KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

The Measure of All Things: The Seven-Year Odyssey and Hidden Error That Transformed the World (2002)

Tekijä: Ken Alder

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,0141920,914 (3.77)19
In June 1792, the erudite and cosmopolitan Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre and the cautious and scrupulous Pierre-Francois-Andre Mechain set out from Paris -- one north to Dunkirk, the other south to Barcelona to calculate the length of the meter. In the face of death threats from village revolutionary councils, superstitious peasants, and civil war, they had only their wits and their letters to each other for support. Their findings would be used to create what we now know as the metric system. Despite their painstaking and Herculean efforts, Mechain made a mistake in his calculations that he covered up. The guilty knowledge of his error drove him to the brink of madness, and in the end, he died in an attempt to correct himself. Only then was his mistake discovered. Delambre decided to seal all evidence of the error in a vault at the Paris Observatory. Two hundred year later, historian Ken Alder discovered the truth. With scintillating prose and wry wit, Alder uses these previously overlooked letters, diaries, and journals to bring to life a remarkable time when everything was open to question and the light of reason made every dream seem possible.… (lisätietoja)
-
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin nähdäksesi, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 19 mainintaa

englanti (17)  ranska (2)  Kaikki kielet (19)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 19) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I asked for this book because I wanted to learn more about the development of the metric system and found so much more in it.

Other than the herculean effort it took to try and "measure" a portion of a meridian, it was the story of Méchain's struggles that helped me get a better understanding of the origin of the scientific concept of "precision". He couldn't understand why repeat measurements would yield different results and died thinking he had committed a serious scientific error that he was ashamed to reveal. ( )
  alan_chem | Feb 28, 2023 |
This is the true story of two French scientists who triangulated their way up and down the meridian crossing France - during the French Revolution, no less - in order to determine a precise length for the meter. The author, in researching all of this, discovered that not only was there an error in their measurements - rather than being a set one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole, the first meter was about 200 micrometers too short to meet that definition - but that they had known about it and covered it up. This should be a fascinating book, but to be honest, it was dry almost to the point of being unreadable. I kept having to go back and reread paragraphs over and over again. Finally, a few chapters in, I gave up.
  melydia | Aug 11, 2018 |
Ce professeur d'histoire américain a écrit ici une oeuvre magistrale. Il s'est permis de refaire le trajet à vélo des deux astronomes, Delambre et Méchain. De Paris, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre quittait vers le nord et Pierre-François-André Méchain prenait le chemin du sud. Leur objectif mesurer le monde ou, tout du moins, une partie du méridien terrestre de Dunkerque à Barcelone en passant par Paris. Cela donne un ouvrage historique plein d'humanisme où on comprend mieux l'attachement que les communautés avaient aux mesures «variables» de l'Ancien Régime, où on sent le désespoir d'un homme face à l'erreur, où les savants deviennent des scientifiques, où la mesure de la Terre devient mesure des hommes. Cette incursion dans l'histoire du mètre et de la Révolution qui l'a vu naître était une aventure palpitante.
[http://rivesderives.blogspot.ca/2016/04/mesurer-le-monde-lincroyable-histoire.html] ( )
  GIEL | Apr 20, 2016 |
Une merveilleuse enquête pleine de rigueur et d'esprit sur une évidence... tout sauf évidente. ( )
  Nikoz | May 12, 2015 |
In 1792, the French Academy of Sciences appointed two respected scientists to survey a north-south meridian from Dunkirk to Barcelona, for the purpose of determining the size (and shape) of the earth. Why is this important? Because it would establish an international basis for the meter, foundation of the metric system. It was expected that the work would be finished in about a year, but the expeditions, led by Pierre Francois Andre Méchain and Jean Baptiste Joseph Delambre, which were carried out amidst the chaos of the French Revolution, outlasted both the Academy and the monarchy. Ken Alder has located the lost correspondence between these two, and has discovered the surprising fact that Méchain’s guilt over the possibility of a critical error in a measurement near the southern end of the meridian led him to agonizing self-doubt that brought him close to what we would call a nervous breakdown and almost prevented his completion of the project (about seven years later than first expected). ( )
  hcubic | Jan 27, 2013 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 19) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
The Measure of All Things is one of the finest narrative histories I have ever read. It is beautifully written throughout, endlessly informative and meticulously documented. . . The result of this diligence, and Alder's brilliance as a writer, is a book which thrills at every level. It is at once a historical detective story, a marvellous demonstration of how science and its social context animate one another, a human drama of the highest order and a parable which proves that - as Protagoras put it 25 centuries ago - 'man is the measure of all things'.
 

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (6 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Ken Alderensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetlaskettu
Devillers-Argouarc'h… MartineKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Teoksen kanoninen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Fabrice showed them his passport indicating he was a barometer salesman travelling with his wares. "This goes too far!" - Stendhal, The Charterhouse of Parma
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
For Bronwyn and Madeline

It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot ranskankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
En juin 1792, alors que la monarchie française vivait ses derniers jours et que la Terre commençait à tourner autour du nouvel axe de l'égalité révolutionnaire, deux astronomes partaient dans des directions opposées, dans une quête extraordinaire.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen kieli
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC
In June 1792, the erudite and cosmopolitan Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre and the cautious and scrupulous Pierre-Francois-Andre Mechain set out from Paris -- one north to Dunkirk, the other south to Barcelona to calculate the length of the meter. In the face of death threats from village revolutionary councils, superstitious peasants, and civil war, they had only their wits and their letters to each other for support. Their findings would be used to create what we now know as the metric system. Despite their painstaking and Herculean efforts, Mechain made a mistake in his calculations that he covered up. The guilty knowledge of his error drove him to the brink of madness, and in the end, he died in an attempt to correct himself. Only then was his mistake discovered. Delambre decided to seal all evidence of the error in a vault at the Paris Observatory. Two hundred year later, historian Ken Alder discovered the truth. With scintillating prose and wry wit, Alder uses these previously overlooked letters, diaries, and journals to bring to life a remarkable time when everything was open to question and the light of reason made every dream seem possible.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Current Discussions

-

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.77)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 2
2.5 2
3 25
3.5 7
4 34
4.5 5
5 21

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 208,644,931 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä