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Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the…
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Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in… (vuoden 2020 painos)

– tekijä: Candacy Taylor (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1117188,823 (4.21)7
The first book to explore the historical role and residual impact of the Green Book, a travel guide for black motorists. Published from 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was hailed as the "black travel guide to America." At that time, it was very dangerous and difficult for African-Americans to travel because black travelers couldn't eat, sleep, or buy gas at most white-owned businesses. The Green Book listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, and other businesses that were safe for black travelers. It was a resourceful and innovative solution to a horrific problem. It took courage to be listed in the Green Book, and 'Overground Railroad' celebrates the stories of those who put their names in the book and stood up against segregation. It shows the history of the Green Book, how we arrived at our present historical moment, and how far we still have to go when it comes to race relations in America.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:5ABC
Teoksen nimi:Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America
Kirjailijat:Candacy Taylor (Tekijä)
Info:Abrams Press (2020), Edition: Illustrated, 360 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
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Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America (tekijä: Candacy Taylor)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 7) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
There are things we don't know, but can learn. Just as there are things we can learn, but never really know. This book travels a familiar road unrecognizable to many of us. Fascinating, heart-breaking, disturbing and hopeful. Not an academic volume, but full of revelation. ( )
  Lemeritus | Dec 16, 2020 |
I thought I knew the story of the Green Book, but from the beginning I knew I did not know that much. It never occurred to me why Blacks in the 1930’and 1940’s chose to drive at night. Nor did I know how the automobile industry helped Blacks find work. Taylor’s trip across America to find the ruminates of what was presented in the Green book was heartbreaking in the discovery than less than 5% of the businesses are still in operation. I listened to the audiobook, which was good, but because of the accompanying photographs and drawings, I would prefer this book in print. I do not even recommend Kindle. ( )
  brangwinn | Sep 29, 2020 |
4.5/5 stars

WOW!
The power of sharing personal true stories rings through time and time again with Taylor’s tribute to the Green Book and those Black individuals, couples, and families who traveled the “Overground Railroad” - powerful primary source documents and photographs are juxtaposed amid poignant prose.

Quotes of Note:
“History doesn’t repeat itself. Humans do.” - Jelani Cobb

Langston Hughes poem, “Beaumont to Detroit: 1943”

“I don’t care if you’re the pope or the president...You have to eat. And I can cook for you...If I can get the people on both sides [of the political spectrum] to just sit down at my table, I think we can work this out.” Leah Chase, owner & chef, Dookey Chase’s, New Orleans, Louisiana

My next read in relation to this book will be Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, which has been on my TBR list. ( )
  Lisa_Francine | Aug 5, 2020 |
This is a handsome book and kudos to the design team which produced this book. Segregation meant that a guide was necessary beyond word of mouth where African Americans would be welcome: not only lodging and restaurants, but gas stations and drug stores. Not only auto travel is covered but also travel by train, which had its own rules on segregation. Blacks were not fond of Route 66 as there was no list of sundown towns and distances between potential stopping places were long. The Green Book was published from 1936 to 1966. ( )
  vpfluke | Jun 29, 2020 |
There is much to appreciate in this book, but frankly, it's a bit of a mess. It's not a professionally written history book. In the end, I wasn't sure if the project of documenting The Green Book prompted the author's diversion of focus away from it, or if it was the other way around, the project was used as a structure to get at the issues she really wanted to talk about all along. What did I appreciate? Certainly, reading about a number of "facilities" from the not so distant past that provided comfort and safety to those of America who had no expectation of getting what all Americans should be able to get regardless of their race. This book certainly gives much depth to what a white reader, and maybe even some younger black readers, might have first been introduced to in the recent movie, Green Book. A dimension of the social dynamics that even made The Green Book necessary in the first place were the "sundown towns" in which blacks were banned from being in for any reason after sundown. Not just on the other side of the tracks, so to speak, but not in town at all. This book makes it perfectly clear this was not an issue only in Southern states, as the movie mentioned earlier might suggest. It's in a chapter about Route 66, the notable U.S. highway where it became crystal clear to me how much my own connection to past racist towns was so obvious. To start, my younger brother was born in a former sundown town in Illinois. My older brother went to college in a different town where barbershops had been segregated. My wife was born in another town where the Klu Klux Klan had held cross-burning rallies in a popular tourist location, and a cousin lives in a former sundown town in California. None of these places were in former Confederate states. My, my, weren't we white folks wide spread in our American racism? On the negative side, there are a number of little things -- which I will not itemize here -- that show a lack of professionalism in producing this book, but the one that really floored me was the author's error on knowing when Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated and when Richard Nixon took office as U.S. president. I mean google it, why not, even if you weren't alive yet, like I was. Ultimately, that leads me to the final impression I ended up with, that the author approaches the information she has on issues very much like too many people on social media do, i.e. not knowing what they don't know, but assuming they know all that is needed to be known. ( )
  larryerick | May 28, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 7) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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For Ron, Mom, Aimee, Adger, Sophie, and Chris
Ensimmäiset sanat
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Introduction: "Don't you dare say a word."
Chapter One: As Ron hurried down the plush carpeted stairs on his way to the garage, carrying a stack of Screamin' Jay Hawkins and Howlin' Wolf CDs, he said, "Okay. I'm ready to roll!" I stared at him and shook my head. "It's after ten o'clock. Why can't you drive during the day, like a normal person?" His answer was always the same. "Traffic."
Sitaatit
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After scouting more than 3,600 Green Book sites, I realized that most of my well-meaning liberal friends in the coastal cities had never seen the poverty that millions of Americans are living in. By the time I got to Detroit, after leaving Los Angeles and driving across the country, I was in tears.
The sites that are still with us symbolize survival: They endured the times the pendulum swung forward and a wrecking ball swung back. These businesses survived urban renewal, gentrification, and white supremacist policies. And the people in these communities survived underfunded schools and overfunded prisons. All of this cemented my faith that we would survive Trump.
Driving too slowly, however, could also attract attention, so to avoid getting pulled over, most black men at the time learned to drive a mile or two under the speed limit. A slower car in front could pose yet another problem for black motorists in Jim Crow states, where it was illegal for a black driver to pass a white driver.
Black Americans who went to mainstream banks for auto financing were generally denied loans, but even after World War II, the roughly 3 percent of black men who received bank credit were often charged higher interest rates than white customers. Moreover, black men living in the South needed a white man to cosign for a loan. (Women of any race were denied credit without a male cosigner until well into the 1970s.)
In 1930, a few years before Cadillac opened its showroom doors to African Americans, journalist George Schuyler addressed this issue, saying that “Blacks who drove expensive cars offended white sensibilities, and some blacks kept to older models so as not to give the dangerous impression of being above themselves.”
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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The first book to explore the historical role and residual impact of the Green Book, a travel guide for black motorists. Published from 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was hailed as the "black travel guide to America." At that time, it was very dangerous and difficult for African-Americans to travel because black travelers couldn't eat, sleep, or buy gas at most white-owned businesses. The Green Book listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, and other businesses that were safe for black travelers. It was a resourceful and innovative solution to a horrific problem. It took courage to be listed in the Green Book, and 'Overground Railroad' celebrates the stories of those who put their names in the book and stood up against segregation. It shows the history of the Green Book, how we arrived at our present historical moment, and how far we still have to go when it comes to race relations in America.

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