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Tohtori Živago (1957)

Tekijä: Boris Pasternak

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut / Maininnat
11,567152587 (3.86)2 / 676
Classic Literature. Fiction. Literature. HTML:First published in Italy in 1957 amid international controversy, Doctor Zhivago is the story of the life and loves of a poet/physician during the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. Taking his family from Moscow to what he hopes will be shelter in the Ural Mountains, Zhivago finds himself instead embroiled in the battle between the Whites and the Reds. Set against this backdrop of cruelty and strife is Zhivago's love for the tender and beautiful Lara, the very embodiment of the pain and chaos of those cataclysmic times. Pevear and Volokhonsky masterfully restore the spirit of Pasternak's originalhis style, rhythms, voicings, and tonein this beautiful translation of a classic of world literature.… (lisätietoja)
  1. 20
    All That Is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity (tekijä: Marshall Berman) (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: This is one of my favourite books; it explores themes of modernity, providing a fresh insight moving away from the idea that modernity is about fixed repeated sequences. It works through various texts from Goethe, Marx and Baudelaire, through to works created in St Petersburg by authors living in a time when modernity seemed to be passing them by in another world. This is why I would suggest it to anyone fascinated by Russian literature as it gives a brilliant new perspective on the reasons behind their writing.… (lisätietoja)
  2. 10
    Hope Abandoned (tekijä: Nadezhda Mandelstam) (MeisterPfriem)
    MeisterPfriem: Nadezhda Mandelstam knew personally Pasternak. Her account gives a unique inside to the Russian/USSR society and life under Stalin which is the background to Doctor Zhivago.
  3. 00
    Generations of Winter (tekijä: Vasily Aksyonov) (DelphineM)
1950s (47)
AP Lit (103)
Europe (46)
100 (41)
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Ryhmä ViestiketjuViestitViimeinen viesti 
 Folio Society Devotees: Dr. Zhivago7 lukematonta / 7assemblyman, syyskuu 2022
 Fans of Russian authors: Dr Zhivago23 lukematonta / 23kaggsy, kesäkuu 2018

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 152) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
https://fromtheheartofeurope.eu/doctor-zhivago-by-boris-pasternak/

I first read this at least 35 years ago, possibly longer, and my copy still smells of the mildewy second-hand bookshop where I got it, probably in Cambridge. It’s a great book. There’s a wonderful human story in the transition from the fading empire to the brutality of the Communist regime, with people clinging to what crumbs of comfort they can, especially each other.

Although the title of the book is Doctor Zhivago, it’s just as much Lara’s story; she’s there at the beginning and the end, and has a more complicated life, with the climax of the story coming when three of her lovers end up in the same place at almost the same time. A lot of her story is unstated – for instance, when she is first seduced by Komarovsky, it happens entirely off screen, where most writers today would go into explicit erotic detail about the encounter. But we know perfectly well what has happened.

There is also a tremendous sense of place. Moscow, the steppes, the fictional towns that Yuri and Lara end up living in, are all vividly described, and although if you’re not used to Russian nomenclature you can get lost among the characters (most of whom have at least three completely different modes of address), you can’t get lost among the locations.

I haven’t seen the film (which lost the Best Oscar to The Sound of Music, though it won just as many awards on the night), and given that it’s three hours long, I am a little intimidated; but I really enjoyed revisiting the book after a third of a century. ( )
  nwhyte | Jul 11, 2024 |
The fictional life of a physician and poet during the Russian revolution and civil war
This edition is translated by Nicholas Pasternak Slater, Boris' grandson, bound with poems of Yuri Zhivago with reproductions of paintings and drawings by Leonid Pasternak, Boris' father.
This saga opens with the early years of Zhivago and his friends, growing up in Moscow and the Urals, students from wealthy families. Zhivago is a medical student during the 1905 revolution, witnesses the Cossack charge into the revolutionaries. At the same time, Lara, his love of his later years, is losing her virginity to Komorovsky, a wealthy lawyer. In distress, she shoots and wounds him at a party, but the event is ignored by the wealthy guests. Komorovsky feels guilty and supports Lara's education and work for a seamstress Yuri and Lara meet when she is a nurse, and he a doctor, at the western front in WW1. Lara had gone there to search for her husband Pavel Pavelovich Antipov, a son of the family that owned Varykino, the estate where Zhivago takes refuge later in the novel. Antipov is an ensign in the Russian army, but is reported killed in an assault but surfaces later as a feared revolutionary leader Strelnikov, and still later as a fugitive hunted by the Bolsheviks. At the end of the war, Zhivago returns to Moscow. He had married Tonia, a friend from his youth, and they have two children. Zhivago is working as a hospital doctor, but there is no food or firewood in Moscow after the confiscations of revolutionary socialism. They decide to move to Varykino, an estate near Yuratyn, a town in the Urals, where they had spent summers in their youth. They manage to grow food, and keep themselves warm over a winter, but Lara is living in Yuraytin, and on his frequent trips to the library in town, Zhivago meets her again, and they become lovers. On one of his trips to town, Zhivago is seized by partisans to be their doctor. He is with them in Siberia, surrounded by the White Armies in the taiga. Tonia goes back to Moscow and obtains pernission to emigrate to France with her father and children. Zhivago learns of this only after he escapes the partisans. He arrives back in Yuraytin in rags and starving, but Lara is still there, and they again become lovers. They move to the estate at Varykino for a few weeks, living on potatoes, exchanging rapurous words, until Komarovsky, still caring for Lara, arrives to offer Lara, her daughter, and Zhivago, escape to the far east, where Komarovsky is a high minister. Zhivago obscurely feels it is his duty to go back to Moscow, to find out the fate of his family, and tricks Lara to going to the east with Komorovsky. Pavel Antipov shows up the night Lara leaves, has a long philosophical talk with Zhivago, then shoots himself before the Bolsheviks find him. In the final chapters, Zhivago returns to Moscow, but abandons his medical skills, lives in poverty relieved only by his old friends Gordon and Dudurov, takes a common law wife. He disappears when his brother finds him, to rehabilitate himself, but dies of a heart attack on his way to a new hospital post. Lara somehow walks in on his funeral, and in an epilogue, following Gordon and Dudurov in WW2, Lara's daughter surfaces as a washerwoman for their regiment. She knows nothing of her mother, but Zhivago's brother, now a general, hearing her story, vows to make sure she is educated and cared for.
I took a long time reading this. The many characters each have nicknames, formal names, surnames and diminutives, interchangeable in the text. Pasternak was a poet, and his lyrical language when describing the countryside often clogs the action. The plot is driven by coincidental meetings and unlikely survivals. I would not know how accurate the translation is, but the English prose is awkward and simplified. I suspect there are other translations that flow better. ( )
  neurodrew | Apr 22, 2024 |
This book is very brutal, long and cold - all the things I don't like in a book. Plus, the main character seems very weak and I truly hate adultery. I gave it three stars, because it was well written, I liked some scenes and I loved the poems. ( )
  Donderowicz | Mar 12, 2024 |
I honestly was not sure if I was going to like this when I started reading it. I am so glad that I did not put it down. It was an excellent read. Loved it. ( )
  everettroberts | Oct 20, 2023 |
This is a fine, long novel to curl up with in winter. I love Pasternak's poetic writing. I read the English translation. I understand that it's even more beautiful in Russian. Thanks to Debbie Johnson for introducing me to this novel. Unforgettable. ( )
  MickeyMole | Oct 2, 2023 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 152) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
A la découverte de la littérature russe
Publié en 1958, ce roman n'est autorisé à paraître en URSS qu'en 1985. Cette autorisation est un signe de l'ouverture souhaitée par Mikhaïl Gorbatchev. Le Docteur Jivago dépeint le passage de l'Empire russe à l'URSS, qui s'est traduit par une horrible guerre civile marquant les esprits de toute la population. Un chef-d’œuvre pour découvrir une Sibérie attachante et accueillante.
 
At the beginning of his novel Pasternak deliberately deprives the Zhivago family of its wealth, as a kind of symbolic prelude to the revolution that is to come. Like so much else in the novel it happens as arbitrarily as if in a fairy tale: the rich king suddenly becomes a poor beggar. “There was a Zhivago factory, a Zhivago bank, Zhivago buildings, a Zhivago necktie pin,…and at one time if you said ‘Zhivago’ to your sleigh driver in Moscow, it was as if you had said: ‘Take me to Timbuctoo!’ and he carried you off to a fairy tale kingdom.” This wealth of gold both symbolizes and contrasts with the wealth of life which will be the precious gift and possession of the son, the hero of the novel...

Tossed about like corks in the tumult, people are thrown up against one another in all sorts of unexpected ways and places. The ruthless partisan commander turns out to be the same young officer we used to know, rumored to have been killed in an attack on the Austrian entrenchments in 1916. The old Swiss lady walking past the trolley in which Zhivago has his fatal heart attack was the former governess of a noble Russian whom he had known briefly when they both worked at a hospital during the war. And this final coming together is in any case unknown to both parties, without apparent significance. And yet everything in life has significance, just because it is life, the thing itself, and not the abstract vision of how it ought to be for which the tyrants of ideology drench the world in blood. As Zhivago observes, you must live, you cannot always be making preparations for living—a sharp comment on the Communist promise that everything is going to be wonderful, some day in the future.
lisäsi SnootyBaronet | muokkaaNew York Review of Books, John Bayley (Mar 7, 1991)
 
Those who expect some kind of counter-revolutionary or anti-Soviet journalism from Dr Zhivago will be disappointed. It is not, in that sense, a political novel at all, although it is entirely about the effects of the revolution of 1905, the First World War, the 1917 revolution and the last war, upon a group of families of the upper-class intelligentsia and others. Pasternak is apolitical. His temper is Christian; Marxism is dismissed scornfully as half-baked folly and pomposity...

There is no cliche of invention in Pasternak; there is no eccentricity either. He has the eye of nature. Another refreshing quality is the freedom from the Anglo-American obsession with sex. In love, he is concerned with the heart. It is hard to imagine an English, French or American novel on Pasternak’s subject that would not be an orgy of rape or creeping sexuality.

Dr Zhivago is a great mound of minutely observed particulars and this particularity is, of course, expressive of his central attitude - his stand for private life and integrity.
lisäsi SnootyBaronet | muokkaaNew Yorker, V.S. Pritchett
 
Doctor Zhivago has no doubt been much read—like other books that promise to throw some light on the lives of our opposite numbers in the Soviet Union—out of simple curiosity. But it is not really a book about Russia in the sense that the newspaper accounts of it might lead the reader to expect; it is a book about human life, and its main theme is death and resurrection...

Doctor Zhivago will, I believe, come to stand as one of the great events in man’s literary and moral history. Nobody could have written it in a totalitarian state and turned it loose on the world who did not have the courage of genius. May his guardian angel be with him! His book is a great act of faith in art and in the human spirit.
lisäsi SnootyBaronet | muokkaaNew Yorker, Edmund Wilson
 

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (113 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Pasternak, Borisensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Bayley, JohnJohdantomuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Guerney, Bernard GuilbertKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Hanari, ManyaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Hayward, MaxKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Konkka, JuhaniKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Pasternak Slater, AnnJohdantomuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Pasternak Slater, NicolasKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Pasternak, LeonidKuvittajamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Pevear, RichardKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Prins, AaiKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Reschke, ThomasKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Scheepmaker, NicoKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Slater, MayaToimittajamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Volokhonsky, LarissaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Walter, Reinhold vonKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Zveteremich, PietroKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu

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The fear known as spymania had reduced all speech to a single formal, predictable patter. The display of good intentions in discourse was not conductive to conversation.
After two or three stanzas that came pouring and several metaphors by which he was himself surprised, the work took possession of him, and he began to feel the presence of what is called inspiration. At such moments the correlation of the forces that govern artistic genius have as it were been turned upside down. It is no longer the man and the state of his soul, for which he is seeking expression, that are in the ascendancy now, but the language. his instrument of expression. Language, the home and dwelling of beauty and meaning, itself begins to think and speak for man and turns wholly into music, not in the sense of outward, audible sounds, but by virtue of the power and momentum of its inward flow. Then, like the current of a mighty river polishing stones and turning wheels by its very movement, the flow of speech creates in passing, by the force of its own laws, rhyme and rhythm and countless other forms and formations, still more important and until now undiscovered, unconsidered and unnamed.
The rising sun had cast the long dewy shadow of trees in loops over the park grounds. The shadow was not black but dark gray like wet felt. The heady fragrance of the morning seemed to come from this damp shadow on the ground, with strips of light in it like a girl’s fingers. Suddenly a streak of quicksilver, as shiny as the dew on the grass, flowed by him a few paces away. It flowed on and on and the ground did not absorb it. Then, with an unexpectedly sharp movement, it swerved aside and vanished.
He began to write down the legend of St George and the Dragon in lyrical form. He started with broad, spacious pentameter, but its harmony, derived from the metre itself, and independent of the sense, annoyed him by its slick, humdrum sing-song. He gave up the pompous rhythm and the caesura and cut down the lines to four beats, as you cut out useless words in prose.... The writing was livelier but still too verbose. He forced himself to shorter lines. Now the words were crammed in their tetrameters and he felt wide awake, roused, excited; the right words to fill the shot lines came, prompted by the measure.... He heard the horses' hoofs ringing on the surface of the poem as you hear the trotting of a horse in one of Chopin's Ballades.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (3)

Classic Literature. Fiction. Literature. HTML:First published in Italy in 1957 amid international controversy, Doctor Zhivago is the story of the life and loves of a poet/physician during the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. Taking his family from Moscow to what he hopes will be shelter in the Ural Mountains, Zhivago finds himself instead embroiled in the battle between the Whites and the Reds. Set against this backdrop of cruelty and strife is Zhivago's love for the tender and beautiful Lara, the very embodiment of the pain and chaos of those cataclysmic times. Pevear and Volokhonsky masterfully restore the spirit of Pasternak's originalhis style, rhythms, voicings, and tonein this beautiful translation of a classic of world literature.

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