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The Wind Done Gone – tekijä: Alice…
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The Wind Done Gone (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2001; vuoden 2001 painos)

– tekijä: Alice Randall (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
5452333,555 (2.99)34
In a brilliant rejoinder and an inspired act of literary invention, Alice Randall explodes the world created in Margaret Mitchell's famous 1936 novel, the work that more than any other has defined our image of the antebellum South. Imagine simply that the black characters peopling that world were completely different, not egregious, one-dimensional stereotypes but fully alive, complex human beings. And then imagine, quite plausibly, that at the center of this world moves an illegitimate mulatto woman, and that this woman, Cynara, Cinnamon, or Cindy, beautiful and brown, gets to tell her story. Cindy is born into a world in which she is unacknowledged by her plantation-owning father and passed over by her mother in favor of her white charges. Sold off like so much used furniture, she eventually makes her way back to Atlanta to take up with a prominent white businessman, only to leave him for an aspiring politician of her own color. Moving from the Deep South to the exhilarating freedom of Reconstruction Washington, with its thriving black citizenry of statesmen, professionals, and strivers of every persuasion, Cindy experiences firsthand the promise of the new era at its dizzying peak, just before it begins to slip away. Alluding to events in Mitchell's novel but ingeniously and ironically transforming them, The Wind Done Gone is an exquisitely written, emotionally complex story of a strong, resourceful black woman breaking away from the damaging world of the Old South to emerge into her own, a person capable of not only receiving but giving love, as daughter, lover, and mother. A passionate love story, a wrenching portrait of a tangled mother-daughter relationship, and a book that gives a voice to those history has silenced, The Wind Done Gone is an elegant literary achievement of significant political force and a novel whose time has finally come.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Maya47Bob46
Teoksen nimi:The Wind Done Gone
Kirjailijat:Alice Randall (Tekijä)
Info:Houghton MIfflin Company. New York. (2001), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:Fiction, Parody

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

The Wind Done Gone (tekijä: Alice Randall) (2001)

  1. 10
    Tuulen viemää (tekijä: Margaret Mitchell) (lquilter)
    lquilter: This work is a "retelling" of Gone With the Wind, from the perspective of Scarlett's half-sister -- who is a slave. The Mitchell estate chose to sue for copyright infringement, but lost because the court recognized that this work is an important critical commentary on the original, and the beliefs that animated the original.… (lisätietoja)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 23) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
The caveats: I am a white male, American by birth, though I grew up in a different culture than American. Thus I don't know that I have much right to speak to this book. But this is Library Thing, and I'm a reviewer, and therefore I will.

I loved it. I loved Gone with the Wind, both the movie and the book. I thought it one of the most romantic movies of all time. I still do. But I must confess I was somewhat clueness to the reality of the situation before reading The Wind Done Gone. Certainly, I nodded to the concept that there would be a different experience for black slaves, and that that is not well-addressed in Gone with the Wind. But until now, I didn't realize this as fully. The Wind Done Gone helps me to see the African-Americans of the novel as real people, and I must say even the minor white characters of The Wind Done Gone are enfleshed more fully than those of Gone With the Wind. Rhett Butler, despite his claims in Gone With the Wind, is well-known to be the only true gentleman of the novel and movie. He is the good guy, the one we root for. Scarlet O'Hara is, in contrast, quite annoying. But here, in The Wind Done Gone, we get to see that Rhett, also, is a product of the white hegemony of the South. He certainly cares for Cynara a great deal, and he treats her better than most any other whites would, even to the point of marrying her, but ultimately, she is still exotic Other to him, and not simply a wondrous human. Indeed, after years together, after marriage, he still doesn't know her name- because he never asked.

Gone With the Wind is the better romance of the two, by far. It moves in that sense. The Wind Done Gone is the more realistic portrayal. And it does not have the happiness and joy of Gone With the Wind (minus the ending, of course). But let's be honest. There was more happiness and joy in antebellum South for white folks than there was for black folks. And thus I am glad to know this world better, thanks to this novel. ( )
  Carosaari | Jul 13, 2019 |
Very interesting to read along with/after Gone with the Wind. ( )
  SMBrick | Feb 25, 2018 |
The premise for THE WIND DONE GONE was so promising, yet it turns out not to be powerful or even appealing.

It overflows with digressions, underdeveloped characters, and none that were compelling or intriguing. ( )
  m.belljackson | Oct 10, 2017 |
(14) I have meant to read this since it came out, though I was afraid it would spoil the most treasured book of my youth. It certainly didn't spoil it, but it also didn't hold a candle to GWTW. Though I understand GWTW is whitewashed and culturally insensitive, it is still magical. I have lived my life by 'Other's' credo: "I won't think of this right now, I will think of it tomorrow. Tomorrow's another day." This is Scarlett's mulatto half-sister - the love-child of Mammy and Scarlett's father called 'Planter' in this novel.

Much of the writing was in vernacular. Cynara was conflicted between her two identities, at times she wrote like a former slave and at times she wrote like an educated woman. I, indeed, loved the revelations and some of the deeper questions these revelations raised. What does it mean to be black? Is it a color, a state of mind, or a legacy? The reason for the lukewarm rating is the attempt at lyricism in the writing. These almost nonsensical sentences repeated again and again hinting at some truth that seemed either histrionic, obvious, or too elusive to grasp. The only writers I know that really pull this off are Toni Morrison and Faulkner. Here it felt contrived and annoying. Sometimes you just have to tell a story and dispense with too many attempts to make everything swim with meaning and profundity.

I enjoyed this to some degree but was glad when it ended. If the characters had not been based on GWTW it would be a 2 star rating. ( )
  jhowell | Mar 18, 2017 |
This is the first work of revisionist literature I've ever read. It's not really a parody (which they must have had to call it for legal reasons, after Margaret Mitchell's estate sued to stop its publication) or even a pastiche of Gone With the Wind. Just as revisionist history describes historical events from the perspective of those usually left out of the story, this book re-imagines some of the characters in GWTW as seen through the eyes of Scarlett O'Hara's illegitimate mixed race half sister, imagined by Randall as the child of O'Hara and Mammy. It's a brave and wild idea, a kind of creative re-purposing, and GWTW's endemic racism fully deserves the take down it gets here. But TWDG doesn't completely fly as an extended work--it needs more stories to be told in-depth, maybe more voices besides the narrator's to really go head to head with Mitchell's epic fantasy of the noble Confederacy. Still, it's one of those books that, now that it exists, seems essential. Amazing that it has the power to make GWTW fans uncomfortable, even today. Lotta denial still swirling around out there, maybe. ( )
2 ääni CSRodgers | May 3, 2014 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 23) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

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Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
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Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Non Sum Qualis Eram Bonae Sub Regno Cynarae.
Last night, ah, yesternight, betwixt her lips and mine
there fell thy shadow, Cynara! thy breath was shed
Upon my soul between the kisses and the wine;
And I was desolate and sick of an old passion,
Yea, I was desolate and bowed my head:
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

All night upon mine heart I felt her warm heart beat,
Night-long within mine arms in love and sleep she lay;
Sure the kisses of her bought red mouth were sweet;
But I was desolate and sick of an old passion,
When I awoke and found the dawn was gray:
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind,
Flung roses, roses riotously with the throng,
Dancing, to put thy pale, lost lilies out of mind;
But I was desolate and sick of an old passion,
Yea, all the time, because the dance was long:
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

I cried for madder music and for stronger wine,
But when the feast is finished and the lamps expire,
Then falls thy shadow, Cynara! the night is thine;
And I am desolate and sick of an old passion,
Yea, hungry for the lips of my desire
I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion.

Ernest Dowson, 1867-1900 (title from Horace's Odes, translates: I am not as I was under the reign of the good Cynara)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Today is the anniversary of my birth.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
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(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

In a brilliant rejoinder and an inspired act of literary invention, Alice Randall explodes the world created in Margaret Mitchell's famous 1936 novel, the work that more than any other has defined our image of the antebellum South. Imagine simply that the black characters peopling that world were completely different, not egregious, one-dimensional stereotypes but fully alive, complex human beings. And then imagine, quite plausibly, that at the center of this world moves an illegitimate mulatto woman, and that this woman, Cynara, Cinnamon, or Cindy, beautiful and brown, gets to tell her story. Cindy is born into a world in which she is unacknowledged by her plantation-owning father and passed over by her mother in favor of her white charges. Sold off like so much used furniture, she eventually makes her way back to Atlanta to take up with a prominent white businessman, only to leave him for an aspiring politician of her own color. Moving from the Deep South to the exhilarating freedom of Reconstruction Washington, with its thriving black citizenry of statesmen, professionals, and strivers of every persuasion, Cindy experiences firsthand the promise of the new era at its dizzying peak, just before it begins to slip away. Alluding to events in Mitchell's novel but ingeniously and ironically transforming them, The Wind Done Gone is an exquisitely written, emotionally complex story of a strong, resourceful black woman breaking away from the damaging world of the Old South to emerge into her own, a person capable of not only receiving but giving love, as daughter, lover, and mother. A passionate love story, a wrenching portrait of a tangled mother-daughter relationship, and a book that gives a voice to those history has silenced, The Wind Done Gone is an elegant literary achievement of significant political force and a novel whose time has finally come.

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