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The flâneur : a stroll through the…
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The flâneur : a stroll through the paradoxes of Paris (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2001; vuoden 2015 painos)

– tekijä: Edmund White

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
8362019,879 (3.65)23
Aflaneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone who ambles through city streets in search of adventure and fulfillment. Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. In the hands of the learned White, a walk through Paris is both a tour of its lush, sometimes prurient history, and an evocation of the city's spirit. The Flaneur leads us to bookshops and boutiques, monuments and palaces, giving us a glimpse the inner human drama. Along the way we learn everything from the latest debates among French lawmakers to the juicy details of Colette's life.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:fionaboyd
Teoksen nimi:The flâneur : a stroll through the paradoxes of Paris
Kirjailijat:Edmund White
Info:London : Bloomsbury, 2015.
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:-

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

The Flâneur: A Stroll through the Paradoxes of Paris (tekijä: Edmund White) (2001)

  1. 10
    Paris: The Biography of a City (tekijä: Colin Jones) (mercure)
    mercure: A more complete history of Paris, with lots of street names.
  2. 00
    Apple of My Eye (tekijä: Helene Hanff) (tandah)
  3. 00
    Rooman salaisuudet : muistoja, kertomuksia ja henkilöitä (tekijä: Corrado Augias) (mercure)
    mercure: Same idea, different city.
  4. 00
    Paris méconnu (tekijä: Jacques Garance) (mercure)
    mercure: Lots of minor sites around the city in this book if you want to make your own flâner less randomly.
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englanti (19)  saksa (1)  Kaikki kielet (20)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 20) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
A flâneur is always open to diversion. He lives in the knowledge that the direct line between A B is seldom the most interesting.
In this book, White, the compleat flâneur, shares his discovery of a city that offers rich rewards for any who practice the art. Along the way, White explores not only geographical spots (many off the beaten path) but also people who live on the margin—Jews, blacks, gays, Arabs and even members of the competing sects of royalists and monarchists.
This urbane book was the perfect companion on my way to revisit Paris for the first time in over thirty years. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
I had not realized that this was part of a series: The Writer and the City, "...an occasional series in which some of the finest writers of our time reveal the secrets of the city they know best." On my semi-infinite to-read pile now.
  kencf0618 | Apr 29, 2021 |
I bought this because of the title, I love the idea of being a flaneur and histories of shopping and department stores often refer to Balzac's works about wandering around Paris. Also because the cove is absolutely beautiful. It wasn't as poetic or geographical as I expected, but it was still very interesting. White muses on Parisian literary figures, the black, Jewish and gay stories of Paris, and royalists/monarchists, not physically wandering but pottering about in the city's history, I guess. I'd recommend it to anyone visiting Paris as a different way of seeing the city (with a few alternative locations to head for). ( )
  Deborahrs | Apr 15, 2017 |
White wonders as he wanders the streets of Paris - educating us and acquainting us with historical background of his favorite city. He explores many of the unique museums and recounts some interesting historical moments that have shaped the city. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
http://wp.me/puHkv-3eg
This is a short book, part of Bloomsbury’s The Writer and the City series, in which, according to the back cover blurb here, ‘some of the finest writers of our time reveal the secrets of the city they know best’. Peter Carey’s self-indulgent and forgettable [30 Days in Sydney] was part of the series, and New South’s generally excellent Cities series may have been inspired by it.

There are five chapters: a general introduction to the idea of the flâneur and the general complexity of Paris is followed by essays about French (and mostly Parisian) attitudes on race, Jews and homosexuality, with an inserted chapter on eccentric and little known museums, and a final chapter on the weirdness that is the French monarchist and royalist movements. In other words, the bulk of the book is taken up with considerations of French culture through the lens of US-style identity politics, in particular through the lens of US gay culture. There’s very little wandering the streets, though the text does wander through its chosen themes in an appropriately unpurposeful way.

I enjoyed the mini-essays on Colette, Sidney Bechet and Josephine Baker. White gives a fascinating account of the Club des Hachichins (frequented by Baudelaire, Balzac and Gautier, if you can frequent something that only happened half a dozen times). White’s discussion of why AIDS was had so much higher an incidence in Paris than in London raises interesting questions about identity politics (big in the US, sneered at in Paris – guess which attitude turns out to be superior!). The stories of a number of individual 19th century Jews are strikingly similar to the story of Charles Ephrussi in [The Hare with Amber Eyes] – in a good way.

There's all that, and much more that’s enjoyable and illuminating, but overall I was irritated. I grew tired of the name dropping (he once dined with Foucault), the preening (his Parisian dinner-party comrades hadn’t noticed until he mentioned it that Paris is no longer a predominantly white city), the false modesty (he once gave a talk on Genet to a Palestinian audience, who surprised him by loving it even though he is white and Western), the persistent essentialising of ‘the French’ and ‘Parisians’ and the unremitting gay perspective (the most emphatic detail in his description of a mosque is that the Gay men who cruise its hamam on Sundays don’t touch each other out of respect for the religious environment). ( )
1 ääni shawjonathan | Sep 4, 2013 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 20) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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If I were to say, as I believe, that kindliness is the distinguishing characteristic of Parisians, I am afraid I should offend them. "I don't want to be kind!" -- Stendhal, Love.
"I've been thinking, I should have come back to Canada with you as another distressed Canadian."
"But you wouldn't. You were in love with Paris. You thought it was the Great Good Place. Well, it's not. You were in love with a dream."
I see he was right. It was a dream of excellence and beauty, one that does not exist anywhere in real life. Montparnasse and its people came very close to it. But no city or society in the world, even the Paris of those days, can realize the elusive dream I had. -- John Glassco, "Memoirs of Montparnasse"
Having lived in Paris unfits you for living anywhere, including Paris. -- John Ashbery (quoted in "The Last Avant-Garde" by David Lehman)
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'To Marilyn Schaefer, my favourite flaneur'
Ensimmäiset sanat
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Paris is a big city, in the sense that London and New York are big cities and that Rome is a village, Los Angeles a collection of villages, and Zurich a backwater.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
La Défense went directly from being futuristic to being passé without ever seeming like a normal feature of the present.

Honestly, instead of 'like a normal feature of the present' I almost wrote 'without ever being inscribed within the interior of the present'.  That's how much I've been submerged in contemporary French nonfiction.   I frequently have to stop and ask myself how a human being might put the same idea. (p.2)
Oh, it's all there – except a truly refined and elegant Italian meal (the French think all the Italians eat is pizza).  The other thing that is missing is a decent public library system.  There's no library that has open stacks for browsers – that paradise of intellectual serendipity.  (p.15)
I had to explain to [a young French couple] that American-style feminism had retrained men not to ogle women – but that, more significantly, Americans consider the sidewalk an anonymous backstage space, whereas for the French it is the stage itself.  An American office worker on her way to work will not worry about her appearance; she'll change out of her gym shoes into her heels only when she enters her office, whereas a French woman will feel that the instant she hits the street she's onstage.   Clothes, hair and make-up must be impeccable.  (p.44-45)
I asked a French couple who recently visited me in New York for their first impressions after just twenty-four hours in America.  The wife said, 'In New York you can tell by people's body language that no one cares what other people think of them, whereas in Paris everyone is judging everyone and the only people who have this American-style insouciance are the insane. (p.45)
A secret memo from General Pershing to his French counterparts forbade fraternization between black Americans and white French soldier; the two nations were expressly forbidden even to shake hands across racial lines.  Apparently, back in the States, Southern racists were particularly worried that contact with the French would give 'their' Negroes 'uppity' ideas.

Their fears were justified.  Although many French peasants were frightened by their appearance and their reputation as savages, the American blacks' dignity and politeness instantly reassured them.  Soon the success of black American soldiers with French women infuriated the white Americans, and white racist antagonism against their own countrymen puzzled the French.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

Aflaneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone who ambles through city streets in search of adventure and fulfillment. Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. In the hands of the learned White, a walk through Paris is both a tour of its lush, sometimes prurient history, and an evocation of the city's spirit. The Flaneur leads us to bookshops and boutiques, monuments and palaces, giving us a glimpse the inner human drama. Along the way we learn everything from the latest debates among French lawmakers to the juicy details of Colette's life.

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