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Wild Nights!: Stories About the Last Days of…
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Wild Nights!: Stories About the Last Days of Poe, Dickinson, Twain, James,… (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1985; vuoden 2008 painos)

– tekijä: Joyce Carol Oates

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
3741852,466 (3.67)43
Reimagines the final days of five major American writers, in a collection of short works written in the subtly nuanced language style of each.
Jäsen:YogiABB
Teoksen nimi:Wild Nights!: Stories About the Last Days of Poe, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Hemingway
Kirjailijat:Joyce Carol Oates
Info:Ecco (2008), Hardcover, 256 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):**
Avainsanoja:short storys

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Wild Nights!: Stories About the Last Days of Poe, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Hemingway (tekijä: Joyce Carol Oates) (1985)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 18) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Really enjoyed the dark stories in this one, in particular the ones on James and Hemingway. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
Great writers do not necessarily lead great lives, and the end of their lives can be as miserable as anybody's. "Wild Nights!," the 2008 book of short stories by Joyce Carol Oates, examines the last days of five of the greatest American writers. Although she writes fiction, Oates did her homework and bases her tales on biographical information about the writers.

The one possible exception may be "EDickinsonRepliLuxe," a wonderful bit of science fiction in which Oates imagines a future time when anyone with enough money can purchase small robots with the appearance and personalities of famous people from the past. Mr. and Mrs. Krim choose to have a little Emily Dickinson in their home. Is there any other writer whose personality would be less suited to being, in effect, someone's household pet than the reclusive poet? Little Emily, her pockets stuffed with little pieces of paper covered with lines of poetry, tries to keep to herself until Mr. Krim, his wife away, decides to finally get his money's worth. The title of this collection, by the way, comes from a Dickinson poem.

The least successful story, "Poe Posthumous; or, The Light-House," takes the form of journal entries written by Poe while living in a lighthouse near the end of his brief life. Oates captures the increasing madness and declining health of the writer, but I didn't find the story very interesting. The three others prove to be gems, however.

"Grandpa Clemens & Angelfish, 1906" focuses on Mark Twain's late-in-life fascination with pretty girls between the ages of 10 and 16. He called them his Angelfish. In the story, Maddie is the favorite of his Angelfish, with whom he maintains a secret correspondence and conspires to meet in their secret place until he discovers, to his horror, that she has passed her 16th birthday. Then he shuts her off completely, even after the girl's mother, discovering his letters, begs him to write again because Maddie, in her despair, refuses to eat.

"Papa at Ketchum, 1961" takes us inside Ernest Hemingway's mind as he contemplates suicide. Always vain and selfish, he worries that even with a shotgun he will not do as good a job at it as his father managed with a handgun.

The writer who looks the best at the end of his life, at least in these stories, is Henry James in "The Master at St. Bartholomew's." The pompous and privileged writer, who loves being called the Master, chooses to become a servant to English boys wounded in the trenches during the Great War. He volunteers to help at a hospital in London where many of these soldiers are brought. At first he only talks with them or reads to them, but as the burden of so many wounded becomes too much for the strained hospital staff, he takes on less agreeable tasks, including emptying bedpans. Never in his life has he performed such labor. Now he does so willingly and with pride, wishing there was more he could do for these boys.

Oates has given us some fine stories about some fine writers. They may be fiction, but you will feel like you know the writers better after reading them. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Jan 16, 2015 |
Joyce Carol Oates has reimagined the final days of five important American authors: Poe, Dickinson, Twain, Henry James and Hemingway. The stories of Twain, James and Hemingway are the ones that stick closer to the historical record, while those of Poe and Dickinson take flight into the fantastic.

"Poe, Posthomous" imagines that Poe spent his final days not in Baltimore but in an isolated lighthouse off the coast of Chile, hoping that the solitude would allow him to produce an important philosophical treatise. As with most of the stories, Oates mimics the writing style of the author in question, and the story is very reminiscent of those Poe tales where the protagonist succumbs to madness, yet there are several elements, including the setting and the final development, that suggest Oates is channeling not Poe but Lovecraft. "EDickinsonRepiluxe" tells not so much about Emily Dickinson's last days, as of her 21st century resurrection as a sort of robotic family member/pet, purchased by a childless middle-aged couple to fill a void in their lives. Intriguing, but aside from its Twilight Zone-like premise, it felt like a familiar story of middle-age disappointment and estrangement.

The Twain, James and Hemingway are closer to what you'd expect given these authors final days. Twain is a broken man after the death of his wife and beloved daughter, resentful of the public persona he has to play. He seeks solace in the company of girls, younger than 16, mostly innocent but with somewhat creepy undertones. James volunteers in a veteran's hospital during WWI, where the suffering of young men affects him deeply. Hemingway struggles with his poor mental and physical health as he obsesses over bringing his life to an end. There's an interesting dichotomy between the first two stories, with their fantastic concepts, and the final three, which feel so much more grounded that it's hard to know when the truth ends and Oates' extrapolations begin. ( )
  CarlosMcRey | May 22, 2013 |
I loved the Emily Dickinson story. Absolutely! JCO at her best. I could take or leave the other stories, though it was interesting to see the evolution of the Poe story - from McSweeney's to the book. ( )
  usefuljack | May 17, 2013 |
I loved the Emily Dickinson story. Absolutely! JCO at her best. I could take or leave the other stories, though it was interesting to see the evolution of the Poe story - from McSweeney's to the book. ( )
  usefuljack | May 17, 2013 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 18) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Joyce Carol Oatesensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetcalculated
Deakins, MarkKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
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Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
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Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Wild Nights--Wild Nights!

Were I with thee

Wild Nights should be

Our luxury!

Futile--the Winds--

To a Heart in port--

Done with the Compass--

Done with the Chart!

Rowing in Eden--

Ah, the Sea!

Might I but moor--Tonight--

In Thee!

Emily Dickinson (1861)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
For Joyce and Seward Johnson
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Canonical DDC/MDS

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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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Reimagines the final days of five major American writers, in a collection of short works written in the subtly nuanced language style of each.

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