KotiRyhmätKeskusteluTutkiAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
SantaThing signup ends Monday at 12pm Eastern US. Check it out!
hylkää
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Richard III – tekijä: Laurence Olivier
Ladataan...

Richard III (vuoden 2010 painos)

– tekijä: Laurence Olivier (Actor)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
542389,931 (4.33)1
Begins by recapitulating the final scene of Henry IV, Part III with Edward IV being crowned king. In the background of the celebration, Richard jealously views the proceedings. Soon afterwards, Edward IV is murdered, drowned in a vat of wine. Richard becomes king and, after proceeding with a succession of intrigues and duplicities, he finds his kingdom in dire peril, set upon by Henry Tudor and mustering a final defense for his realm at the Battle of Bosworth. An immortal tale of lust, murder, treachery and the ruthless pursuit of power.… (lisätietoja)
-
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 1 maininta

näyttää 2/2
"Waldstein" provides a brilliant review, touching on many moments in the film which chill one to the bone. No other version brings the Shakespearian arch manipulator Richard, Duke of Gloucester to such vivid life. Olivier obviously takes much of the credit for that, but the Richard III Society may beg to differ as to the accuracy of the portrayal given here. The opening scene, with the medieval chandelier that looks just like a crown looming into view, together with Walton's fine music sets everything up for what is to follow, almost as though it was all fated to happen as it did, and not in any other way. ( )
  comsat38 | Mar 24, 2018 |
Richard III (1955)

Laurence Olivier – Richard III

Ralph Richardson – Buckingham
Claire Bloom – Lady Anne
Helen Haye – Duchess of York
Mary Kerridge – Queen Elizabeth
John Gielgud – Clarence
Alec Clunes – Hastings
Stanley Baker – Richmond
Clive Morton – Rivers

Adapted by Laurence Olivier (uncredited), Colley Cibber and David Garrick.
Directed by Laurence Olivier.

First released, 13 December 1955 (London).

Concorde Home Entertainment, 2010. 152 min. Colour. Mono 1.0. 1.66:1 (16:9 anamorphic).

====================================================

Olivier’s Richard III has come to be regarded as a classic, even though it appears to be less critically acclaimed than his Hamlet (1948) or Henry V (1944). As it might be expected, the movie is a traditional adaptation, closer to filmed theatre than to a full-scale movie, with historical sets and costumes. It’s a sumptuous affair, if a little artificial by our modern and very spoiled standards, shot in vivid Technicolor.

The cuts are the usual ones – Margaret, citizens, etc. – and not very extensive in comparison with other versions. There are, indeed, some charming additions, most notably the beginning with the coronation of Edward IV which gives you an excellent opportunity to get introduced visually to the King, the Queen and the princes. There are also several other substantial re-arrangements. The most imaginative touch is the splitting of the “wooing scene” into two parts, with Anne twice spitting on Richard’s face and his giving her two passionate kisses in the end. On the whole, the changes are ingeniously done. The movie flows as smoothly as a fine performance of the play does.

Additional confusion when comparing the play with the movie may come from the fact that Olivier reportedly used, not just wordless scenes from other plays (such as the opening one which comes from Henry VI, Part III), but even some lines not by Shakespeare at all, such as interpolations by Colley Cibber and David Garrick (both duly credited). Never mind that. On its own, the movie suffers from no structural deficiencies.

Olivier in the title role is unforgettable. The straight and shiny black hair; the large, well-shaped nose; the sly look in the eyes; the brisk movements; the suave gestures: everything seems to fit like the pieces of a puzzle. He delivers the text in a curiously high-pitched, not very pleasant voice, and often rather fast, but nonetheless very fluently, with perfect diction, superb confidence and many subtle inflections. It’s a stunning performance by a great actor of a character who is himself a great actor.

Olivier’s direction is equally fine. My only quibbles are the scarcity of close-ups and the too static presentation of some scenes. That said, there are some imaginative angles and long takes that work wonders. Richard’s opening soliloquy is a case in point. It draws you inside Richard’s head as his confidante like no theatre production ever could. There is a great deal of effective work with lights and shadows throughout the whole movie.

Great moments abound. There are hardly any others. The very first time we see Richard’s face, when he suddenly turns his head towards the camera, is almost scary, as no doubt it was intended to be. Note also the killer look at the younger prince when he makes a joke about Richard’s deformed shoulder, or the malevolent half-lit face when Richard says that his kingdom “stands on brittle glass”. Richard’s demonstration to Tyrrel how to use pillow as a most convenient weapon is a special favourite of mine. Another innovation that fits the play like a glove occurs after the charade with the Lord Mayor and the crowd. Here Richard comes down by the bell rope and, though not yet a king, offers his hand to (the unpleasantly surprised) Buckingham to kiss, and kneel. This also makes the later fallout between them somewhat more credible. The final monologue is unfortunately badly cut, but Richard’s face during the nightmares is positively haunting.

The supporting cast boasts at least two other Shakespearean legends: John Gielgud (Clarence) and Ralph Richardson (Buckingham). The latter is especially memorable as the cunning master of court intrigue; the former is a little stilted in his “dream scene”, but Clarence is not a very grateful part anyway. Claire Bloom (Anne) and Mary Kerridge (Elizabeth) are serviceable rather than memorable.

All in all, a great way to start your video exploration of Richard III. McKellen (1995) and Pacino (1996), whatever their merits, are much more abridged and take much greater liberties with the original. ( )
1 ääni Waldstein | Mar 23, 2018 |
näyttää 2/2
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Olivier, LaurenceDirectorensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Bloom, Clairemuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Gielgud, Johnmuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Hardwicke, Sir Cedricmuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Olivier, LaurenceActormuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Richardson, Ralphmuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Shakespeare, WilliamOriginal playmuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Walton, WilliamSäveltäjämuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu

Kuuluu näihin kustantajien sarjoihin

Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

Begins by recapitulating the final scene of Henry IV, Part III with Edward IV being crowned king. In the background of the celebration, Richard jealously views the proceedings. Soon afterwards, Edward IV is murdered, drowned in a vat of wine. Richard becomes king and, after proceeding with a succession of intrigues and duplicities, he finds his kingdom in dire peril, set upon by Henry Tudor and mustering a final defense for his realm at the Battle of Bosworth. An immortal tale of lust, murder, treachery and the ruthless pursuit of power.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (4.33)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 2
4.5
5 3

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 164,359,317 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä