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Metroland (1980)

– tekijä: Julian Barnes

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
7651421,676 (3.62)32
The adolescent Christopher and his soul mate Toni had sneered at the stifling ennui of Metroland, their cosy patch of suburbia on the Metropolitan line. They had longed for Life to begin - meaning Sex and Freedom - to travel and choose their own clothes.Then Chris, at thirty, starts to settle comfortably into bourgeois contentment himself. Luckily, Toni is still around to challenge such backsliding..… (lisätietoja)
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» Katso myös 32 mainintaa

englanti (11)  hollanti (2)  espanja (1)  Kaikki kielet (14)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 14) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Beschrijving van drie levensfasen (scholier, student, vader) van een dertigjarige man in de jaren zestig van de twintigste eeuw ( )
  huizenga | Nov 22, 2020 |
3.5
A somewhat enjoyable novel. It was too short in my opinion. It ended just when it got interesting.
How fitting it was that this was my 14th and final Barnes' novel, although it was his first. But don't worry, I still plan on reading two of his short story collections before the New Year's Eve.

I'm glad to see that this was still the same Barnes as we know him. In 1980. he was already a huge admirer of Flaubert's as well as the French culture. "Metroland" deals with the rebellious youth versus the adults who've given up on their ideals from youth and "sold out". ( )
  aljosa95 | Mar 27, 2018 |
I picked this up at a bookshop in Vancouver on my way to meet a friend, the description on the back feeling promising and befitting. Friends who consider themselves pretty great as teenagers being forced to face what that amounts to later on. I love that Barnes handles this without condemning anything, but it gets under my skin at this stage of my life, that's sure. This book isn't perfect and isn't as good as his later stuff, but it still gave me a lot of things I needed, and it kept striking me in strange ways.

[b:Flaubert's Parrot|2176|Flaubert's Parrot|Julian Barnes|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1400866083s/2176.jpg|1414912] alerted me to Barnes' familiarity with French writers of the 19th century, a subject aligning with my own interests, but I wasn't aware of how intensely Francophile he is. Apparently I ought to read [b:Cross Channel|110948|Cross Channel|Julian Barnes|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1356453412s/110948.jpg|2456074]. The mentions of Baudelaire and Gautier pricked my attention, but when it came to the Gustave Moreau museum I nearly lost it. Everything about it, an unwelcoming building near Saint-Lazare, the kind of place you find out about on your third trip and visit on your fourth, made it feel like Barnes was repeating my own experiences back to me. It's a rather important museum to me, the justification of a "research trip" to Paris when my English visa expired, staying with my sister who lived there at the time, and all the strange background and personal history that led me there at that time. It's not a place I see mentioned a lot and it almost bothered me as much as it excited me that Barnes would write about this place and make it important and everything.

This was a right-book-at-the-right-time kind of read for me, for certain, though part of me wonders if there'd ever be a wrong time with Barnes. ( )
  likecymbeline | Apr 1, 2017 |
Brilliant reading by Greg Wise made this excellent book even better. One of those books where you deliberately go slowly towards the end to try to prolong the good experience. I liked the characters and found them all to be entirely believable (although I have never lived in England). I especially enjoyed the degree of introspection throughout. My only negative comment is that there was quite a lot of French expression and because I was 'reading' an audiobook version I couldn't see the words to look then up to get a translation. Knowledge of the French language would have enhanced my reading even more. ( )
  oldblack | Feb 16, 2016 |
Julian Barnes is becoming one of my most favorite writers of contemporary literary fiction. I've enjoyed Flaubert's Parrot and Arthur and George, two disparate works in comparison. Even in this, his debut three part novel, he's proven he possesses an unrivaled stretch of the imagination when it comes to writing about men's lives, showing them in a quirky, humane, and somewhat befuddled states as they attempt to work out a personal philosophy to live by. Three books could hardly be more unlike one from than the other than these when it comes to subject, but they are similar in thematic material.

Art as a civilizing and meaningful influence on mankind and as a moral compass for the individual once one discover's his personal relationship to it is at the core of the novel. As a precocious student and budding Francophile living in 1963 London (Metroland), Christopher despises the bourgeoisie. He and his friend, Toni, express their disgust in the most vaulted halls of the Nat Gal while binocular draped and surrounded by great masterpieces of dead artists. Together they focus on and "test" the people against their world view. What better way to see the superiority of their philosophy of life?

In 1968, Chris comes of age sexually and works toward finding his feet in regard to his guide-on of fine art while living in Paris with his French lover. Here he meets Marian, his future wife. This section may depend a little too much on the poor Bohemian attelier-dwelling student type, yet the closing chapter with the extended descriptive paragraphs devoted to his room as Chris lingers over his last look around before departing the City of Lights is the most beautiful and memorable writing in all the novel.

It's 1977, "Metroland II." Chris is married, finds himself a happy husband and father, ad-man and aspiring author who can admit under the interrogation of his goading gadfly friend Toni that he's more than satisfied with his life. A reunion with the Old School boys let's us see both backward in assessment and forward in philosophic maturity as Chris gracefully becomes a version of what he once despised as a schoolboy. Naivete has fallen away; Chris is ready to face whatever may come -- even his own death, the thought of which terrified him in boyhood -- because he's fortified by his consistent faith that "old pictures" have value for all of us beyond the aesthetic and that that faith has given him the bedrock to fearlessly love his wife and child, and his human existence come what may. ( )
  Limelite | Sep 26, 2014 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 14) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

The adolescent Christopher and his soul mate Toni had sneered at the stifling ennui of Metroland, their cosy patch of suburbia on the Metropolitan line. They had longed for Life to begin - meaning Sex and Freedom - to travel and choose their own clothes.Then Chris, at thirty, starts to settle comfortably into bourgeois contentment himself. Luckily, Toni is still around to challenge such backsliding..

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