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The Coming Generational Storm: What You Need to Know about America's…

– tekijä: Laurence J. Kotlikoff

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1786116,336 (4.04)2
One of Library Journal's Best Business Books of 2004, Winner in the category of Economics in the 2004 Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. and CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title for 2004 In 2030, as 77 million baby boomers hobble into old age, walkers will outnumber strollers; there will be twice as many retirees as there are today but only 18 percent more workers. How will America handle this demographic overload? How will Social Security and Medicare function with fewer working taxpayers to support these programs? According to Laurence Kotlikoff and Scott Burns, if our government continues on the course it has set, we'll see skyrocketing tax rates, drastically lower retirement and health benefits, high inflation, a rapidly depreciating dollar, unemployment, and political instability. The government has lost its compass, say Kotlikoff and Burns, and the current administration is heading straight into the coming generational storm. But don't panic. To solve a problem you must first understand it. Kotlikoff and Burns take us on a guided tour of our generational imbalance, first introducing us to the baby boomers— their long retirement years and "the protracted delay in their departure to the next world." Then there's the "fiscal child abuse" that will double the taxes paid by the next generation. There's also the "deficit delusion" of the under-reported national debt. And none of this, they say, will be solved by any of the popularly touted remedies: cutting taxes, technological progress, immigration, foreign investment, or the elimination of wasteful government spending. So how can the United States avoid this demographic/fiscal collision? Kotlikoff and Burns propose bold new policies, including meaningful reforms of Social Security, and Medicare. Their proposals are simple, straightforward, and geared to attract support from both political parties. But just in case politicians won't take the political risk to chart a new direction, Kotlikoff and Burns also offer a "life jacket"— guidelines for individuals to protect their financial health and retirement.… (lisätietoja)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 6) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
A worthy read, although I skimmed quite a bit until the authors got to providing solutions. What's particularly interesting about reading this in 2011 is that the book is now 7 years past its initial writing and allows for some perspective to be had. The big thrust of the book is all the unspoken -at the time- debt that rests in our country because of entitlements like social security and medicare/cade. Now, in 2011, it's a better realized fact. One need only look to Europe to see where decades of providing all things to it's citizens has lead. Debt is a very real issue which has been kicked down the road forever and is coming due. The authors did a fine job of explaining how politicians obscure the facts all the time and how no amount of new accounting or labeling will work for too much longer. I believe I agree with many of their solutions...even if they'll hurt to implement. One area they touch on but don't hit enough is how broken our government is because of two major items: lobbying and elections. We all know the effects of lobbying. Those who have deep pockets get heard, which is a BIG advantage. The second is known too but less criticized. Too many politicians spend time on the fence in order to be reelected; and this makes few of them able to make a hard decision. If it were up to me, the position of President would be a 6-7 year single term and then done. That person can focus on decisions without worry of needing to be reelected in 4 years. Another thing that's not mentioned is how we, individual citizens who are pouring money into investments, are also to blame for weak policies and governance. We want profits, period. This means when funds go down we pull our money or demand things turn around quickly. This leads those with the job of providing results to do reckless, short-term, things. I digress.

A book worthy of getting through and using for a basis for discussions. ( )
  RalphLagana | Jan 23, 2016 |
Recommended reading for anyone who cares even slightly about America's economic situation, and required reading for everyone in Generation X, who stand to loose the most from the generational war we are already in. One very quick lesson: fixing this problem will become a very slight bit easier once everyone on the right and the left divests themselves of the delusion that the crisis has a solution that doesn't involve raising taxes. Get over it. The historically low tax rate was fun while it lasted. You'll never see it again.

A point also made in the book: even if you increased the tax rate to 100% (which would never happen), it still doesn't come close to solving the problem. (Also, keep in mind the book was written in 2005, when Bush was president and we only owed the future $60 trillion.) ( )
  crop | Apr 21, 2011 |
It's now available as an ebook on the MIT press portal http://mitpress-ebooks.mit.edu/product/coming-generational-storm
  ipublishcentral | Aug 10, 2009 |
E-books II
  davidweigel | Nov 1, 2008 |
A good look at how we are bankrupting our future and stealing from the next generation. Suggestions for what we (as a country and as individuals) need to weather "The Coming Generational Storm" ( )
  PortiaLong | Jun 3, 2008 |
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One of Library Journal's Best Business Books of 2004, Winner in the category of Economics in the 2004 Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. and CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title for 2004 In 2030, as 77 million baby boomers hobble into old age, walkers will outnumber strollers; there will be twice as many retirees as there are today but only 18 percent more workers. How will America handle this demographic overload? How will Social Security and Medicare function with fewer working taxpayers to support these programs? According to Laurence Kotlikoff and Scott Burns, if our government continues on the course it has set, we'll see skyrocketing tax rates, drastically lower retirement and health benefits, high inflation, a rapidly depreciating dollar, unemployment, and political instability. The government has lost its compass, say Kotlikoff and Burns, and the current administration is heading straight into the coming generational storm. But don't panic. To solve a problem you must first understand it. Kotlikoff and Burns take us on a guided tour of our generational imbalance, first introducing us to the baby boomers— their long retirement years and "the protracted delay in their departure to the next world." Then there's the "fiscal child abuse" that will double the taxes paid by the next generation. There's also the "deficit delusion" of the under-reported national debt. And none of this, they say, will be solved by any of the popularly touted remedies: cutting taxes, technological progress, immigration, foreign investment, or the elimination of wasteful government spending. So how can the United States avoid this demographic/fiscal collision? Kotlikoff and Burns propose bold new policies, including meaningful reforms of Social Security, and Medicare. Their proposals are simple, straightforward, and geared to attract support from both political parties. But just in case politicians won't take the political risk to chart a new direction, Kotlikoff and Burns also offer a "life jacket"— guidelines for individuals to protect their financial health and retirement.

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