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The Denial of Death – tekijä: Ernest…
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The Denial of Death (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1973; vuoden 1997 painos)

– tekijä: Ernest Becker (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,666218,103 (4.1)33
Winner of the Pulitzer prize in 1974 and the culmination of a life's work, The Denial of Death is Ernest Becker's brilliant and impassioned answer to the "why" of human existence. In bold contrast to the predominant Freudian school of thought, Becker tackles the problem of the vital lie -- man's refusal to acknowledge his own mortality. In doing so, he sheds new light on the nature of humanity and issues a call to life and its living that still resonates more than twenty years after its writing.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:d.a.kauflin
Teoksen nimi:The Denial of Death
Kirjailijat:Ernest Becker (Tekijä)
Info:Free Press (1997), Edition: 1, 336 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
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The Denial of Death (tekijä: Ernest Becker) (1973)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatyksityinen kirjasto, Benim, Hillside_Library, Maddyee, Frederic_Schneider, gnav, Robbie1970, tdcackler
PerintökirjastotRalph Ellison
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 21) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Amazing thoughts about the existential problems of the human animal - after this reading everyone can see why is it so important to "hack" one's self-consciousness. ( )
  t_berci | Sep 16, 2021 |
Not much here unless you're interested in history of psychoanalys. Never really makes any arguments beyond "everyone wants to be the hero of the story". Not exactly ground breaking stuff the title suggets. ( )
  Paul_S | Aug 8, 2021 |
This ambitious multidisciplinary work seeks to reveal the underlying psychological tensions of the human condition, evaluate the various ways men have sought to resolve them (including religion) and make some conclusions, which might be best summarized as “Keep Calm and Carry On.” Ernest Becker reviews the scientific discoveries of psychology starting with Sigmund Freud’s initial project of psychoanalysis and proceeding to its corrections and modifications by his opponents and successors, in particular Otto Rank. He also brings to bear the insights of existentialism (Kierkegaard, who he says anticipated modern psychology), anthropology and theology (Tillich). His intention is to bring together in one place these explorations into the fear of death. His basic theme is that the fear of death creates anxiety that, at least in modern times, man has not been able to resolve. We repress the awareness of death to avoid having to face up to it. If we remove our repressions, we may go mad. He digs down into this using all of the disciplines referenced above, in particular drawing out the paradoxical dualism between the organismic animal or creature-like existence of man and the self-consciousness or soul which goes beyond nature and creates culture. (Put another way by citing the Jonah Syndrome, man is both god and worm).The bottom line is that the anxiety of death generates a narcissistic desire to control one’s destiny and for immortality which man can only seek to achieve through heroic action, which Becker identifies as the central problem of mankind. He looks at various solutions, none of which work: the individual character we develop for ourselves which avoids the issue by repression, religion, romantic love for another, leadership worship and other forms of transference, perversions and psychoanalytic therapy. Along the way, there are numerous gems of insight that enhance the interest of the book, even if at the end Becker cannot provide us with the complete answer the species demands. In effect, he seems to undermine his own principal thesis concerning the primacy of the fear of death when at the end of the book he points out that man has other “vital interests” that can inspire his actions even if death cannot ultimately be denied.

Such a book raises many questions. Does it adequately take into account a feminist perspective on these psychological and existential issues? Does it reflect an elitist view of the “problem” of the well-to-do individual and ignore or even disdain the life of the “masses”? Is it too beholden to its times, basically the 1960s (for example, in the characterization of homosexuality)? Does the book give adequate attention to the insights of sociology on its issues? Does the incorporation of so many different thinkers from so many different disciplines also contribute to confusion in seeking to grasp the differences among them? On the other hand, because of a primary focus on the psychological strand, are other important thinkers left out with little or no mention: Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Heidegger, Jaspers, Marcel. How would Becker’s analysis be affected by the digital revolution and the threat of climate change?

The questions and the complexity should not deter reading this fascinating work. It is impossible in a short summary to reveal the breadth and scope of the book’s coverage. Just to give a taste, Becker ranges from the Oedipus complex through the psychoanalytic meaning of Freud’s fainting spells to the trends of the 1960s including Norman Brown’s and Herbert Marcuse’s notions that ending repression would create a new man and the emergence of psychotherapists as the gurus for individual fulfillment. Along the way, he quotes Goethe, Montaigne, Pascal, Hegel, Marx and many others. ( )
  drsabs | Apr 30, 2020 |
I find Becker's work to be fair, but lacking in depth for he failed to consider significant Jungian contributions to psychology. Becker claims Jung resorted to "needless esoterism" which is his way of tacitly admitting he didn't really understand Jung. What's more if he had understood Jung's theory of individuation and the nature of the hero archetype he could have condensed his book into 75 pages or less because an honest understanding of Jung either negates a fair portion of his own speculations or makes them redundant. I also think Becker's popularity and Pulitzer had more to do with good cultural timing than good analysis or writing. In the 1970's psychology was popular and people were looking for any scientific or scholarly excuse to justify explaining away religion as little more than superstitious fears of death. Simultaneously, the feminists were looking to make fun of Freud. By over relying on the works of Otto Rank while criticizing Freud, Becker was able to provide a book that did both. Had Becker published his book in the 1950s or in the 1980s, I'm confident it wouldn't have had such a positive reception. For certain, the denial of mortality by the human ego is a defense mechanism that gives extra energy to certain belief systems like the afterlife and heroic resurrections, but that is by far not the only understanding of the origin of such stories and beliefs and Becker never explored any of them very far despite the considerably lengthy ramblings of his book. ( )
1 ääni Chickenman | Sep 11, 2018 |
I've never really understood Freud. I've never really grasped that in Freud's strange doctrines lie some of the most profound insights into how we as humans work.

We are, to paraphrase, amazing children of God with the mental capacities to ponder the depths of eternity and to enjoy the beauties of the cosmos, yet we are also mortal creatures sentenced to death, creatures who eat and, after eating, must take dumps, must make dirt, must lay cables, must sprout the brown trouts -- in short, we are creatures who crap. Freud's doctrine attempted to make sense of these two wildly disparate facts -- i.e., of our child-of-God-ness and our mortal-creatures-who-crap-ness. That's no easy task. Neither is the task of comprehending Freud. But Becker definitely does it. I can't wait to read the book again (I've already read it twice). ( )
1 ääni evamat72 | Mar 31, 2016 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 21) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä (2 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Becker, Ernestensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Keen, SamEsipuhemuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
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Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Non ridere, non lugere, neque detestari, sed intelligere. (Not to laugh, not to lament, not to curse, but to understand.) - Spinoza
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
To the memory of my beloved parents, who unwittingly gave me - among many other things - the most paradoxical gift of all: a confusion about heroism.
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
The prospect of death, Dr. Johnson said, wonderfully concentrates the mind.
Sitaatit
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Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (3)

Winner of the Pulitzer prize in 1974 and the culmination of a life's work, The Denial of Death is Ernest Becker's brilliant and impassioned answer to the "why" of human existence. In bold contrast to the predominant Freudian school of thought, Becker tackles the problem of the vital lie -- man's refusal to acknowledge his own mortality. In doing so, he sheds new light on the nature of humanity and issues a call to life and its living that still resonates more than twenty years after its writing.

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