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Sotamies Ivan Tsonkinin ihmeelliset seikkailut (1969)

– tekijä: Vladimir Vojnovitsj

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

Sarjat: The Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin (1)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
4791140,161 (4.03)34
On the eve of World War II, a Red Army plane is forced to land in a remote Russian Village. Private Ivan Chonkin, a clumsy and naive peasant with a quirky common sense, is considered the most dispensable member of his regiment and is sent there with orders to guard the plane. Quickly forgotten by his superiors, Chonkin is integrated into the life of the town, where he participates in a series of hilarious events accompanied by his bizarre neighbors. But faced with the psychosis provoked by the German invasion, the political police learn of his existence and send a party to arrest him for desertion.   En vísperas del estallido de la segunda guerra mundial, un avión del Ejército Rojo realiza un aterrizaje forzoso en una remota aldea rusa. El soldado Iván Chonkin, un campesino desmañado e ingenuo pero dotado de un peculiar sentido común, es considerado el miembro más prescindible de su regimiento y es enviado allí con órdenes de custodiar el aparato. Olvidado rápidamente por sus superiores, Chonkin se integra en la peculiar vida del pueblo, donde protagoniza un sinfín de escenas hilarantes en compañía de sus estrafalarios vecinos. Pero ante la psicosis provocada por la invasión alemana, la policía política se entera de su existencia y envía un destacamento para arrestarlo por deserción.… (lisätietoja)
Viimeisimmät tallentajatGoeleCusters, LizMo, FEBeyer, HenkD, llibreprovenza, twharring, kwhafar, ejmw
PerintökirjastotGillian Rose
  1. 20
    Typerysten salaliitto (tekijä: John Kennedy Toole) (rabornj)
  2. 20
    Kunnon sotamies Švejk maailmansodassa (tekijä: Jaroslav Hašek) (pgmcc)
    pgmcc: Chonkin is very similar to Svejk. The humour and satire are very similar; as is the exposition of bureaucratic nonsense.
  3. 00
    The Red Commissar (tekijä: Jaroslav Hašek) (pgmcc)
    pgmcc: This is a Russian soldier in WWII who is very similar to Svjek.
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» Katso myös 34 mainintaa

englanti (10)  espanja (1)  Kaikki kielet (11)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 11) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I usually don't laugh at books that are supposed to be funny, especially ones that fall under the category of satire. I find a lot of allegedly funny writers try to be clever and end up being obnoxiously smarmy. There's no real humor in an author attempting to present him/herself as more intelligent than the book's characters. There is, however, plenty of humor in a guy finding out he just drank a glass of human shit.

The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin is a very funny book as well as an impressive satirical depiction of the pre-WW2 USSR. Having previously read The Ivankiad, I was already aware of Vladimir Voinovich's ability to lampoon Soviet bureaucracy, but this is on another level. Voinovich has created a vibrant collective farm filled with citizens who, despite their exaggerated, comical personalities, struggle with many of the real problems faced by Russian peasants throughout the reign of Stalin.

Voinovich is at his funniest when writing about dreams. Ivan Chonkin and his neighbor Gladischev are ridiculous people who dream about even more ridiculous things based entirely on their inability to participate in normal human conversations. Their misunderstandings of how the world works and how the people around them think and feel lead to amazing nighttime hallucinations.

My only qualm with the book is the inconsistency of Chonkin's stupidity. He's in general a bumbling fool, but there are points where he's somehow stupid enough to ask a high-ranking Communist official about Stalin having two wives while at the same time smart enough to solve a food shortage crisis using a Soviet intelligence unit that he managed to singlehandedly capture. These wild swings in capability were a bit much to handle, and I felt intense sympathy for Nyura, a wonderful woman who just happened to pick the wrong man at the wrong time to be her partner.

Voinovich died this summer at the age of 85. While his most significant achievement may have been sneaking Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate out of the Soviet Union, it would be a shame to ignore his own literary output, much of which took the same bravery to write as Grossman's did. Voinovich was a significant voice as a Soviet dissident and one of the funniest writers in the USSR or anywhere else, so I highly recommend reading (and laughing at) all he created. ( )
  bgramman | May 9, 2020 |
This book had some good parts, I'm not going to pretend it didn't. However, I felt that, overall, it was not as powerful as I was hoping it would be and that it was written in such a style as to make it less appealing to me than if it were written otherwise. Nevertheless, a decent novel.

3 stars. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Oct 20, 2019 |



Short, bowlegged, big red ears, field shirt sticking out over his belt, Private Ivan Chonkin, the hero of Vladimir Voinovich’s novel, has been likened to Jaroslav Hašek's The Good Soldier Švejk, and for good reason – like Švejk, Chonkin is an everyman forever at war with the forces - political, military, social, whatever - that use the iron fist of power in an attempt to obliterate a person’s unique individuality and humanity.

Squarely in the great tradition of satire and the absurdist fiction of Gogol, Kharms and Zabolotsky, with The Life & Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin Vladimir Voinovich served up enough anti-Soviet zingers to contribute to his eventually getting kicked out of the country and stripped of his citizenship.

The storyline is simple: a pilot of a Soviet aircraft makes a forced landing in the farming village of Krasnoye near his Air Force base. Private Ivan Chonkin is sent to guard the military’s property.

I so much enjoyed the novel’s narrator telling readers directly how he amassed information on the subject of Chonkin and the village and added a little something of his own. And how he would have taken a tall, well built, disciplined military hero for his main character but all those crack students of military and political theory where already taken up and all he was left with was Chonkin. However, he urges us to treat his novel’s hero (Chonkin) as we would our very own child since when we have a child we get what we get and don’t throw the kid out the window.

Likewise, I relished the Mikhail Bulgakovesque dream sequences that gave Mr. Voinovich the opportunity to flex his creative imagination. Chonkin has his first dream when he’s sleeping in bed with Nyurka, his new girlfriend from the village. He watches as none other than Comrade Stalin slowly descends from the sky holding his rifle and wearing a woman’s dress. Stalin tells the sergeant in charge that Private Chonkin abandoned his post guarding the aircraft, lost his combat weapon and therefore deserves to be shot.

In our hero’s second dream, he attends a wedding reception where the groom and all the guests turn out to be not humans but pigs. Oh, no, he's been duped! Chonkin realizes he has blurted out a classified military secret to the first person (actually a pig) he ran into at the table. And one of the dire consequences of his fatal mistake? Humanork is on the menu! A tray bearing naked Comrade Stalin holding his famous pipe, all garnished with onions and green peas. Stalin grins slyly to himself behind his mustache.

The third dream is another doozy. This time the dreamer is Gladishev, one of the villagers who is a prototypical Soviet “new” man of science. In Gladishev’s dream his horse Osya informs him in plain Russian that he is no longer a horse but a human being. Gladishev says if Osya is a true Soviet human he would go to the front to fight the Germans. Osya replies that Gladishev is the dumbest person in the world since he should know a horse doesn’t have fingers to pull a trigger.

These are but snatches catching several colorful, hilarious bits. What's noteworthy is the way these dreams reinforce a major theme running throughout the novel: the prevailing Soviet system is a complete misreading of the rhythms of nature and life. Such an inept, ass-backwards system will lead men like Gladishev to do such things as fill his house with shit, even eat shit and drink water mixed with shit, based on scientific and materialistic calculations that all life is nourished by shit.

Such a misreading has its effect on all areas of Soviet life and community. For instance, at one village meeting the chairman of the local kolkhoz (collective farm) chastises members who fail to work the minimum number of workdays. Among the Comrades singled out for a tongue lashing is Zhikin, one of those who flaunts his age and illnesses. The chairman goes on: “Of course I realize that Zhikin is a disabled Civil War veteran and has not legs. But now he’s cashing in on those legs of his. . . Let him sit himself down in a furrow and crawl from bush to bush at his own speed, weeding as he goes and thereby fulfilling the minimum workday requirements.”

The chairman also is vocal when the village learns of the German offensive against their country: “The war will write everything off. The main thing’s to get to the front as fast as possible; there either you get a chest full of metals or a head full of bullets, but either way, at least you can live like an honest man.”

Such Soviet wisdom peppers every page. This is a very funny book. But as you are laughing, Comrades, you will be brought face-to-face with life on a community farm and in the military that is downright cruel and brutalizing.

One last example that really tickled my funny-bone. The narrator relays a rapid change of chairmen over at another village. The first chairman was put in jail for stealing, the second for seducing minors, and the third took to drinking and kept on drinking until he drank up everything he owned and all the kolkhoz funds. Things got so bad he hanged himself but left a one world suicide note – “Ech” with three exclamation points. The narrator tells us nobody figured out what that “Ech!!!” was supposed to mean. Actually, even as an American in 2018 I have a pretty good idea what he was getting at with his “Ech!!!” --- I CAN’T TAKE THIS ANY MORE!!!

Having read The Fur Hat and Moscow 2042 I wanted to treat myself to Vladimir Voinovich’s classic earlier work. I’m glad I did. I enjoy laughing and this novel provided ample opportunities. I can see why Ivan Chonkin is now a widely known figure in Russian popular culture.


Vladimir Voinovich, Born 1932

"Kuzma Gladishev was known as a learned man not only in Krasnoye but in the entire area. One of the many proofs of his erudition was the wooden outhouse in his garden, on which was written in large black letters, in English, WATER CLOSET." - Vladimir Voinovich, The Life & Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin ( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |
One doesn't need much background in Russia history or literature to enjoy this novel about broken bureaucracy. Ivan Chonkin is a likeable Everyman who engages in bumbling but satisfying comeuppances as the elite and self-important get their due, and the little guy just reward. Glad to read a lighthearted and funny novel about (and from) Soviet Russia. ( )
1 ääni Stbalbach | Jun 27, 2013 |
I have to imagine that one of the things most hated by authoritarian governments is being laughed at. It's no wonder then that Voinovich found his works being refused by the Soviet government for publication in the 1960s, found himself excluded from the Soviet Writers' Union in the 1970s, and was stripped of his citizenship and exiled in the 1980s.

The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin is often considered Voinovich's best work. He takes the familiar Russian character of Ivan the Fool and recasts him as Ivan Chonkin, a soldier in the Soviet Army at the advent of World War II. He is the perfect blend of bumbling naïveté with just a slight touch of guile that makes him endearing to the reader and has made him a modern folk figure in his own right.

Chonkin is sent to guard an airplane that has broken down and been left stranded in a farmer's field. Forgotten by the Army, he strikes up a relationship with the postmistress of the village and spends the war tending her livestock and garden. Of course, once the NKVD hear of him, it is inevitable that they should consider him a spy and—with jabs at Stalin, collectivism, the Army, Five Year Plans, and just about everything else Soviet...and with overt nods to Chekhov and Gogol—Voinovich takes on a hilarious ride through the consequences.

The 1990s brought a restoration of Voinovich's citizenship. However, while the literary world has handed him a prize here and there, I find myself wondering if the Russian government feels the same way. In 2007, he returned to familiar ground with the publishing of the third volume of Chonkin's adventures, Displaced Person, set in post-Soviet Russia.

This is a humorous anodyne for glooms or blues, particularly if you're of a certain age and your memory of Russia encompasses the Cold War era. ( )
5 ääni TadAD | Sep 14, 2010 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 11) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

On the eve of World War II, a Red Army plane is forced to land in a remote Russian Village. Private Ivan Chonkin, a clumsy and naive peasant with a quirky common sense, is considered the most dispensable member of his regiment and is sent there with orders to guard the plane. Quickly forgotten by his superiors, Chonkin is integrated into the life of the town, where he participates in a series of hilarious events accompanied by his bizarre neighbors. But faced with the psychosis provoked by the German invasion, the political police learn of his existence and send a party to arrest him for desertion.   En vísperas del estallido de la segunda guerra mundial, un avión del Ejército Rojo realiza un aterrizaje forzoso en una remota aldea rusa. El soldado Iván Chonkin, un campesino desmañado e ingenuo pero dotado de un peculiar sentido común, es considerado el miembro más prescindible de su regimiento y es enviado allí con órdenes de custodiar el aparato. Olvidado rápidamente por sus superiores, Chonkin se integra en la peculiar vida del pueblo, donde protagoniza un sinfín de escenas hilarantes en compañía de sus estrafalarios vecinos. Pero ante la psicosis provocada por la invasión alemana, la policía política se entera de su existencia y envía un destacamento para arrestarlo por deserción.

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