KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

Maailman kauhea vihreys (2019)

Tekijä: Benjamín Labatut

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,0704919,139 (3.95)58
"A fictional examination of the lives of real-life scientists and thinkers whose discoveries resulted in moral consequences beyond their imagining. When We Cease to Understand the World is a book about the complicated links between scientific and mathematical discovery, madness, and destruction. Fritz Haber, Alexander Grothendieck, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrodinger: these are some of luminaries into whose troubled lives Labatut's book thrusts the reader, showing us how they grappled with the most profound questions of existence. They have strokes of unparalleled genius, alienate friends and lovers, descend into isolation and insanity. Some of their discoveries reshape human life to the better; others pave the way to chaos and unimaginable suffering. The lines are never clear. At a breakneck pace and with a wealth of disturbing detail, Benjamin Labatut uses the imaginative resources of fiction to tell the stories of scientists and mathematicians who expanded our notions of the possible"--… (lisätietoja)
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin nähdäksesi, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 58 mainintaa

englanti (47)  tanska (1)  hollanti (1)  Kaikki kielet (49)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 49) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Series Info/Source: This is a stand alone book. I borrowed this on audiobook from my library.

Thoughts: This was fine. I didn't realize that this book is fictional accounts of historical scientific figures (I thought it was non-fiction). This seems to be a bit sensationalized to me. I did enjoy learning the history of these scientists but am left trying to sort out what was history and what was embellishment.

There is a heavy theme of mathematicians either developing theories while in fevers or going insane. The telling wandered quite a bit as well, part of this may have been because I was listening to this on audiobook rather than reading it. I would definitely recommend reading this rather than listening to it because it is hard to follow.

There was also quite the obsession with super gory details as well as odd sexual details; not sure if these were fact, fiction, or just meant to give the story more "color". All of these details seemed over the top and I felt they were over-emphasized.

A lot of the story seems to focus on how these scientific leaps lead to destruction, although in a few cases they lead to good outcomes as well. It would have been incredibly helpful to have either a foreword or afterword discussing what was fact and fiction in this book.

I listened to this on audiobook and the narration was fine. I found that the context of the stories and how they were woven together were a bit hard to follow and I think I could have followed this easier reading it rather than listening to it. You really have to pay attention and concentrate and I listen to audiobooks mainly while doing other tasks (driving, laundry, yardwork, etc).

My Summary (3/5): Overall this was okay but I honestly would have been okay not reading this as well. The fact that it is a factual sounding account of these scientists' lives but is actually fictional leaves me frustrated, especially since there are no references or account of what is fact and what is fiction. There are a ton of gory and sexual details added which seemed to outshine the scientific discoveries. At the end this felt like more of a sensationalized treatise on how insane all these clever people were than anything else. If I had known a bit more about what this book was about prior to reading it I probably wouldn't have read it. It was somewhat interesting to learn about these scientists, but I am not sure what I actually learned since this is a fictional account. ( )
  krau0098 | May 16, 2024 |
This is a collection of short stories about some scientists. They are well written and show interesting and little known aspects. The stories are independent, and looks like extracted from a periodic publication or magazine.
Haber, Schwartzchild, Grothendieck, Heisemberg, Schrödinger. ( )
  amlobo | May 3, 2024 |
This book is really going to bork my knowledge of the science history of Haber, Schwarzchild, Grothendieck, Heisenberg, and Schrödinger, but that’s ok. A dark fiction of nonfictions, it is a book of imagined tails of these giants on the edge of discovery and disaster.

Some will be offended by the male genius trope, but others might consider that these are not heroes, and that science on the edge is, by definition, madness. Most scientists never get to live on this boundary, spending their lives in the cold comfort of existing structures, and Labatut captures this terrifying boundary in dense dark prose. ( )
  dabacon | Mar 14, 2024 |
This book both is and is not like Helena Bonham Carter. Like HBC, it is kind of strange and darkly seductive and wonderfully entertaining. Unlike HBC, I’m not sure it entirely stands up to a great deal of scrutiny. As a reading (listening, actually) experience several months ago it was an easy 5 stars. Pondering after a later re-read with it as printed matter, I have a few qualms.

The identity of the book is first of all in Labatut’s idea that trying to grasp the hidden core of reality, what in his view we can’t in fact ever understand, tends to lead to suffering and madness, as demonstrated by the lives of a number of the most genius of scientists, and secondly in using fictional elements in an effort to illustrate this idea in a gradually increasing way through the book, starting from a 99.9% factual first section. This second element I think is largely responsible for winning the book its renown. However, despite being shortlisted for the 2021 International Booker, I would not classify this book as fiction; basically it’s another [b:The War of the Poor|54765614|The War of the Poor|Éric Vuillard|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1596192583l/54765614._SY75_.jpg|67580285] situation and again, for me: not fiction. Rather, it’s using a bit of fiction to try to strengthen its point-of-view in recounting and interpreting actual events - like, you know, history books.

The book does some things quite well, such as pulling the reader along a swiftly moving stream of interesting facts and ideas from science and, particularly, quantum physics. That said, it does so at a superficial level, a good bit away from something like a more standard non-fiction work on quantum physics for the general reader. But that’s fair enough really, because that is not its concern - and perhaps a relief to many a reader. The book doesn’t need the reader to have the foggiest notion of how Heisenberg’s matrices actually work, just know they’re something he created while trying to comprehend the deepest nature of reality. And while going a bit mad.

Characterization is another thing the book generally does very well, quickly giving a sense of the different scientists in its focus. But then here’s where the fictional elements come into play. Labatut makes up scenes to emphasize his view that their scientific efforts were leading them into suffering and madness. How well do these scenes work? Does reading that Heisenberg went on walks during which:
He would shit squatting down as if he were a dog marking its territory, and then root around for stones to cover his filth, imagining that at any moment someone might surprise him with his trousers around his ankles.


add to its persuasive picture?

If Labatut’s thesis is persuasive, why include these made up scenes? If for literary reasons, I don’t think they work that well on further reflection, or at least they aren’t for me. If they’re necessary for convincing readers of his thesis, then maybe his thesis isn’t actually all that persuasive.

In a review of the book, Maria Dahvana Headley writes that, “The men profiled in this volume are certainly geniuses, but they’ve been curated to reflect catastrophe.” That they have. And it’s a darkly seductive curation, to Labatut’s credit. But is it a fair view of the history of humankind in reaching for new and deep understandings? Well.

The book certainly does much to praise. The prose, translated from the Spanish, is terrific. As for my complaint that inserting some imagined scenes does not in itself make a work fiction, perhaps a misleadingly curated book of non-fiction could be said to get there in the end. ( )
  lelandleslie | Feb 24, 2024 |
Obsessions with science and mathematics leads to discoveries - and at times madness. I would have preferred if this book weren't such a blend of fact - and some fiction. Would it really have been less of a great read if it were all non-fiction? ( )
  vunderbar | Feb 18, 2024 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 49) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (4 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Labatut, Benjamínensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
West, Adrian NathanKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu

Kuuluu näihin kustantajien sarjoihin

Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Teoksen kanoninen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot italiankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
We rise, we fall. We may rise by falling. Defeat shapes us. Our only wisdom is tragic, known too late, and only to the lost.
Guy Davenport
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
In a medical examination on the eve of the Nuremburg Trials, the doctors found the nails of Hermann Göring's fingers and toes stained a furious red, the consequence of his addiction to dihydrocodeine, an analgesic of which he took more than one hundred pills a day.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
If everything that occurred was the direct consequence of a prior state, then merely by looking at the present and running the equations it would be possible to achieve a godlike knowledge of the universe. These hopes were shattered in light of Heisenberg's discovery: what was beyond our grasp was neither the future nor the past, but the present itself.
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

"A fictional examination of the lives of real-life scientists and thinkers whose discoveries resulted in moral consequences beyond their imagining. When We Cease to Understand the World is a book about the complicated links between scientific and mathematical discovery, madness, and destruction. Fritz Haber, Alexander Grothendieck, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrodinger: these are some of luminaries into whose troubled lives Labatut's book thrusts the reader, showing us how they grappled with the most profound questions of existence. They have strokes of unparalleled genius, alienate friends and lovers, descend into isolation and insanity. Some of their discoveries reshape human life to the better; others pave the way to chaos and unimaginable suffering. The lines are never clear. At a breakneck pace and with a wealth of disturbing detail, Benjamin Labatut uses the imaginative resources of fiction to tell the stories of scientists and mathematicians who expanded our notions of the possible"--

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Current Discussions

-

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.95)
0.5
1 7
1.5
2 8
2.5 4
3 32
3.5 24
4 94
4.5 21
5 64

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 205,928,838 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä