KotiRyhmätKeskusteluTutkiAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
SantaThing signup ends Monday at 12pm Eastern US. Check it out!
hylkää
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Stone Butch Blues – tekijä: Leslie…
Ladataan...

Stone Butch Blues (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1993; vuoden 1993 painos)

– tekijä: Leslie Feinberg

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,784347,381 (4.24)52
Published in 1993, this brave, original novel is considered to be the finest account ever written of the complexities of a transgendered existence. Woman or man? That's the question that rages like a storm around Jess Goldberg, clouding her life and her identity. Growing up differently gendered in a blue--collar town in the 1950's, coming out as a butch in the bars and factories of the prefeminist '60s, deciding to pass as a man in order to survive when she is left without work or a community in the early '70s. This powerful, provocative and deeply moving novel sees Jess coming full circle, she learns to accept the complexities of being a transgendered person in a world demanding simple explanations: a he-she emerging whole, weathering the turbulence. Leslie Feinberg is also the author of Trans Liberation, Trans Gender Warriors and Transgender Liberation, and is a noted activist and speaker on transgender issues.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:360YouthServices
Teoksen nimi:Stone Butch Blues
Kirjailijat:Leslie Feinberg
Info:Firbrand Books (1993), Edition: First Edition, Paperback, 304 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:-

Teostiedot

Stone Butch Blues (tekijä: Leslie Feinberg) (1993)

  1. 01
    The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (tekijä: Steven Pinker) (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: From Pinker’s book:

      Nineteen Eighty-four was unforgettable literature, not just a political screed, because of the way Orwell thought through the details of how his society would work. Every component of the nightmare interlocked with the others to form a rich and credible whole: the omnipresent government, the eternal war with shifting enemies, the totalitarian control of the media and private life, the Newspeak language, the constant threat of personal betrayal.

      Less widely known is that the regime had a well-articulated philosophy. It is explained to Winston Smith in the harrowing sequence in which he is strapped to a table and alternately tortured and lectured by the government agent O’Brien. The philosophy of the regime is thoroughly postmodernist, O’Brien explains (without, of course, using the word). When Winston objects that the Party cannot realize its slogan, “Who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past,” O’Brien replies:

        You believe that reality is something objective, external, existing in its own right. You also believe that the nature of reality is self-evident. When you delude yourself into thinking that you see something, you assume that everyone else sees the same thing as you. But I tell you, Winston, that reality is not external. Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else. Not in the individual mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes; only in the mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal.

      O’Brien admits that for certain purposes, such as navigating the ocean, it is useful to assume that the Earth goes around the sun and that there are stars in distant galaxies. But, he continues, the Party could also use alternative astronomies in which the sun goes around the Earth and the stars are bits of fire a few kilometers away. And though O’Brien does not explain it in this scene, Newspeak is the ultimate “prisonhouse of language,” a “language that thinks man and his ‘world.’”

      O’Brien’s lecture should give pause to the advocates of postmodernism. It is ironic that a philosophy that prides itself on deconstructing the accoutrements of power should embrace a relativism that makes challenges to power impossible, because it denies that there are objective benchmarks against which the deceptions of the powerful can be evaluated. For the same reason, the passages should give pause to radical scientists who insist that other scientists’ aspirations to theories with objective reality (including theories about human nature) are really weapons to preserve the interests of the dominant class, gender, and race. Without a notion of objective truth, intellectual life degenerates into a struggle of who can best exercise the raw force to “control the past.”

      A second precept of the Party’s philosophy is the doctrine of the superorganism:

        Can you not understand, Winston, that the individual is only a cell? The weariness of the cell is the vigor of the organism. Do you die when you cut your fingernails?

      The doctrine that a collectivity (a culture, a society, a class, a gender) is a living thing with its own interests and belief system lies behind Marxist political philosophies and the social science tradition begun by [Emile] Durkheim. Orwell is showing its dark side: the dismissal of the individual—the only entity that literally feels pleasure and pain—as a mere component that exists to further the interests of the whole. The sedition of Winston and his lover Julia began in the pursuit of simple human pleasures—sugar and coffee, white writing paper, private conversation, affectionate lovemaking. O’Brien makes it clear that such individualism will not be tolerated: “There will be no loyalty, except loyalty to the Party. There will be no love, except the love of Big Brother.”

      The Party also believes that emotional ties to family and friends are “habits” that get in the way of a smoothly functioning society:

        Already we are breaking down the habits of thought that have survived from before the Revolution. We have cut the links between child and parent, and between man and man, and between man and woman. No one dares trust a wife or a child or a friend any longer. But in the future there will be no wives and no friends. Children will be taken from their mothers at birth, as one takes eggs from a hen. The sex instinct will be eradicated. . . . There will be no distinction between beauty and ugliness.

      It is hard to read the passage and not think of the current enthusiasm for proposals in which enlightened mandarins would reengineer childrearing, the arts, and the relationship between the sexes in an effort to build a better society.
    … (lisätietoja)
  2. 01
    Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America (tekijä: Lillian Faderman) (devrose)
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 52 mainintaa

englanti (31)  espanja (2)  saksa (1)  Kaikki kielet (34)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 34) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I feel like on this website sometimes I get gaslighted by books with really good endings and give them higher ratings than what reflects how i felt for most of the book. So maybe it's egregious to rate a ~classic~ 3/5, but in spite of that I did really like this book!

I guess the most obvious comparison to make would be Rubyfruit Jungle, and not just because both are about butch lesbians in the same era. Both have this Verisimilitudinous level of detail that makes it hard to believe the events in the book didn't really happen... and I think in both cases there's a lot of autobiographical elements to the story. So I respect that a lot, I don't want to know what's real and what isn't because it feels so much like a memoir.

Stone Butch Blues is also way more political than books that try to be, especially anything else I've read on similar subjects. Think... Nevada by Imogen Binnie. In comparison to this one, I really don't care about millenials who live in Brooklyn angst, because Stone Butch Blues is so much more incidentally political just by existing. There were no polemics or soapboxes addressed to the audience that take you out of the narrative, the politics were in the narrative itself. And on top of that, somehow it still covered a lot of ground without trying (gender politics, lesbians, class, race, unions, etc), which is perhaps a testament to intersectional activism that Feinberg lived for.

However it was really long!! So much bad stuff happened it felt like reading Charles Dickens. I know it's a portrait of a historical era and that all this bad stuff really did happen, but at times it felt pretty exhausting to read! Which is not to suggest that it should have been toned down or whitewashed, I'm not really sure what the solution is. The style was at once condensed and drawn out, and I feel like a lot could have been cut for repetition, but at the same time it felt like everything was happening way too fast, one thing after another. A lot was too convenient, sacrificing how real people talk to make a political statement or for melodrama. A lot of the metaphors were so forced too- omg the girl rabbit was actually a boy, I wonder what that could mean!

Anyway I don't mean to be too harsh on this book because it really did make me cry a lot of times. It's just that some of it was hard to read- emotionally and in that it's really really long. The ending made me happy though, and I loooooove Ruth so much! I think this book will stick with me for a very long time. ( )
  jooniper | Sep 10, 2021 |
Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg (2004)
  arosoff | Jul 10, 2021 |
it's rare for me to rate so highly a book with as many problems as this one has. as a novel, it is full of issues. but as a history, and as an explanation, and as a call to action, it is so important. (on that scale it's 5 stars.) it took me a little while (maybe close to 100 pages) to get into the book because of the quality of the writing (not great, and it was disorganized) and probably because of my discomfort with the butch/femme dynamic, but once it started becoming more radical i was able to put all that aside. it's pretty incredible to see the changes in the lgbtq community over the last 60 years. every generation's community would be virtually unrecognizable to the one before or after.

it's so sad to me that leslie didn't live to see where we are now. where the gender binary is being smashed to pieces, where zie'd be accepted without question in our community. (at least, in some places this is true. maybe not yet in the smaller towns zie was living in and writing about.) where the pronoun "they" is becoming more and more common, and people don't have to choose to be or feel male or female; they can be either or neither or go back and forth. i wish leslie could have felt that acceptance, and the pride in knowing zie were a part of making it happen, getting us to this point.

this is also about labor organizing and more, and all of that is super important, but my focus in reading was definitely on gender and presentation and the queer community.

i have never understood the butch/femme thing (a privilege of my generation, i think), but this book shows how brave - how seriously brave and strong - the butches and femmes of the past truly were.

"...I thought how brave she was to have begun this journey, to have withstood the towering judgments."

"Who was I now -- woman or man? That question could never be answered as long as those were the only choices; it could never be answered if it had to be asked."

"'Once upon a time...' She wove a story about a little girl who traveled out into the world to find the sorcerer who would tell her what she was supposed to do with her life. But on the way the girl was confronted by a fire-breathing dragon who blocked her path. She was very frightened by the dragon. 'What shall I do?' the girl cried out. Suddenly she noticed a huge boulder balanced on the cliff above. If she could push the rock, it would fall and kill the dragon. But how could she get up there? The girl called out to an eagle, 'Brother Eagle, please help me slay the dragon!' And the eagle swooped down and lifted the girl up to the cliff. The dragon saw the boulder falling, but it was too late. When the rock crushed the dragon, it disappeared in a cloud of smoke. The girl was very happy, but she was afraid the whole mess had made her late on her journey and now she'd never find the sorcerer. That evening she stopped and camped under a weeping willow beside a river. She started a small fire to cook her hot dogs and went into the forest to find more wood. When she returned, she found the sorcerer sitting by her fire, toasting marshmallows. She knew it was the sorcerer because he was wearing a tall pointed cap with stars and moons on it. So she sat down and asked him, 'Mr. Sorcerer, please tell me what I'm supposed to do with my life.' And the sorcerer smiled and told her, 'You are supposed to slay a dragon.'" ( )
1 ääni overlycriticalelisa | Apr 9, 2021 |
This was nothing short of powerful, and it gave me new understanding and appreciation for our history and my place in it. ( )
  Raiona | Jan 28, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 34) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Feinberg attempts to present Goldberg's life as the personal side of political history, but the narrative seems unattached to time despite the insertion of landmark events like the Stonewall riot and the mention of Reagan and the Moral Majority.
lisäsi DorsVenabili | muokkaaPublishers Weekly (Feb 1, 1993)
 

Lyhennelty täällä:

Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (2)

Published in 1993, this brave, original novel is considered to be the finest account ever written of the complexities of a transgendered existence. Woman or man? That's the question that rages like a storm around Jess Goldberg, clouding her life and her identity. Growing up differently gendered in a blue--collar town in the 1950's, coming out as a butch in the bars and factories of the prefeminist '60s, deciding to pass as a man in order to survive when she is left without work or a community in the early '70s. This powerful, provocative and deeply moving novel sees Jess coming full circle, she learns to accept the complexities of being a transgendered person in a world demanding simple explanations: a he-she emerging whole, weathering the turbulence. Leslie Feinberg is also the author of Trans Liberation, Trans Gender Warriors and Transgender Liberation, and is a noted activist and speaker on transgender issues.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (4.24)
0.5 1
1 2
1.5 1
2 6
2.5 5
3 44
3.5 11
4 111
4.5 13
5 160

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 164,347,143 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä