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The Removed: A Novel – tekijä: Brandon…
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The Removed: A Novel (vuoden 2021 painos)

– tekijä: Brandon Hobson (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
14512145,881 (3.56)2
Jäsen:hana321
Teoksen nimi:The Removed: A Novel
Kirjailijat:Brandon Hobson (Tekijä)
Info:Ecco (2021), 288 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):***
Avainsanoja:Netgalley

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The Removed (tekijä: Brandon Hobson)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 12) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I have a lot of mixed feelings about this story. On the one hand I enjoy stories of myth or legend, and on the other I found myself a little bit confused as to what is going on. The story begins with a bang literally, when the middle child from the Echota family is killed in an encounter with police when he is just 15. Fast forward 15 years and the remaining kids have grown up, and the mother is now retired and the dad is starting to deteriorate from Alzheimer’s. Each person in the family seems to have been affected a little differently by the tragedy, and with the anniversary approaching each family member seems to go through a new set of strange experiences. Since the family are members of the Cherokee Nation they are perhaps influenced a little differently just based on their heritage and the long history of the tribe, and all they may have gone through just to survive. This story bounces around a lot without much in the way of transitions, and as the reader I kinda gathered that what is going on with the characters is somewhat open to interpretation. I didn’t love this, and I didn’t hate it. I feel like it wouldn’t appeal to everyone. I feel like in general that Native American cultures are not the subject in enough literature, so I am glad to see stories like this being written, I just wish I could track the meanings in this novel better. Thank you to Netgalley for the copy in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  hana321 | Apr 18, 2021 |
Brandon Hobson's The Removed is one of those books that is so original and so compelling, that I felt it feeling inarticulate. All I could say was "Wow. Just wow."

Of course, "Wow. Just wow." does not make for a satisfactory review, so let me try to pin down some of the things that make The Removed so remarkable. First off, there are the characters, members of a Cherokee family whose ancestors moved to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears, are a varied group: retired, social-worker mother; father gradually disappearing due to Alzheimer's; adult daughter who finds herself attracted to younger men; adult son, an addict who wants to make his family happy by quitting, but hasn't been able to do so. There are two more important characters: Ray-Ray a second son who has been dead for more than a decade, killed by a cop, and Wyatt, a short term foster placement with the family, preternaturally gifted and uncannily similar in way to Ray-Ray. The novel is thick with magical realism that truly is magic—in both the positive and negative sense of the word.

It's only March, but I am 100% confident that The Removed will be on my "Best of 2021" list. Give yourself the pleasure of reading this surprising and powerful novel soon.

I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher; the opinions are my own. ( )
  Sarah-Hope | Mar 17, 2021 |
The Echota family, of Cherokee heritage, is trying to navigate modern American life while dealing with the continued prejudices and stereotypes existing in society. Maria and Ernest Echota had three children. One of their children, Ray-Ray, was shot and killed by a police officer in Quah, Oklahoma. The officer heard a gunshot and instinctively decided that it must have been the Indian who shot it. The police officer was cleared of wrongdoing, and the Echota family was left to deal with their grief. The shooting took place on September 6, which is the Cherokee National Holiday. It marks the anniversary of the 1839 signing of the Constitution of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma. Starting on the tenth anniversary, the family marked Ray-Ray’s death and the Cherokee National Holiday with a family bonfire. Most of the story's action leads to the fifteenth anniversary when it is not clear whether Edgar, the younger son, will choose to attend the annual family bonfire. He has been struggling with drug addiction, and although the family had sponsored an intervention, he was in contact less frequently as the anniversary approached.

Brandon Hobson includes different characters’ points of view: Maria, Edgar, and Sonja (the oldest child of Maria and Ernest). We also hear the voice of Tsala, who is sharing traditional Cherokee stories and wisdom. Still, his stories' role relative to the family isn’t apparent until later in the story. Each character deals with Ray-Ray’s death differently, and each is profoundly bothered by it, especially because it represents such an injustice for the Cherokee people. Sonja seems obsessed with a much younger man named Vin, and when she finally meets him and spends time with him, she realizes that he has many undesirable traits. For one thing, he doesn’t realize how offensive his demand that Sonya “talk like an Indian” is. And he is physically abusive. Vin has a son named Luka, and Sonya sees Ray-Ray’s spirit in him.

Maria Echota is a retired social worker for the tribe, and she and Ernest decide to foster a young boy named Wyatt. Wyatt has many interests and personality traits that remind them of Ray-Ray. Although Edgar ends up getting involved with a friend who is looking to exploit him and his Cherokee heritage, he also has a vision that reminds him of Ray-Ray. So, the family members are coping by seeing that Ray-Ray’s spirit is alive in their world.

Hobson uses this compelling narrative to show how the human psyche reflects Cherokee beliefs. I am not an expert on Cherokee culture, but I know that there is a belief that there is a spiritual connection to many things. I think that the Cherokee see birds as symbols, messages, and omens. A fowl haunts Edgar. Since I read the Kindle version of the book, I searched and found that the fowl is mentioned 63 times. Edgar is the most troubled of the main characters and storytellers; the fowl continually reminds him that he is going astray, far from his family’s values. Included in the text is the idea that eagles are considered messengers in Cherokee mythology. There are numerous references to eagles and owls in the text, with the owl figuring into some of the book’s most touching passages. The owl seems to represent not only wisdom but also transitions, including the transition from life to death.

The book is beautifully written. Usually, when I know I have to write a review, I will take notes to remember what I want to say. I found myself so involved in the modern family drama that I didn’t stop to take many notes. Hobson includes themes and messages pertinent to all Americans, such as police violence, drug addiction, and mental illness. These themes and others could be any family’s story, not necessarily just a Cherokee family’s.

Additionally, the family connectedness, the mother’s concerns and worries about her children, and the siblings’ views about parental expectations are universal themes. However, interspersed in everyday life of sending text messages, ignoring them, and researching potential lovers on Google are interesting and disturbing reminders about how the American government sponsored the Removal of Indians. The Removed, a carefully chosen multi-layered title, emphasizes the Trail of Tears, which was part of a series of forced relocations of approximately 100,000 Native Americans between 1830 and 1850, also known as the Indian removal. The title also describes each character's condition: Maria's depression, Sonya's relationship choices, Ernest's Alzheimer's, and Edgar's drug addiction.

This author has achieved his goal of writing a general interest novel that includes essential messages about Native Americans. It is not didactic; it is engaging in the way of Louise Erdrich’s books. Its message also reminds me of Diaz’s In the Distance and Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon.
I received this book free from Netflix in exchange for an honest review.

https://quipsandquotes.net/?p=438 ( )
1 ääni LindaLoretz | Mar 15, 2021 |
The Echota family, of Cherokee heritage, is trying to navigate modern American life while dealing with the continued prejudices and stereotypes existing in society. Maria and Ernest Echota had three children. One of their children, Ray-Ray, was shot and killed by a police officer in Quah, Oklahoma. The officer heard a gunshot and instinctively decided that it must have been the Indian who shot it. The police officer was cleared of wrongdoing, and the Echota family was left to deal with their grief. The shooting took place on September 6, which is the Cherokee National Holiday. It marks the anniversary of the 1839 signing of the Constitution of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma. Starting on the tenth anniversary, the family marked Ray-Ray’s death and the Cherokee National Holiday with a family bonfire. Most of the story's action leads to the fifteenth anniversary when it is not clear whether Edgar, the younger son, will choose to attend the annual family bonfire. He has been struggling with drug addiction, and although the family had sponsored an intervention, he was in contact less frequently as the anniversary approached.

Brandon Hobson includes different characters’ points of view: Maria, Edgar, and Sonja (the oldest child of Maria and Ernest). We also hear the voice of Tsala, who is sharing traditional Cherokee stories and wisdom. Still, his stories' role relative to the family isn’t apparent until later in the story. Each character deals with Ray-Ray’s death differently, and each is profoundly bothered by it, especially because it represents such an injustice for the Cherokee people. Sonja seems obsessed with a much younger man named Vin, and when she finally meets him and spends time with him, she realizes that he has many undesirable traits. For one thing, he doesn’t realize how offensive his demand that Sonya “talk like an Indian” is. And he is physically abusive. Vin has a son named Luka, and Sonya sees Ray-Ray’s spirit in him.

Maria Echota is a retired social worker for the tribe, and she and Ernest decide to foster a young boy named Wyatt. Wyatt has many interests and personality traits that remind them of Ray-Ray. Although Edgar ends up getting involved with a friend who is looking to exploit him and his Cherokee heritage, he also has a vision that reminds him of Ray-Ray. So, the family members are coping by seeing that Ray-Ray’s spirit is alive in their world.

Hobson uses this compelling narrative to show how the human psyche reflects Cherokee beliefs. I am not an expert on Cherokee culture, but I know that there is a belief that there is a spiritual connection to many things. I think that the Cherokee see birds as symbols, messages, and omens. A fowl haunts Edgar. Since I read the Kindle version of the book, I searched and found that the fowl is mentioned 63 times. Edgar is the most troubled of the main characters and storytellers; the fowl continually reminds him that he is going astray, far from his family’s values. Included in the text is the idea that eagles are considered messengers in Cherokee mythology. There are numerous references to eagles and owls in the text, with the owl figuring into some of the book’s most touching passages. The owl seems to represent not only wisdom but also transitions, including the transition from life to death.

The book is beautifully written. Usually, when I know I have to write a review, I will take notes to remember what I want to say. I found myself so involved in the modern family drama that I didn’t stop to take many notes. Hobson includes themes and messages pertinent to all Americans, such as police violence, drug addiction, and mental illness. These themes and others could be any family’s story, not necessarily just a Cherokee family’s.

Additionally, the family connectedness, the mother’s concerns and worries about her children, and the siblings’ views about parental expectations are universal themes. However, interspersed in everyday life of sending text messages, ignoring them, and researching potential lovers on Google are interesting and disturbing reminders about how the American government sponsored the Removal of Indians. The Removed, a carefully chosen multi-layered title, emphasizes the Trail of Tears, which was part of a series of forced relocations of approximately 100,000 Native Americans between 1830 and 1850, also known as the Indian removal. The title also describes each character's condition: Maria's depression, Sonya's relationship choices, Ernest's Alzheimer's, and Edgar's drug addiction.

This author has achieved his goal of writing a general interest novel that includes essential messages about Native Americans. It is not didactic; it is engaging in the way of Louise Erdrich’s books. Its message also reminds me of Diaz’s In the Distance and Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon.
I received this book free from Netflix in exchange for an honest review.


https://quipsandquotes.net/?p=438 ( )
  LindaLoretz | Mar 15, 2021 |
I think you have to be high on peyote to truly enjoy this book with all its dreams and symbolism. Then it would be a real winner. ( )
  Citizenjoyce | Mar 2, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 12) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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