KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy

Tekijä: William B Irvine

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,2423615,304 (4.03)13
"In A Guide to the Good Life, Irvine offers a refreshing presentation of Stoicism, showing how this ancient philosophy can still direct us toward a better life. Using the psychological insights and the practical techniques of the Stoics, Irvine offers a road map for anyone seeking to avoid the feelings of chronic dissatisfaction that plague so many of us. Irvine looks at various Stoic techniques for attaining tranquility and shows how to put these techniques to work in our own life. As he does so, he describes his own experiences practicing Stoicism and offers valuable firsthand advice for anyone wishing to live better by following in the footsteps of these ancient philosophers. We learn how to minimize worry, how to let go of the past and focus on the things we can control, and how to deal with insults, grief, old age, and the distracting temptations of fame and fortune. We learn from Marcus Aurelius the importance of prizing only things of true value, and from Epictetus we learn how to be more content with what we have." "Finally, A Guide to the Good Life shows us how to become thoughtful observers of our own lives. If we watch ourselves as we go about our daily business and later reflect on what we saw, we can better identify the sources of distress and eventually avoid that pain. By doing this, the Stoics thought, we can hope to attain a truly joyful life."--Jacket.… (lisätietoja)
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin nähdäksesi, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 13 mainintaa

Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 36) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
As a "philosophy of life", Stoicism has a lot to recommend it. Everyone could use a little more tranquillity in their life. I found this book fairly repetitive, but it was ultimately a good, systematic introduction to the Stoics whose philosophies are a kind of mental judo against negative emotions. Well worth consideration by anyone that might struggle with self-worth or fulfilment. ( )
  ropable | Aug 20, 2023 |
Sort of preachy at times, but an enlightening read. ( )
  zeh | Jun 3, 2023 |
A very accessible introduction to Stoicism. The author is clearly enthused but to his credit he also allows that others may find another approach to a personal 'philosophy of life' a better fit for themselves.

I find the stoic exhortation to be careful about goals and to accept for one self the goal of doing one's best rather than a particular achievement in the world to fit quite well with Carol Dweck's psychology of the 'growth mindset'.

It's Irvine's exploration of hedonic adaptation and the value of negative visualization that I find most compelling. This by itself is reason enough to explore this philosophy.

In today's world, some of the questions Irvine raises- What is the most helpful approach to grieving, assistance with emotional expression or unassisted bearing? - should be amenable to experimental trial. There is certainly anough grief in the world and you can make the case that we should become as skilled as possible in managing it.

Recommended. ( )
  EdPontius | Mar 17, 2023 |
Gives a good presentation of Stoicism, but otherwise fails to be particularly engaging. Also, the author seems to be unable to get out of his myopic (and apparently very cut-throat and mean) academic world and so dwells a lot on how to be a closet Stoic to avoid being mocked for it. Finally, he takes pains to point out how one's Stoic demeanor will surely piss off those who are being insulting. I'm at best semi-stoic, and that mostly by happenstance, but I'm sort of thinking this can't be a very stoic attitude. Anyhow, if there's a Complete Idiot's Guide to Stoicism or a Stoicism For Dummies, either is surely a better option for getting turned on to Stoicism than this dry set of pages. ( )
  qaphsiel | Feb 20, 2023 |
If you had gone to Epictetus and said, “I want to live a good life. What should I do?” he would have had an answer for you: “Live in accordance with nature.”

Ever since I heard William B. Irvine on the "Waking Up" app (as it turns out reciting some paragraphs from the book in question), I've grown to wonder about the "Stoic tools" he mentioned. To me, they sounded not so much "not Stoic" but more so slightly redundant to the point of there being barely any use in sticking "Stoicism" label to them to make them shimmer fancy. After all, it's nothing new to hear "things could've been worse" or "all is in your hands" - if we are to thank Stoicism for those clichés, be so.

However, there is something about the fact that regardless of how well-conditioned we are to say such things, they don't quite click. After all, we are more used to repeating them than living by them.

Unlike small talks, which handed me each tool at a time, this book provided a kit to put those tools into and a framework. Each tool - be it negative visualisation, trichotomy of control, self-deprecating humour - found its screws and nails in rich-enough context, with repetition legitamasing. Quotes by Stoics such as Seneca and Epectitus, as well as a neat guide through the history of Stoicism, were a much welcome addition to an overall strategic (self-helpy) structure of the book.

This book is not extremely persuasive - and that's exactly what turns it into a pleasant read.

What, if not impressive, then at the very least commendable is that the author, though sharing his personal journey with Stoicism and the kind of effect it had on his overall well-being (which was, thankfully, only sprinkled in the book itself and was served as a desert by the end of it), underlined "the benefit of the doubt". You don't think that Stoicism suits you? Well, you might be right. There is no "the only way", with many other apart from Stoicism to explore in pursuit of one goal - a philosophy of life.
Even the author himself questions whether he won't look back a couple of years after at his "Stoic phase" in dismay.

The author does a great job presenting a somewhat neo, modern-age Stoicism, with evolution instead of Zeus and no suggestions to go outside barefoot or live in barrels.

Coming from personal experience, I assume this book might be helpful for those working consciously through their anxiety-related issues (especially when it comes to formulating narratives) and those willing to challenge their pessimistic inclinations - this book calibrates pessimism to be more realistic, with positive things not being swept under the rug as well. Though it primarily focuses on moderation and appreciation of what one already has, it provides a basis to seek happiness in it - happiness which may remain undiscovered until consciously awakened and assessed. ( )
  RossannaB | Nov 11, 2022 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 36) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
All in all Irvine does a fine job in offering his “resolutely practical” brand of Stoicism to a popular audience. His citation of the original sources is effective and stimulating of interest. His tone is just the right one for the popular audience he wishes to reach. But Irvine’s work has more to offer than that. I believe he has unwittingly done a service to the scholarly audience as well by reminding us that the Stoics (and other ancient schools) were indeed all concerned with ‘meaning of life’ questions ...
 
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Teoksen kanoninen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
In memory of Charlie Doyle, who taught me to keep my head in the boat even when I'm not rowing.
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
What do you want out of life?
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Indeed, pursuing pleasure, Seneca warns, is like pursuing a wild beast: On being captured, it can turn on us and tear us to pieces. Or, changing the metaphor a bit, he tells us that intense pleasures, when captured by us, become our captors, meaning that the more pleasures a man captures, “the more masters will he have to serve.”
[Antisthenes, a Cynic] also advised his listeners to “pay attention to your enemies, for they are the first to discover your mistakes.”
Your primary desire, says Epictetus, should be your desire not to be frustrated by forming desires you won’t be able to fulfill.
if we seek social status, we give other people power over us: We have to do things calculated to make them admire us, and we have to refrain from doing things that will trigger their disfavor.
By contemplating the impermanence of everything in the world, we are forced to recognize that every time we do something could be the last time we do it, and this recognition can invest the things we do with a significance and intensity that would otherwise be absent.
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen kieli
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

"In A Guide to the Good Life, Irvine offers a refreshing presentation of Stoicism, showing how this ancient philosophy can still direct us toward a better life. Using the psychological insights and the practical techniques of the Stoics, Irvine offers a road map for anyone seeking to avoid the feelings of chronic dissatisfaction that plague so many of us. Irvine looks at various Stoic techniques for attaining tranquility and shows how to put these techniques to work in our own life. As he does so, he describes his own experiences practicing Stoicism and offers valuable firsthand advice for anyone wishing to live better by following in the footsteps of these ancient philosophers. We learn how to minimize worry, how to let go of the past and focus on the things we can control, and how to deal with insults, grief, old age, and the distracting temptations of fame and fortune. We learn from Marcus Aurelius the importance of prizing only things of true value, and from Epictetus we learn how to be more content with what we have." "Finally, A Guide to the Good Life shows us how to become thoughtful observers of our own lives. If we watch ourselves as we go about our daily business and later reflect on what we saw, we can better identify the sources of distress and eventually avoid that pain. By doing this, the Stoics thought, we can hope to attain a truly joyful life."--Jacket.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Current Discussions

-

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (4.03)
0.5
1 4
1.5 1
2 13
2.5 2
3 36
3.5 14
4 101
4.5 9
5 89

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 201,581,497 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä