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The Evening and the Morning (Kingsbridge)…
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The Evening and the Morning (Kingsbridge) (vuoden 2020 painos)

– tekijä: Ken Follett (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
5462032,369 (4.15)4
"It is 997 CE, the end of the Dark Ages. England is facing attacks from the Welsh in the west and the Vikings in the east. Those in power bend justice according to their will, regardless of ordinary people and often in conflict with the king. Without a clear rule of law, chaos reigns. In these turbulent times, three characters find their lives intertwined: A young boatbuilder's life is turned upside down when the only home he's ever known is raided by Vikings, forcing him and his family to move and start their lives anew in a small hamlet where he does not fit in. . . . A Norman noblewoman marries for love, following her husband across the sea to a new land. But the customs of her husband's homeland are shockingly different, and as she begins to realize that everyone around her is engaged in a constant, brutal battle for power, it becomes clear that a single misstep could be catastrophic. . . . A monk dreams of transforming his humble abbey into a center of learning that will be admired throughout Europe. And each in turn comes into dangerous conflict with a clever and ruthless bishop who will do anything to increase his wealth and power. Thirty years ago, Ken Follett published his most popular novel, The Pillars of the Earth. Now, Follett's masterful new prequel The Evening and the Morning takes us on an epic journey into a historical past rich with ambition and rivalry, death and birth, love and hate, that will end where The Pillars of the Earth begins"--… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:StMarkOceanPark
Teoksen nimi:The Evening and the Morning (Kingsbridge)
Kirjailijat:Ken Follett (Tekijä)
Info:Viking (2020), 928 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:Fiction

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Tuli ilta ja tuli aamu (tekijä: Ken Follett)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatdebrow, PMedicalLibrary, Rick686ID, bellisc, Mikalina, yksityinen kirjasto, Momgoth

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» Katso myös 4 mainintaa

englanti (13)  espanja (2)  katalaani (1)  ranska (1)  italia (1)  Kaikki kielet (18)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 18) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
What a mess!
After I was positive surprised by "A Column of Fire" after "A Worlds End" was such a smut fest, "The Evening and the Morning" is again a major let down.
I can see that Follett had the background story in his head ever since he came up with Pillars and wanted to finally write it down. What he did in the end, was not focusing on the politics or the building of the city that would become Kingsbridge, but he put his whole effort in a story line that reads like a bad romance novel in places.
That he likes to have a happy ending for his heroes is one thing, but in this book it is just too much, both Ragna and Edgar are borderline Mary Sue (do they have any weakness?) and the villains are so comical that all they need is a top hat and a monocle to make it perfect. (Oh, and a handlebar mustache I guess.)
The jacket talks about that three lives are interwoven but we hardly hear anything of the third person. Everything which has to do with the growth of Dreng's Ferry to King's Bridge is basically ignored or only mentioned in passing.
The story is so thin, the only reason it ended up over 900 pages was the insane amount of smut and if there was no sex than there was violence, and in some cases both together.
I do not say no to smut normally, if it is good written, but in this case, it felt like as if he had text modules from his previous works which he just reused, but then, the whole story felt like a weak third brewing, repeating a lot of ideas from the other three installments.

Even though this book is like a car crash where you have to look on (I took breaks from reading at times, as it was just too silly), I have to give it to Mr Follett that his writing is entertaining, and which is the only reason I did finish the book and why I added an extra half star.
If this would have been the first book I read about Kingsbridge, it would have been most likely my last. ( )
  Black-Lilly | Jan 14, 2021 |
In The Evening and the Morning, Ken Follett shows that he’s still a master at giving the reader the same thing, but different.

The book is the fourth entry in his Kingsbridge series, which began with The Pillars of the Earth. I haven’t read the third installment, A Column of Fire, but I assume it follows the same pattern: in pre-industrial England, characters from different classes—clergy, nobles, and peasants—go about their daily lives in ways that bring them into union and conflict. In the process, we get regular injections of sex, violence, and history.

(My review of the second book, World Without End, included this summary: “in terms of archetypes, there’s a fair bit of overlap with the first book—the leads include a clever builder, a brutish fighter, and an enterprising woman who chafes against conventional wisdom. But over the course of [many years], we see the protagonists overcome fresh obstacles and setbacks … Decisions echo down through the years. Rivalries linger. Love blooms and withers and blooms again.” The description works just as well here.)

The Evening and the Morning has a twist, though: the story is a prequel, set in the Dark Ages, more than a hundred years before the events of The Pillars of the Earth.

I liked this approach because Follett is writing first and foremost about a place—and not a continuing set of characters. Or to put it another way, the central character of the Kingsbridge series is Kingsbridge, Follett’s fictional English town. In the (chronologically) later books, we see Kingsbridge develop and expand. But in The Evening in the Morning, we see how Kingsbridge becomes Kingsbridge.

Its beginnings are humble. The hamlet (not yet a town) has no bridge and a less illustrious name. The entrance to the church is crumbling; the entire structure is gradually sliding down a hill. The leadership is corrupt. The island in the river is full of lepers.

But by the end of the novel, Kingsbridge comes into its own, changing more than any of the people who shaped it. (The human characters in this series are rarely dynamic; for the most part, they’re either all good or all bad, with little complexity.) The transformation is fun to watch.

As usual, I enjoyed the historical details—although, as Follet notes in the afterword, “The Dark Age left few traces. Not much was written down, there were few pictures, and nearly all buildings were made of wood that rotted away a thousand years ago or more. This leaves room for guesswork and disagreement, more so than with the preceding period of the Roman Empire or the subsequent Middle Ages.”

Even so, The Evening in the Morning seems like it’s on solid ground when it illustrates how hard women had it. Most were exploited by men; many died in childbirth; few lived to old age. The book also explores an early version of slavery. According to Follett, the majority of slaves in England during this era were Britons, people pressed into bondage “from the wild western fringes of civilization, Wales and Cornwall and Ireland.” Others voluntarily gave up their freedom to escape starvation. Whatever their origin, young slaves were often prostituted, and the punishment for abusing them was mild. Another wrinkle is that the story runs through a time when the primary adversary of the English wasn’t the French, but the Vikings. Norse raids were frequent and devastating, and they took their share of captives.

None of this alters the overall plot much. The good guys still find happiness in the end; the bad guys still get their comeuppance. You wouldn’t be far off if you said The Evening in the Morning is essentially The Pillars of the Earth with a different cover. It’s a fair critique.

And my reply would be, “So what? I zipped through it anyway—all nine hundred pages.” Not every author consistently fosters that type of momentum. But Follett’s formula works, even when you recognize it.

(For more reviews like this one, see www.nickwisseman.com) ( )
  nickwisseman | Jan 4, 2021 |
a good introduction to what life might have been like = nitty and gritty - in the 10th Century ( )
  VictoriaJZ | Dec 18, 2020 |
This is a prequel of the authors Pillars of the Earth, which I read a number of years ago along with its sequel, World Without End. It has been so long ago, that I had to look up my review to see if I liked them; turns out that I did.

Which is a little surprising, since I really didn’t care much for this novel, especially the writing style, which I found to be quite simple; limited vocabulary, short sentences, bad dialogue. Likewise, the plot was extremely predictable and uninteresting. The characters are one-dimensional caricatures.

MINOR SPOILERS

Norman princess marries an English lord in the year 997, and becomes embroiled in a family power struggle. The princess is a strong feminist, facing the stepmother of her husband and her two sons, one a bishop, the other an evil dolt. Her husband has an ex-wife that he continued to sleep with and a Welsh slave girl that also enjoys his affections.

As you can imagine, the bishop is irredeemably wicked. The second major character is a young man with many talents, something of a medieval renaissance man. He befriends the princess and…you can imagine.

Much of the dialogue is atrocious. Many of the circumstances and events are unrealistic and verge on silly. I can’t imagine that the earlier works read similarly, or I would not have rated them so highly. I DO note that some of the author’s other work that I have read did not rate so highly and suffer from the same issues.

Now, this is a very large and heavy book. The story and the writing would seem to appeal to the kind of audience that might be intimidated by such a hefty tome. Either that, or be disappointed that it didn’t measure up to the others in the series. ( )
  santhony | Dec 14, 2020 |
I read the pillars of the Earth in the mid eighties. I started it on a plane flight from Florida to Aruba. I enjoyed it and continued the saga as each sequel was published. There is always a fascinating mixture of history and a good story in each volume. The characters are interesting. This is a love story and forms a good foundation and prequel to the series. ( )
  waldhaus1 | Dec 10, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 18) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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"It is 997 CE, the end of the Dark Ages. England is facing attacks from the Welsh in the west and the Vikings in the east. Those in power bend justice according to their will, regardless of ordinary people and often in conflict with the king. Without a clear rule of law, chaos reigns. In these turbulent times, three characters find their lives intertwined: A young boatbuilder's life is turned upside down when the only home he's ever known is raided by Vikings, forcing him and his family to move and start their lives anew in a small hamlet where he does not fit in. . . . A Norman noblewoman marries for love, following her husband across the sea to a new land. But the customs of her husband's homeland are shockingly different, and as she begins to realize that everyone around her is engaged in a constant, brutal battle for power, it becomes clear that a single misstep could be catastrophic. . . . A monk dreams of transforming his humble abbey into a center of learning that will be admired throughout Europe. And each in turn comes into dangerous conflict with a clever and ruthless bishop who will do anything to increase his wealth and power. Thirty years ago, Ken Follett published his most popular novel, The Pillars of the Earth. Now, Follett's masterful new prequel The Evening and the Morning takes us on an epic journey into a historical past rich with ambition and rivalry, death and birth, love and hate, that will end where The Pillars of the Earth begins"--

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