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Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left…

– tekijä: Loung Ung

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
245582,776 (3.96)12
"When Loung Ung came to America in 1980 as a ten-year-old Cambodian refugee, she had already survived years of hunger, violence, and loss at the hands of the Khmer Rouge, a story she told in her bestseller, First They Killed My Father. Now, in Lucky Child, Ung writes of assimilation and, in alternating chapters, gives voice to a genocide survivor she left behind in rural Cambodia, her older sister Chou." "Loung was the lucky child, the sibling Eldest Brother chose to take with him to America. The youngest and the scrappiest, she was the one he believed had the best chance of making it. Just two years apart, Chou and Loung had bonded deeply over the deaths of their parents and sisters. As they stood holding hands in their dusty village while the extended family gathered to say good-bye, they never imagined that fifteen years would pass before they would be reunited again." "Ung describes what it is like to survive in a new culture while surmounting dogged memories of genocide and the deep scars of war. Not only must she learn about Disney characters and Christmas trees to fit in with her classmates, she must also come to understand life in a nation of peace: that the Fourth of July fireworks are not bombs and that she doesn't have to hide food in her bed every night to make sure she has enough to eat." "An accomplished activist and writer, Ung has now returned to Cambodia many times, and in this recreation of Chou's life, she writes the story that so easily could have been hers. Both redemptive and searing, Lucky Child highlights the harsh realities of chance and circumstance and celebrates the indomitability of the human spirit."--BOOK JACKET.… (lisätietoja)
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» Katso myös 12 mainintaa

näyttää 5/5
i didn't give it 5 stars cause i felt the ending was rushed, or maybe cause i didn't want it to end. excellent story! ( )
  lloyd1175 | Mar 23, 2014 |
This second book shows the post-traumatic reaction more explicitly, and is more interior and emotional. This may be in part a result of reader feedback, or the growing maturity and self-awareness of the child protagonist, or an adaptation to Western narrative style. Reading In the Shadow of the Banyan, which has been fictionalized from the author's experience, I noticed much more lyricism and emotional depth. I see this as evidence of the shift in genres--fiction allows for a more poetic narrative that is also tidier and less picaresque. Ung, Chanrithy Him, and others relating their Khmer Rouge genocide experiences generally have a tone of reportage and tell the story autobiographically (this happened, then this) rather than as a plot. My guess is that this reflects Cambodian storytelling style for this kind of event.
( )
  OshoOsho | Mar 31, 2013 |
This follow up to "First They Killed My Father" is heartbreaking and beautifully written. Loung Ung is an example of the resilence of the human spirit! ( )
  bookalover89 | Jun 19, 2012 |
I've read a number of books, such as Stay Alive My Son, When Broken Glass Floats, A Long Way Gone, and others, and while being very moved and wrenched by the stories, I was also frustrated as the stories always seemed to end on the plane or in the refugee camp. The narratives always felt as if they were one chapter short, and you are left to ask "What happened next?". It is not as if a magic wand is waved and everything was made alright.

Ung finishes the story where First They Killed My Father" left off. While it is impossible to follow a work as horrific and devastating as her first book, Ung has written her second book to stand on its own, it being emotional and thought provoking. She writes about the parallel lives of herself in the U.S. and her sister in Cambodia during their 15 year separation. While I didn't fit into the story's format at first, as the years moved forward within the pages, I grasped a greater appreciation of the message and the pain she was portraying. Ung depicts herself as awkward, selfish, brandishing brutal thoughts, and just wanting a place to run to and hide. Her honesty has to be respected. War does not end on the battlefield ( )
  Scotland | Dec 16, 2010 |
näyttää 5/5
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (2)

"When Loung Ung came to America in 1980 as a ten-year-old Cambodian refugee, she had already survived years of hunger, violence, and loss at the hands of the Khmer Rouge, a story she told in her bestseller, First They Killed My Father. Now, in Lucky Child, Ung writes of assimilation and, in alternating chapters, gives voice to a genocide survivor she left behind in rural Cambodia, her older sister Chou." "Loung was the lucky child, the sibling Eldest Brother chose to take with him to America. The youngest and the scrappiest, she was the one he believed had the best chance of making it. Just two years apart, Chou and Loung had bonded deeply over the deaths of their parents and sisters. As they stood holding hands in their dusty village while the extended family gathered to say good-bye, they never imagined that fifteen years would pass before they would be reunited again." "Ung describes what it is like to survive in a new culture while surmounting dogged memories of genocide and the deep scars of war. Not only must she learn about Disney characters and Christmas trees to fit in with her classmates, she must also come to understand life in a nation of peace: that the Fourth of July fireworks are not bombs and that she doesn't have to hide food in her bed every night to make sure she has enough to eat." "An accomplished activist and writer, Ung has now returned to Cambodia many times, and in this recreation of Chou's life, she writes the story that so easily could have been hers. Both redemptive and searing, Lucky Child highlights the harsh realities of chance and circumstance and celebrates the indomitability of the human spirit."--BOOK JACKET.

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