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The Road Through the Wall (Penguin Classics)…
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The Road Through the Wall (Penguin Classics) (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1948; vuoden 2013 painos)

– tekijä: Shirley Jackson (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
264974,798 (3.71)31
Reminiscent of her classic story 'The Lottery', Jackson's disturbing and darkly funny first novel exposes the underside of American suburban life. 'Her books penetrate keenly to the terrible truths which sometimes hide behind comfortable fictions, to the treachery beneath cheery neighborhood faces and the plain manners of country folk; to the threat that sparkles at the rainbow's edge of the sprinkler spray on even the greenest lawns, on the sunniest of midsummer mornings' Donna Tartt In Pepper Street, an attractive suburban neighbourhood filled with bullies and egotistical bigots, the feelings of the inhabitants are shallow and selfish: what can a neighbour gain from another neighbour, what may be won from a friend? One child stands alone in her goodness: little Caroline Desmond, kind, sweet and gentle, and the pride of her family. But the malice and self-absorption of the people of Pepper Street lead to a terrible event that will destroy the community of which they are so proud. Exposing the murderous cruelty of children, and the blindness and selfishness of adults, Shirley Jackson reveals the ugly truth behind a 'perfect' world. Shirley Jackson's chilling tales have the power to unsettle and terrify unlike any other. She was born in California in 1916. When her short story The Lottery was first published in The New Yorker in 1948, readers were so horrified they sent her hate mail; it has since become one of the greatest American stories of all time. Her first novel, The Road Through the Wall, was published in the same year and was followed by five more: Hangsaman, The Bird's Nest, The Sundial, The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle, widely seen as her masterpiece. Shirley Jackson died in her sleep at the age of 48. 'An amazing writer' Neil Gaiman 'Shirley Jackson is one of those highly idiosyncratic, inimitable writers ... whose work exerts an enduring spell' Joyce Carol Oates 'An unburnished exercise in the sinister' The New York Times… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:OHBibliophile
Teoksen nimi:The Road Through the Wall (Penguin Classics)
Kirjailijat:Shirley Jackson (Tekijä)
Info:Penguin Classics (2013), 208 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto, Aion lukea
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:Fiction

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The Road Through the Wall (tekijä: Shirley Jackson) (1948)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 9) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Shirley Jackson brings her uncanny wit and astute observations to SUBURBIA!

A huge ensemble cast makes this a difficult one to connect with, but it's oh so clever and filled to the brim with absurd reality.

This isn't the best Jackson for readers looking for a strong story or character arcs, but as good as any looking for top-notch irony and a deeper understanding of people. ( )
  chrisblocker | Nov 29, 2020 |
Jackson's first novel, finally put back into print (in high style) by Penguin classics.

Reading a well-known author's early work is a strange experience. Of course, she had already written "The Lottery", but in the novel form her style was still developing. In the residents of Pepper Street, Jackson has sketched out wicked portraits of suburban middle-class hypocrisy. The community is dissected from the top down, from the country-club aspiring snobs and attendant social climbers to a young girl trying to take care of her disabled sister alone without raising the suspicions of prying, "neighborly" neighbors. Two characters, elderly women living by themselves, are interesting of themselves, but also considering how much Jackson wrote later about the woman alone and her particular place (or lack thereof) in society.

What most readers will notice is the near-absence of the supernatural and horror elements, though there are tinges here and there throughout. However, nearly everyone is mental.

It's mostly through the children that Jackson depicts daily life. She crafts each of them as an individual, but none are immune from the mob mentality or the cruelties their parents consciously and unconsciously pass onto them. In today's world of heightened "bully" awareness it shouldn't shock us what callous monsters children are, but through Jackson's eyes it's heartbreaking. What plot there is concerns the eventual removal of a wall at the end of their neighborhood and the fear of the social miscegenation that will erupt because of its absence. But the novel is well worth the read simply for the way that Jackson can write about people and their relations with each other. Jackson could Observe. ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
This isn't a novel about a character. It's a novel about a whole neighborhood, and that's quite a number of characters, and that's quite a bit difficult keeping them all straight. I'm going to have to reread this because it's interesting and I think I'll get more out of it on a second read, but on a first read I give it 3*** because of the confusing number of characters. ( )
  CurrerBell | Mar 26, 2017 |
This was Shirley Jackson's first book, and it doesn't hold up to the standards she set in her later novels and short stories. But it is an interesting work for a reader who has read other books by her, as it's possible to catch a glimpse of the themes she would explore so brilliantly later.

The story takes place on Pepper Street, a suburban California community of people for whom a house there is the best they can achieve, at least for the time being. School is out for the summer, and the children of various ages play, trouble and torment each other, and clash or make peace with their families. Jackson introduces the reader to each of the families, and none of them, with the possible exception of the shunned Jewish family, is one anyone would want to be part of. There is the mother who opens her daughter's locked desk to read her private poems and other writings, and the mother who continues to refer to her 16-year-old son as her adopted son, and the girl who loves to needle the others, and the younger boy who is avoided by everyone because he is a little strange (or is he a little strange because everyone avoids him?), and many more. Every now and then some of the braver teenagers venture a few blocks away to some of the stores that serve the broader community and even meet people who don't live on Pepper Street.

What this book really portrays is the claustrophobia of conformity and an obsession with class. None of the adults wants to rock the boat; they all want to behave in the "right" way. But some changes inevitably occur, and there are outsiders. Along with the Jewish family, who are basically ignored, there is a rental house, and about two-thirds of the way through the book a very strange family with an almost nonexistent mother and two girls, the older of whom manages the family and takes care of the younger one who is apparently mentally challenged in some undefined way; the family also seems to have an inexplicable source of cash. The younger girl behaves completely freely, which is very transgressive for Pepper Street. Towards the very end of the book, a completely horrifying and shocking event takes place.

The wall is at the end of the street, and towards the end it is being knocked down so the undeveloped land beyond it can be built on. Needless to say, this disturbs the residents of Pepper Street (who might move in?), but I have been thinking about it and the title, since the breaking down of the wall only takes place when the book is almost over. So, obviously, the wall is metaphoric and creative people need to break through it.

Jackson is an excellent writer, so these points aren't as obvious as I've made them sound, but the book is almost as claustrophobic as the the street and this was an interesting but not really an enjoyable read.
7 ääni rebeccanyc | Jan 31, 2016 |
I was NOT expecting that ending! I'm glad I went into this one with low expectations, because it really impressed me - it was both quintessential Shirley Jackson (ambiguous ending, slowly-building tension, the warping of commonplace occurrences and character types into something sinister) and not at all (the setting: sunny suburbia, nothing supernatural in sight). I kept comparing it to a Sinclair Lewis novel; she's pulling back the curtains on an overly-idealized bit of Americana and revealing the (bigoted, judgmental, gossipy) rot within. The ending, though - 100% classic Shirley Jackson. The last 20 pages were a gut punch. ( )
  KLmesoftly | Nov 10, 2014 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 9) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Jackson, Shirleyensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Franklin, RuthEsipuhemuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
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Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
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Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
The weather falls more gently on some places than on others, the world looks down more paternally on some people.
Sitaatit
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Erotteluhuomautus
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

Reminiscent of her classic story 'The Lottery', Jackson's disturbing and darkly funny first novel exposes the underside of American suburban life. 'Her books penetrate keenly to the terrible truths which sometimes hide behind comfortable fictions, to the treachery beneath cheery neighborhood faces and the plain manners of country folk; to the threat that sparkles at the rainbow's edge of the sprinkler spray on even the greenest lawns, on the sunniest of midsummer mornings' Donna Tartt In Pepper Street, an attractive suburban neighbourhood filled with bullies and egotistical bigots, the feelings of the inhabitants are shallow and selfish: what can a neighbour gain from another neighbour, what may be won from a friend? One child stands alone in her goodness: little Caroline Desmond, kind, sweet and gentle, and the pride of her family. But the malice and self-absorption of the people of Pepper Street lead to a terrible event that will destroy the community of which they are so proud. Exposing the murderous cruelty of children, and the blindness and selfishness of adults, Shirley Jackson reveals the ugly truth behind a 'perfect' world. Shirley Jackson's chilling tales have the power to unsettle and terrify unlike any other. She was born in California in 1916. When her short story The Lottery was first published in The New Yorker in 1948, readers were so horrified they sent her hate mail; it has since become one of the greatest American stories of all time. Her first novel, The Road Through the Wall, was published in the same year and was followed by five more: Hangsaman, The Bird's Nest, The Sundial, The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle, widely seen as her masterpiece. Shirley Jackson died in her sleep at the age of 48. 'An amazing writer' Neil Gaiman 'Shirley Jackson is one of those highly idiosyncratic, inimitable writers ... whose work exerts an enduring spell' Joyce Carol Oates 'An unburnished exercise in the sinister' The New York Times

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