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Hiroshima

– tekijä: John Hersey

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,903326,698 (4.13)165
”Elokuun 6. pںaivںanںa vuonna 1945 Yhdysvallat pudotti atomipommin Hiroshimaan. Seuraavana vuonna amerikkalainen John Hersey kirjoitti raporttiromaanin tuon pںaivںan ja lںahiviikkojen tapahtumista. Epںatietoisuus tuhon aiheuttajasta, uudenlaisten vammojen pelottavuus, tںaydellinen kaaos ja ennen kaikkea ennen nںakemںatںon mںaںarںa kuolonuhreja varjostavat kuuden pںaںahenkilںon yritystںa selviytyںa, edes jollain tavalla. Kirja ilmestyi jo vuonna 1946 The New Yorker lehden erikoisnumerona, ja se suomennettiin ensimmںaisen kerran vuonna 1947. John Hersey palasi Hiroshimaan liki neljںan vuosikymmenen jںalkeen etsimںaںan kirjansa pںaںahenkilںoitںa. Uutena suomennoksena julkaistavan laitoksen pitkںa viimeinen luku kertoo nںaiden hibakushien elںamںantarinoiden loppuosan, kehityksen vuoden nolla jںalkeen. Hiroshiman traumasta toipumiseen kytkeytyvںat Japanin muuttuminen, kylmںa sota sekںa ydinteknologian kehittyminen ja leviںaminen. Teos tarjoaa historiallisen nںakںokulman sekںa inhimilliseen kںarsimykseen ettںa ihmiskunnan yllںa leijuvaan ydinuhkaan. Sotakirjallisuuden klassikkojen tavoin Hiroshima on jںarisyttںavںa puheenvuoro rauhan puolesta.” -- (takakansi)… (lisätietoja)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 32) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
A book that should be read. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ended the Second World War. This book is about the experience of six survivors of Hiroshima. It describes their lives from before the explosion until one year later. All were diminished in quality. The stories tell of unimaginable conditions forced upon people unprepared for them. And the author raises questions about the ethics of nuclear war. I pray that this never happens again. ( )
  TomMcGreevy | Sep 11, 2021 |
After reading [b:Fallout: The Hiroshima Cover-up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World|52764193|Fallout The Hiroshima Cover-up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World|Lesley M.M. Blume|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1576421390l/52764193._SY75_.jpg|73727728], I had to go back and read the book that it talked about. Somehow, I'd missed this book in all my years of reading.

I'm glad I corrected that.

This is a horrible book, but there's an undercurrent of tenaciousness and hope that carries it. There's so many enlightening, incredibly human moments, that make the book more bearable. And while there's not a lot of direct finger pointing at Americans, there is an incredible disparity between the reactions of those who survived the Hiroshima bombing, and those who were responsible for it.

Fantastic, important book. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
The power of this short book grows out of the simple virtues of honest reporting and clear writing. Hersey does not sensationalize. He traveled, as an American, to Hiroshima within a year of the blast. To get a handle on an unprecedented event with an immense scale, the author focused on six survivors; most of the text recounts their experiences: what they saw, what they felt, what they thought. He constructs the narrative with skill, interweaving each of these six strands. In the course of the book, he brings in some of the larger picture, such as the number of the dead. Only at the end does he raise the topic of the morality of the act; even here, he reports what his six interviewees think.
In addition to the inherent emotional effect of the tale, there was an added poignancy for me. My copy is a first edition, inherited from my father, who bought it when it came out, shortly after his discharge. When the bomb was detonated, he was on Okinawa and knew that, just as when that island was taken, he would be in the first wave sent ashore when the invasion of the home islands began. The fateful decision to use this bomb, and a second one a few days later at Nagasaki, was taken on the basis of the number of likely casualties, American and Japanese, that such an invasion would bring. Which of these alternatives was the lesser evil is a question that can probably never be decided to the satisfaction of all. The only way to reframe it, as far as I can see, would be to ask whether the demand for unconditional surrender, an appropriate demand in the case of Nazi Germany, was as necessary in the case of Japan, and if this would have obviated the need to choose between invasion and the nuclear option. But of course, we can never know how the next decades would have unfolded if that had been tried. As I write, more than seventy years later, the United States remains the only power to employ an atomic weapon. It would be nice to be able to believe none will ever again be detonated. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
In the West our cultural products tend to focus disproportionately on our own tragedies. Our great battles from World War Two and the Holocaust have a special place. Canadians are periodically offered new treatments on Vimy, the Somme etc. All this is right and good. National imaginaries must be constructed. We must remember for never again to have meaning. And so while we recognise the Armenian genocide, Rwanda, Congo, colonialism etc, we don't hold them up with great pride of place in constant cultural reproduction and examination. And those dark-stained moments that shame the Western conscience tend to be examined even less.

So it was refreshing to read this treatment of the horror of the first atomic bomb attack. This little book has pride of place on the matter in English language bookshops. It is incredibly moving. But I only gave it four stars instead of five because there is something missing. What is it?

Surely so soon after the war, a Japanese perspective on Hiroshima would have been too much for The New Yorker to print. So Hershey takes a clinical journalistic approach. Without frills or melodrama. Without excessive personalisation. By preparing his treatment of the subject in such a way one assumes he is protecting himself from possible accusations of anti-American bias. Just the facts. A plain recounting. It reads like a case report for a judicial enquiry.

So moving as it is, it is because the plain facts are so moving. And this, of course, would easily serve as a narrative defence - that the facts are moving enough on their own, that they need no embellishment, etc. Thus avoiding completely the need to acknowledge that Hiroshima has been treated differently for not being anglo-saxon. The author even manages to cut himself out of the script, letting the subjects voices speak for themselves, we can imagine the argument. And yet they are not speaking for themselves. They are speaking through John Hersey's filter.

One wonders what the story could have read like if the author had personalised more, made more of a story, dramatise more; As if the victims were Westerners and those who launched the bomb from afar.

There is something limiting about this clinical factual reading. As compassionate and brave as Hersey is being, and this is perceived by his clinical approach, one would not need to be so consciously compassionate and brave if the victims were anglo-saxons.

This is fantastic gateway into Hiroshima, and yet it is as if there is no more archive. This book composes the entirety of the Western archive on Hiroshima. It seems strange it is so featured in out bookshops, but never alongside a Japanese voice. How many decades later I find it hard to believe there is no Japanese accessible personal voice on Hiroshima available in translation?

As good as Hersey is. We ought to be able to do better still. ( )
  GeorgeHunter | Sep 13, 2020 |
Yesterday, August 7th, 2020, I re-read this short but detailed classic of six eyewitness experiences of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. I was amazed at how garbled my memory of it was and that I hadn't even remembered the back and forth narratives of the six eye witnesses. My main memory was of the experiences of the Japanese Methodist pastor and the German Jesuit priest. I had even melded these two into one character as the years had passed. About halfway through the book it dawned on me. Just as I was now reading Hersey's classic the day after the 75th anniversary of the ushering in of the atomic ago, I had originally read the book because of the 50th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing. At age 49, that is more than half a lifetime ago! How important it is to re-read important books. The journalistic style makes the telling very powerful. The six characters lives, an office clerk, two doctors, two clergy, and a widow with young children, move back and forth in a readable, understandable and yet bewildering style. They are all confused, scared, horrified, curious and yet strangely calm. The level of destruction and human suffering is like nothing they have ever seen or even imagined. Perhaps, the most graphically powerful image is that of the German Kleinsorge offering a hand to help a burn victim only to have the skin slip off like a glove. The most spiritually haunting moment may be the first time the injured office clerk, Sasaki is able to see firsthand the center of Hiroshima towards the end of August. While she was clearly horrified it was the "blanket of fresh, vivid, lush, optimistic, green" and Sickle Senna at the center of the blast, as if with the bomb came also a shower of seeds, "that particularly gave her the creeps." Like a great journalist, Hersey presents the findings of Japanese doctors, researchers, scientists and statisticians. The stages of radiation sickness are explained. The methods for calculating actual death tolls compared to "official numbers" is covered. Japanese scientists uncovered the details of the size, power and temperature of the atomic bomb even though mention of the atomic bomb was theoretically banned from scientific publications in Japan during the Allied occupation. It's a shame this was not required reading while I was in high school. Even though I read it on my own as a young twenty something, I obviously put it down without the communal discussion that is so necessary for this topic. Hersey does not present an opinion about the morality of the bomb but he presents the process that some of his witnesses and the Japanese people went through to come to grips with the fact of the atomic bomb. Fatalism seemed to be the most common feeling. Hopefully, by writing this review I can finally contribute to the public discussion and encourage others to read this very important work. If you start reading it on a free weekend evening, you will be finished reading by the next morning. God willing you will not be able to stop thinking and feeling the reality of the atomic age before you go back to work on Monday. ( )
  riskedom | Aug 8, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 32) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä (17 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
John Herseyensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetlaskettu
Asner, EdwardKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Belmont, GeorgesTraductionmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Biggs, GeoffreyKansikuvataiteilijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Guidall, GeorgeKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Haas, PascaleTraductionmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
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Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
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Tärkeät paikat
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Tärkeät tapahtumat
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Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
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Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
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At exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning, on August 6, 1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.
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(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
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Please distinguish between John Hersey's original Work, Hiroshima (1946), and his "New Edition With a Final Chapter Written Forty Years After the Explosion" (1985).
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (2)

”Elokuun 6. pںaivںanںa vuonna 1945 Yhdysvallat pudotti atomipommin Hiroshimaan. Seuraavana vuonna amerikkalainen John Hersey kirjoitti raporttiromaanin tuon pںaivںan ja lںahiviikkojen tapahtumista. Epںatietoisuus tuhon aiheuttajasta, uudenlaisten vammojen pelottavuus, tںaydellinen kaaos ja ennen kaikkea ennen nںakemںatںon mںaںarںa kuolonuhreja varjostavat kuuden pںaںahenkilںon yritystںa selviytyںa, edes jollain tavalla. Kirja ilmestyi jo vuonna 1946 The New Yorker lehden erikoisnumerona, ja se suomennettiin ensimmںaisen kerran vuonna 1947. John Hersey palasi Hiroshimaan liki neljںan vuosikymmenen jںalkeen etsimںaںan kirjansa pںaںahenkilںoitںa. Uutena suomennoksena julkaistavan laitoksen pitkںa viimeinen luku kertoo nںaiden hibakushien elںamںantarinoiden loppuosan, kehityksen vuoden nolla jںalkeen. Hiroshiman traumasta toipumiseen kytkeytyvںat Japanin muuttuminen, kylmںa sota sekںa ydinteknologian kehittyminen ja leviںaminen. Teos tarjoaa historiallisen nںakںokulman sekںa inhimilliseen kںarsimykseen ettںa ihmiskunnan yllںa leijuvaan ydinuhkaan. Sotakirjallisuuden klassikkojen tavoin Hiroshima on jںarisyttںavںa puheenvuoro rauhan puolesta.” -- (takakansi)

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