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The Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects (1988)

– tekijä: Barbara G. Walker

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
508335,972 (3.67)1
This fascinating guide to the history and mythology of woman-related symbols features: Unique organization by shape of symbol or type of sacred object 21 different sections including Round and Oval Motifs, Sacred Objects, Secular-Sacred Objects, Rituals, Deities' Signs, Supernaturals, Body Parts, Nature, Birds, Plants, Minerals, Stones and Shells, and more Introductory essays for each section 753 entries and 636 illustrations Alphabetical index for easy reference Three-Rayed Sun The sun suspended in heaven by three powers, perhaps the Triple Goddess who gave birth to it (see Three-Way Motifs). Corn Dolly An embodiment of the harvest to be set in the center of the harvest dance, or fed to the cattle to `make them thrive year round' (see Secular-Sacred Objects). Tongue In Asia, the extended tongue was a sign of life-force as the tongue between the lips imitated the sacred lingam-yoni: male within female genital. Sticking out the tongue is still a polite sign of greeting in northern India and Tibet (see Body Parts). Cosmic Egg In ancient times the primeval universe-or the Great Mother-took the form of an egg. It carried all numbers and letters within an ellipse, to show that everything is contained within one form at the beginning (see Round and Oval Motifs).… (lisätietoja)
Viimeisimmät tallentajatMSTG, raany, barbaramoot, BUUFlibrary, Kgarts, coopbooks
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näyttää 3/3
I bought Walker's Women's Rituals hoping to find a way to incorporate a form of spirituality without abandoning the rational. I found appealing her contention that spiritual can celebrate the real and natural. In the end, I didn't find doing such things as sewing a priestess robe or creating an altar was for me--but before that I found myself buying this book too--and I still keep it on my bookshelf. I suppose because I do find the material intriguing and entertaining. It's exhaustive and thorough and well-illustrated, and each entry cites a source listed in the Bibliography. Contents are divided into 21 sections including such objects as motifs, signs, supernaturals, zodiac, animals, minerals, etc. Here's a short entry selected at random:

Hermetic Cross [with picture of what looks like an anchor--a cross bisecting a semi-circle]
This version of the Christian cross was adapted from the sign of Hermes. Some said it was a "hermaphroditic" sign of male and female principles together: the male god (cross) arising from the female (crescent moon). Since the moon was a common symbol for all forms of the Virgin Mother including even her Christianized, mortalized one, the Hermetic cross was often interpreted as an emblem of Christ born of the virgin. 1

1. Koch, 12
--------------------------------

This is the definition of the same term at http://symboldictionary.net

This alchemical symbol, most often referred to as the Cross of Hermes, appears mainly in watermarks used by printers during the English Renaissance, were usually attributed patronage of their craft to the god Hermes. The emblem’s lower portion represents the hermetic maxim, “as above, so below,” and is related to the Masonic square and compass. The upper numeral “4″ is the sacred number of Hermes and represents the four directions and the the crossroads sacred to the god. This is the “sign of the cross” used by kabbalists; this self-blessing was later adopted by the Church of Rome.
----------------------------

Somewhat different--and notably that definition lacks a female dimension. Regardless, the book is fun to browse. ( )
2 ääni LisaMaria_C | Sep 13, 2013 |
Book Description: Edison, NJ: Castle Books, 1988. Hard Cover. Very Fine/Very Fine. 8vo - over 7" - 9¾" tall. Inside pages are clean, unmarked and tight.
Believe to be first edition, nothing to indicate otherwise.
  Czrbr | Jun 7, 2010 |
good reference book -- includes things not normally in dictionaries related to feminist symbols ( )
  beau.p.laurence | Jul 23, 2006 |
näyttää 3/3
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (5)

This fascinating guide to the history and mythology of woman-related symbols features: Unique organization by shape of symbol or type of sacred object 21 different sections including Round and Oval Motifs, Sacred Objects, Secular-Sacred Objects, Rituals, Deities' Signs, Supernaturals, Body Parts, Nature, Birds, Plants, Minerals, Stones and Shells, and more Introductory essays for each section 753 entries and 636 illustrations Alphabetical index for easy reference Three-Rayed Sun The sun suspended in heaven by three powers, perhaps the Triple Goddess who gave birth to it (see Three-Way Motifs). Corn Dolly An embodiment of the harvest to be set in the center of the harvest dance, or fed to the cattle to `make them thrive year round' (see Secular-Sacred Objects). Tongue In Asia, the extended tongue was a sign of life-force as the tongue between the lips imitated the sacred lingam-yoni: male within female genital. Sticking out the tongue is still a polite sign of greeting in northern India and Tibet (see Body Parts). Cosmic Egg In ancient times the primeval universe-or the Great Mother-took the form of an egg. It carried all numbers and letters within an ellipse, to show that everything is contained within one form at the beginning (see Round and Oval Motifs).

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