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An Insider's View of Mormon Origins –…
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An Insider's View of Mormon Origins (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2002; vuoden 2002 painos)

– tekijä: Grant Palmer (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
87-247,136 (4.05)1
"The author of this exceptionally clear & thoroughly documented book is an active, fourth-generation Mormon, a 34-year professional historian and Mormon-studies director at college-level religious institutes. From the Preface: 'I, along with colleagues, and drawing from years of research, find the evidence employed to support many traditional [official Mormon] claims about the [Mormon] church to be either nonexistent or problematic.' Chap. 1: (Joseph Smith as Translator/Revelator) concludes that Jos. Smith 'mistranslated a number of documents' including the Book of Abraham, used the King James Bible extensively in constructing the Book of Mormon, also weaving in many 19th century concerns, and that the Book of Mormon is of 'no value in trying to learn more about ancient America or the Middle East.' Chap. 2: (Authorship of the Book of Mormon) concludes that the Book of Mormon is most likely a 19th-century production pieced together from sources demonstrated to be available to Smith, and therefore not a translation from ancient metal plates which, in any case, were not used and often not even present during dictation to scribes, done by looking not at plates but into a hat with a stone placed in it, often separated from his scribe by a blanket hung between them. This chapter also mentions DNA evidence demonstrating that the origin of Native Americans is not as claimed in the Book of Mormon. Chap. 3: (The Bible in the Book of Mormon) demonstrates the King James Bible as source for numerous reworked Book of Mormon stories, many anachronisms and King James translators' errors copied in this erroneous form into the Book of Mormon. Quote: 'Why would God reveal to Joseph Smith a faulty [mistranslated] KJV text?' Chap 4: (Evangelical Protestantism in the Book of Mormon) concludes that numerous theological issues addressed in the Book of Mormon probably derived from Smith's Upstate New York religious environment than from the claimed ancient gold plates. Chap 5: (Moroni and the Golden Pot) examines a long list of parallels between a published story by E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Smith's account of the angel Moroni's visits. The chapter concludes, 'It would stretch credulity to believe that this [long list of parallels between Hoffmann's Golden Pot story and Smith's Moroni story] could be a coincidence, and I therefore think that a debt is owed to E.T.A. Hoffmann and the European traditions ... ' Chap. 6: (Witnesses to the Golden Plates) concludes that, despite the LDS Church's current claims, the evidence shows that none of the eleven witnesses claimed to have actually seen the physical gold plates, instead visualizing them 'with spiritual eyes' in a prayer-induced trance state. Chap. 7: (Priesthood Restoration) concludes that Smith's claim to have been personally ordained by John the Baptist, Peter, James and John as resurrected beings, was not at all what Smith originally claimed, but instead evolved over a number of years from the original claim that didn't involve any beings such as the above four New Testament figures. Chap. 8: (The First Vision) concludes that the LDS Church's official claim that Joseph Smith claimed to have been visited by God the Father and Jesus Christ as two separate beings 'is not supported by the historical evidence' either in the number of beings alleged seen or in the year and circumstances as now officially claimed"--Amazon.com.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:justinhurst223
Teoksen nimi:An Insider's View of Mormon Origins
Kirjailijat:Grant Palmer (Tekijä)
Info:Signature Books (2002), Edition: First Edition, 296 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
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An Insider's View of Mormon Origins (tekijä: Grant H. Palmer) (2002)

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"Prying into Palmer"
And yet, after blasting away at Joseph Smith’s prophetic truth claims and trying to explain the Book of Mormon as nineteenth-century fiction fabricated by a clever liar, he makes the following remark: “I cherish Joseph Smith’s teachings on many topics, such as the plan of salvation and his view that the marriage covenant extends beyond death” (p. 261). Is he serious? If he is, then he has neglected to explain why he would cherish something taught, as he has argued passionately, by a charlatan who lied about having had any genuinely divine, special revelations.
 
This book is something of a watershed in the study of Mormon history and Mormon scripture. It is the first significant popularization of evidence by a writer within the Church indicating that Joseph Smith's ancient scriptures are in fact not ancient and that some of Smith's founding visionary experiences are to be understood differently from how they are taught in traditional contexts. While this volume lacks the depth to be the definitive introduction to these matters, it is a good starting place for the unfamiliar and even provides experts with observations of substance.
 
Those who are interested in Mormonism, whether "inside the fold" or not, are indebted to Grant Palmer for producing a readable, well-documented survey of the critical historical problems related to the origins of Mormonism. I will be assigning it for my freshmen students in Latter Day Saint History this fall.
 

However, Palmer stated that his audience is "church members [LDS] who have not followed the developments in church history during the last thirty years." His goals are to: (1) introduce the New Mormon History, and (2) provide an understanding of "historians and religious teachers like myself." For such an ambitious purpose, the book is seriously flawed.
...
While the traditional story of the origins of Mormonism may no longer suffice, Palmer has made no attempt to reinterpret or present a balanced historical account. Church members who are unfamiliar with current historical methodology will not be able to sift through Palmer's mass of data because of a lack of balance in several areas...
 
Instead, Palmer expresses the view of one who has put so much time and effort into teaching the history and doctrine of the Church, and then discovered that these needed some clarification. There is a profound sadness that undergirds the entire book. And Palmer, I think, wants to ensure that his readers are ready to grow beyond what they learned, perhaps, in his own Institute classes...
...
Much of the material is familiar; some of it was new to me and was welcome. This book will serve the new student of these new views of Mormon history very nicely. It is written on a popular level, and gives readers enough background material to enable them to decide the issues for themselves.
 
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC
"The author of this exceptionally clear & thoroughly documented book is an active, fourth-generation Mormon, a 34-year professional historian and Mormon-studies director at college-level religious institutes. From the Preface: 'I, along with colleagues, and drawing from years of research, find the evidence employed to support many traditional [official Mormon] claims about the [Mormon] church to be either nonexistent or problematic.' Chap. 1: (Joseph Smith as Translator/Revelator) concludes that Jos. Smith 'mistranslated a number of documents' including the Book of Abraham, used the King James Bible extensively in constructing the Book of Mormon, also weaving in many 19th century concerns, and that the Book of Mormon is of 'no value in trying to learn more about ancient America or the Middle East.' Chap. 2: (Authorship of the Book of Mormon) concludes that the Book of Mormon is most likely a 19th-century production pieced together from sources demonstrated to be available to Smith, and therefore not a translation from ancient metal plates which, in any case, were not used and often not even present during dictation to scribes, done by looking not at plates but into a hat with a stone placed in it, often separated from his scribe by a blanket hung between them. This chapter also mentions DNA evidence demonstrating that the origin of Native Americans is not as claimed in the Book of Mormon. Chap. 3: (The Bible in the Book of Mormon) demonstrates the King James Bible as source for numerous reworked Book of Mormon stories, many anachronisms and King James translators' errors copied in this erroneous form into the Book of Mormon. Quote: 'Why would God reveal to Joseph Smith a faulty [mistranslated] KJV text?' Chap 4: (Evangelical Protestantism in the Book of Mormon) concludes that numerous theological issues addressed in the Book of Mormon probably derived from Smith's Upstate New York religious environment than from the claimed ancient gold plates. Chap 5: (Moroni and the Golden Pot) examines a long list of parallels between a published story by E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Smith's account of the angel Moroni's visits. The chapter concludes, 'It would stretch credulity to believe that this [long list of parallels between Hoffmann's Golden Pot story and Smith's Moroni story] could be a coincidence, and I therefore think that a debt is owed to E.T.A. Hoffmann and the European traditions ... ' Chap. 6: (Witnesses to the Golden Plates) concludes that, despite the LDS Church's current claims, the evidence shows that none of the eleven witnesses claimed to have actually seen the physical gold plates, instead visualizing them 'with spiritual eyes' in a prayer-induced trance state. Chap. 7: (Priesthood Restoration) concludes that Smith's claim to have been personally ordained by John the Baptist, Peter, James and John as resurrected beings, was not at all what Smith originally claimed, but instead evolved over a number of years from the original claim that didn't involve any beings such as the above four New Testament figures. Chap. 8: (The First Vision) concludes that the LDS Church's official claim that Joseph Smith claimed to have been visited by God the Father and Jesus Christ as two separate beings 'is not supported by the historical evidence' either in the number of beings alleged seen or in the year and circumstances as now officially claimed"--Amazon.com.

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