28, 2021 |
The title-page was enough to correct a couple of my misconceptions about this book: I had the idea that this would be the young Goethe backpacking around Italy with the 18th-century equivalent of an Inter-Rail pass, amazed to discover the richness of classical and renaissance art, and rushing his experiences into print to encourage a generation of young poets to do the same. Totally wrong: he was in his late thirties, a famous literary figure and securely established in his ministerial post in Weimar. And he had already spent a lot of time and effort learning about Roman and Italian art in German collections before he set off, and he took with him the works of previous travellers like Winckelmann. So he knew what he was looking at.

Moreover, these travel-diaries weren't prepared for publication until Goethe got to the age where writers are expected to produce memoirs, about thirty years on (the description of the second stay in Rome didn't appear until 1829). Europe had changed quite a bit between 1786 and 1816 - this is probably the ultimate "don't mention the war" book. Goethe obviously did a fair bit of tidying up to prepare it for publication, but at no point does he make any reference (even indirect) to the intervening wars and revolutions. You'd have to be a pretty stony conservative to get away with that. Just imagine someone publishing a travel diary from 1913 in 1946 and pretending that the world was still the same...

Having said that, Goethe is mostly an entertaining travel-companion, because he's interested in absolutely everything from geology and botany to street-cleaning (predictably, he seems to think the last of these is better organised in Germany than Italy...). In Sicily he takes time off from art and architecture to visit the family of a famous bandit; in Naples he parties with Lady Hamilton and an unnamed princess; he climbs Vesuvius and is disappointed not to be able to climb Etna as well. There is a great description of the Roman Carnival, and entertaining looks at street-life in Naples.

Of course the trip is mostly about art, and there's a lot of description of the things he's seen and his reaction to them. Some of this is just lists, and he's often careful not to sound as though he's giving objective critical opinions - at one point he has a rant about "English-style" guidebooks that classify all artworks as good or bad, and have the temerity to point out "faults" in the work of Raphael and Michelangelo. That doesn't stop him giving his own reactions to what he sees, of course, but he doesn't set himself up as anything more than an amateur art-historian.

Sometimes there are interesting glimpses into the practicalities of tourism in the age before photography and electric light - Goethe can sketch reasonably well, but still takes pains to find an artist to travel with him to make sure that he can get a visual record of the things he has seen. And there are descriptions of how the interest of sculptures changes when you get to see them in torchlight.

I was also struck by the difference between Goethe's approach to the Italian Church and what I've seen in travel writings by British writers of the 18th or early 19th century. His comments about what he sees are simply those of a curious, Enlightened observer: he never adopts a partisan position, as British writers would have felt their readers expected them to. Sketching in the Sistine Chapel he enjoys telling us that he took a nap on the Papal throne, but when he is there for an Easter service he is impressed by the pomp and Palestrina.

Fun, and a nice book to dip in and out of, but it's a bit too random and unstructured to read in one go. ( )
  thorold | Nov 13, 2016 |
This review refers to this edition:
Goethe: Italienische Reise Mit einem Anhang: Reisetagebuch für Frau v. Stein
Theodor Friedrich Hrsg.
Philipp Reclam jun. Leipzig 1921
Sonderabdruck des 12. Bandes von Goethes Sämtlichen Werken des Reclam Verlages

Ausführliche Informationen zur Italienischen Reise findet man hier:
http://www.goethezeitportal.de/wissen/projektepool/goethe-italien.html

Ein Vergleich der Beschreibung im Reisetagebuch und in der Italienische Reise ist interessant, z.B.:
Begegnung mit dem Harfnermädchen (7. Sept. 1786):
„Ich schwätzte alles mit ihr durch“(R.Tb.,199) – wird zu: „Ich sprach sehr viel mit ihr durch“ (It.R.,9).
„... und hatte noch viel Spas mit ihr ehe wir schieden.“ (Tgb. 199) – „und wir schieden im besten Humor.“ (It.R.,9). -: die Natürlichere Sprache im Tgb.
Des Mädchens genaue Beobachtungsgabe: Die Harfe als Barometer.

Über sein Versteckspiel als Unbekannter,Tgb, 197, fehlt in der It. R.: „Herder hat wohl Recht zu sagen: daß ich ein groses Kind bin und bleibe, und jetzt ist mir es so wohl daß ich ohngestraft meinem kindischen Wesen folgen kann.“
Aber umgekehrt, ist das Abenteuer mit den Banditen nicht im Tgb. erwähnt. (26. Okt. 1786, 109-110)

Über Sprache (Gesten, Italienisch, Deutsch): „Sie haben gewiße Lieblings Gesten, die ich mir merken will, und überhaupt üb‘ ich mich sie nachzumachen und will euch in dieser Art Geschichten erzählen, wenn ich zurückkomme ob sie gleich mit der Sprache vieles von ihrer Originalität verlieren, ...“ (Tgb., 4. Oktbr. 1786 Abends)

dazu auch:
„So unübersetzlich sind die Eigenheiten jeder Sprache: denn vom höchsten bis zum tiefsten Wort bezieht sich alles auf Eigentümlichkeiten der Nation, es sei nun in Charakter, Gesinnungen oder Zuständen.“ (It.R., 5. Oktbr. 1786 Nachts)

Ausführliche Notizen zum Palazzo Palagonia (9. April 1787) in den Beilagen aus dem Tagebuch (317-18): Elemente der Tollheit des Prinzen Pallagonia nennt Goethe sie, aber Goethe muss doch fasziniert gewesen sein, hätte er sonst so genaue Aufzeichnungen gemacht? Sogar auch ein Grundriß, der zeigt, wo was aufgestellt ist.

Dort auch anschließend Notizen auf der Fahrt durch Sizilien seiner Beobachtungen zu Steinen, dem Erdboden, Anbau, Bettlern, wilden Pflanzen, Tieren, der nicht ganz fertige Zustand des Tempels zu Segeste („Die Gegend ruht in trauriger Fruchtbarkeit. Alles bebaut und fast nicht bewohnt“).

It seems to me impossible to give this work a meaningful rating. (IV-12)
  MeisterPfriem | Apr 9, 2012 |
This review refers to this edition:
Goethes Werke, Zehnter Band, Leipzig: Fr. Wilh. Grunow, 1889

Über seine Motive zur Reise:
12.10.1786: ... wie mir alles wieder lieb wird, was mir von Jugend auf wert war! Wie glücklich ...
Und in dem Brief an Herzog Carl August, 25.1.1788: „Die Hauptabsicht meiner Reise war, mich von den physisch-moralischen Übeln zu heilen, die mich in Deutschland quälten und mich zuletzt unbrauchbar machten, sodann den heißen Durst nach wahrer Kunst zu stillen: das erste ist mir ziemlich, das letzte ganz geglückt.“

Bericht September 1787, vorletzter § (511-12) Kenntnis zu erlangen durch Kreativität, Zweifel ob es ihm gelingt

Neapel (27. Feb. 1787):
Andenken an seinen Vater: man kann von ihm sagen, daß er nie ganz unglücklich werden konnte, weil er sich immer wieder nach Neaple dachte. Ich bin nun nach meiner Art ganz stille und mache nur, wenns gar zu toll wird, große, große Augen.
Aufstieg auf den Vesuv (6. März; 236pp); zum Krater zwischen zwei Eruptionen (in der Zeit nicht ganz gelungen).
Pompeji (11. März 1787): Gedanken über die Aschenwolke – gute Beobachtung und Folgerung daraus – nicht weit vom heutigen Wissen : nuage ardente

über seine eigenen Zeichnungen:
G. vermerkt abfällig über seine eigenen Arbeiten : Kniep zeichnete, ich schemaisierte. (3. April 1787, abends; 287) (Kniep wird erstmals den 19.3. erwähnt)
Ein Jahr später schreibt er: Zur bildenden Kunst bin ich zu alt, ob ich also ein bischen mehr oder weniger pfusche ist eins. (Korrespondenz 9. Feb. 1788; 645)
und: Von meinem längeren Aufenthalt in Rom werde ich den Vorteil haben, daß ich auf das Ausüben der bildenden Kunst Verzicht tue. Aber er fühlt sich in seinem Urteilsvermögen sicherer: ... ich habe schon jetzt meinen Wunsch erreicht: in einer Sache, zu der ich mich leidenschaftlich getragen fühle, nicht mehr blind zu tappen. (23. Feb. 1788, 648)

Palazzo Palagonia (9. April 1787): „Der Prinz Palagonia erlaubt seiner Lust und Leidenschaft zu mißgestaltetem, abgeschmacktem Gebilde den freiesten Lauf, und man zeigt ihm viel zu viel Ehre, wenn man ihm nur einen Funken Einbildungskraft zuschreibt.(299).. geschmacklose Denkart“ (303). (siehe auch hier)

Selbstkritik seiner Urteilsfähigkeit (12. April; 308): Daß ich mich in allgemeine Betrachtungen ergehe, ist ein Beweis, daß ich noch nicht viel davon verstehen gelernt habe.
Der Kaufmann über Palagoias Narrheiten (310): sind wir doch alle so! unsere Narrheiten bezahlen wir gar gerne selbst, zu unseren Tugenden sollen andere das Geld hergeben.
Über Existenz und Effekt in Kunst (399): Existenz bei Homer dargestellt, bei uns gewöhnlich Effekt; sie schilderten das Fürchterliche, wir schildern fürchterlich etc.
Optimismus – Pessimismus (An Herder, 17. Mai 1787 (399): je mehr ich die Welt sehe, desto weniger kann ich hoffen, daß die Menschheit je eine weise, kluge, glückliche Masse werden könne.
dazu auch (411): Herder wird gewiß den schönen Traumwunsch der Menschheit, daß es dereinst besser mit ihr werden solle, trefflich ausgeführt haben. Auch, muß ich selbst sagen, halt ich es für wahr, daß die Humanität endlich siegen wird, nur fürcht ich, daß zu gleicher Zeit die Welt ein großes Hospital, und einer des anderen humaner Krankenwärter sein werde.
Über die Geschäftigkeit der Neapolitaner (28. Mai; 411pp): keiner ist faul.

Namen mit denen G. unbekannte weibliche Personen bedacht:
(erst ab S. 450)
junge hübsche Weibsperson (451)
die italienischen Mäuschen (30.7.1787; 464)
die als Frauenzimmer verkleideten Kastraten (31.7.87; 465)

seine umständliche Sprache, eigendlich oft garnicht schön:
z.B. 1. Satz der “Störenden Naturbetrachtungen“ (467): Wer an sich erfahren hat, was ein reichhaltiger Gedanke heißen will, er sei nun aus uns selbst entsprungen oder ... etc.

ethmologisches Spiel (579): „[Sie finden,] daß alle Völker versucht haben, sich dem inneren Sinn gemäß auszudrücken aber oft abgeleitet worden. Demzufolge suchen wir in den Sprachen die Worte auf, die am glücklichsten getroffen sind [... ]; dann verändern wir die Worte, bis sie uns recht dünken [...] auch machen wir Namen für Menschen, untersuchen ob diesem oder jenem sein Name gehöre u.s.w.“

Die Ausgabe von 1921 ended mit der Lateinischen Originalversion der Elegie Ovids. Diese ist hier weggelassen, nur Goethes Übersetzung gebracht, dafür zusätzlich aber noch eine kleine Rückschau, die Seite wohl erst später in Weimar hinzugefügt.

It seems to me impossible to give this work a meaningful rating. (IV-12)
  MeisterPfriem | Apr 9, 2012 |
Naar Italië! Meerdere eeuwen lang deed deze oproep de fine fleur van de Noord-Europese jeugd naar het Zuiden reizen voor een grand tour van zinnelijk genot waarmee de jeugdjaren werden afgesloten om nadien in de voetsporen van hun ernstige vaders te treden. Niet zo voor Goethe die in 1786 zonder iemand vooraf in te lichten voor een tweejarige reis naar het land van de renaissance trok. Voor Goethe was deze reis meer een vlucht weg van Weimar om op zoek te gaan naar zichzelf, een soort van persoonlijke renaissance. "Er is trouwens niets te vergelijken met het nieuwe leven waartoe de aanblik van een nieuw land een contemplatief mens in staat stelt. Hoewel ik nog altijd dezelfde ben, meen ik toch dat ik tot in het merg ben veranderd" (p. 143). "... want bij dit oord knoopt heel de wereldgeschiedenis aan, en ik reken mijn tweede geboorte, een ware wedergeboorte, vanaf de dag waarop ik Rome betrad" (p.144). "De reiziger uit het Noorden gelooft dat hij naar Rome komt om een aanvulling voor zijn bestaan te vinden, zijn lacunes op te vullen; maar pas gaandeweg wordt hij met een groot gevoel van onbehagen gewaar dat hij zijn opvattingen geheel moet veranderen en van voren af aan moet beginnen" (p. 432). "In Rome heb ik mezelf voor het eerst gevonden, ik ben hier voor het eerst in harmonie met mezelf gelukkig en verstandig geworden" (p. 528).
Italiaanse Reis is een prachtige en met veel zorg uitgegeven kluif van 554 pagina's met 100 extra pagina's van aantekeningen en verwijzingen. Het is zeker geen reisgids met weetjes of anecdotes maar een erg persoonlijk document van een literaire grootheid. Het is als het ware een 'Bildung' dagboek met Napels en Rome als zwaartepunten in Goethes verblijf en ontwikkeling. Dat hij zo weinig tijd heeft doorgebracht in Firenze heeft hij zich later wel beklaagd. Je kan de man alleen maar benijden om zijn persoonlijke grand tour langs zovele steden en kunstwerken, en om zijn ontmoetingen met zovele kunstenaars (hij hoopte en oefende erg om zelf schilder te worden maar moest uiteindelijk vaststellen dat hij hiertoe niet het nodige talent had). Goethe observeert en beschrijft helder alles rondom hem: steden, gebouwen, kunstwerken, landschappen, planten, natuurverschijnselen, mensen en hun gewoonten. ( )
2 ääni rvdm61 | Jul 15, 2011 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 13) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (100 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Johann Wolfgang von Goetheensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetlaskettu
Auden, W. H.Kääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Bofill, Rafael M.Kääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Einem, Herbert vonCommentsmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Mayer, ElizabethKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Müller-Freienfels, RichardToimittajamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Michel, ChristophJälkisanatmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Rega, LorenzoJohdantomuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Schildt, GöranJohdantomuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Trunz, ErichToimittajamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Westphal, GertKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (2)

In 1786, when he was already the acknowledged leader of the Sturm und Drang literary movement, Goethe set out on a journey to Italy to fulfil a personal and artistic quest and to find relief from his responsibilities and the agonies of unrequited love. As he travelled to Venice, Rome, Naples and Sicily he wrote many letters, which he later used as the basis for the Italian Journey. A journal full of fascinating observations on art and history, and the plants, landscape and the character of the local people he encountered, this is also a moving account of the psychological crisis from which Goethe emerged newly inspired to write the great works of his mature years.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.85)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 6
2.5 1
3 17
3.5 4
4 32
4.5 5
5 20

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

Penguin Australia

Penguin Australia on julkaissut painoksen tästä kirjasta.

» Kustantajan sivusto

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 163,383,308 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä