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Catfish and Mandala: A Two-Wheeled Voyage…
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Catfish and Mandala: A Two-Wheeled Voyage Through the Landscape and Memory… (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1999; vuoden 2000 painos)

– tekijä: Andrew Pham (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
6642325,991 (3.88)29
Vietnamese-born Andrew Pham finally returns to Saigon, not as a success showering money and gifts onto his family, but as an emotional shipwreck, desperate to find out who he really is. When his sister, a post-operative transsexual, committed suicide, Pham sold all his possessions and embarked on a year-long bicycle journey that took him through the Mexican desert; around a thousand-mile loop from Narita to Kyoto in Japan; and, after five months and 2,357 miles, to Saigon, where he finds nothing familiar in the bombed-out darkness. At first meant to facilitate forgetfulness, Pham's travels turn into an unforgettable, eye-opening search for cultural identity which flashes back to his parent's courtship in Vietnam, his father's imprisonment by the Vietcong, and his family's nail-bitingly narrow escape as boat people. Lucid, witty and beautifully written,… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:cpt.haddock
Teoksen nimi:Catfish and Mandala: A Two-Wheeled Voyage Through the Landscape and Memory of Vietnam
Kirjailijat:Andrew Pham (Tekijä)
Info:Picador (2000), Edition: 1, 352 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):*****
Avainsanoja:cycling

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Catfish and Mandala: A Two-Wheeled Voyage Through the Landscape and Memory of Vietnam (tekijä: Andrew X. Pham) (1999)

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» Katso myös 29 mainintaa

Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 23) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Catfish and Mandala is the story of an American odyssey—a solo bicycle voyage around the Pacific Rim to Vietnam—made by a young Vietnamese-American man in pursuit of both his adopted homeland and his forsaken fatherland.

Andrew X. Pham was born in Vietnam and raised in California. His father had been a POW of the Vietcong; his family came to America as "boat people." Following the suicide of his sister, Pham quit his job, sold all of his possessions, and embarked on a year-long bicycle journey that took him through the Mexican desert, around a thousand-mile loop from Narita to Kyoto in Japan; and, after five months and 2,357 miles, to Saigon, where he finds "nothing familiar in the bombed-out darkness." In Vietnam, he's taken for Japanese or Korean by his countrymen, except, of course, by his relatives, who doubt that as a Vietnamese he has the stamina to complete his journey ("Only Westerners can do it"); and in the United States he's considered anything but American. A vibrant, picaresque memoir written with narrative flair and an eye-opening sense of adventure, Catfish and Mandala is an unforgettable search for cultural identity. ( )
  CarolBurrows | May 18, 2021 |
I enjoyed this a lot. It reads well and there is plenty of interesting material, both in terms of stories and observations as well as self reflection and exploring what identity means. The author is pretty open in sharing things, even when might reflect poorly on him. It skips around sometimes, mostly that's ok and merely leaves the reader wondering what other stories lurk in those gaps. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
Vietnam on a bike, knows the language, usually viewed as Korean or Japanese, lived in the country until he was 10 during half of the Vietnam War, US educated engineer. Could have been 4 stars with less of the family drama and soul-searching segments. I grew up one town over from his US "hometown" so for that reason I found his winding family assimilation particularly interesting. But c'mon, 1000s of miles on a bike in Mexico, Japan, and Vietnam - write about that! ( )
  pizzadj2 | May 27, 2019 |
I probably would not have enjoyed this book as much as I did if I hadn't been in Vietnam as I was reading it. He's a Viet-kieu, one of those "boat people" who left as a child and returned years later. As a result, he was experiencing the country as I was, but also as someone who understood the language. An outsider and (somewhat looked down-upon) insider at the same time.

I shared so many of his impressions. The streets of Hanoi jammed with motorcycles loaded with everything conceivable going every which way, ridden by masked men and women on cellphones with babies and small children riding along; not to mention the trucks and the people and the cars and the constant car horns and the pollution. The food, some delicious but some quite questionable (e.g. organs), and the water you can only drink out of the ubiquitous plastic bottles, both of which eventually gave him dysentery. The people, welcoming and (of him) scornful at the same time.

I liked the interwoven strands of his previous life and his journey, and how he discovered himself in the process. ( )
  bobbieharv | Jun 3, 2018 |
Andrew Pham is a Vietnamese American, who went back to Vietnam, and bicycled across the country; in an exploration of his identity and roots. I felt that the book could have used a little more editing and focus. The book is dedicated to one of Pham's siblings, Chi, who committed suicide at age 32. Chi's story really should be the center of the book; and it would be a good base for an exploration of the authors ambivalence about Vietnamese American identity. (which I think is the purpose of the book) However the book seems to careen from story to story; camping near the Tokyo airport, drinking with cousins in Saigon, an ex-girlfriends relationship with her birthfather. Each story is interesting in it's own right, but maybe not all in the same book. ( )
  banjo123 | Jan 28, 2018 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 23) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
What is the proper number of kisses
For a man to leave this world?
The average depth of melancholy?
The approximate wetness of hope?
- Max Garland
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
to the memory of my sister Chi, my brother Minh, one and the same... if only I had learned to see without looking
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Grandmother told me it had been written in my sister Chi's fortune penned by a Vietnamese Buddhist monk on the day of her birth, in the year of the Tiger: suicide at thirty-two. (Prologue)

The first thing I notice about Tyle is that he can squat on his haunches Third World-style, indefinitely.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

Vietnamese-born Andrew Pham finally returns to Saigon, not as a success showering money and gifts onto his family, but as an emotional shipwreck, desperate to find out who he really is. When his sister, a post-operative transsexual, committed suicide, Pham sold all his possessions and embarked on a year-long bicycle journey that took him through the Mexican desert; around a thousand-mile loop from Narita to Kyoto in Japan; and, after five months and 2,357 miles, to Saigon, where he finds nothing familiar in the bombed-out darkness. At first meant to facilitate forgetfulness, Pham's travels turn into an unforgettable, eye-opening search for cultural identity which flashes back to his parent's courtship in Vietnam, his father's imprisonment by the Vietcong, and his family's nail-bitingly narrow escape as boat people. Lucid, witty and beautifully written,

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