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Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse…
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Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1985; vuoden 2005 painos)

– tekijä: Neil Postman (Tekijä), Andrew Postman (Johdanto)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
4,384551,948 (4.15)31
In this eloquent and persuasive book, Neil Postman examines the deep and broad effects of television culture on the manner in which we conduct our public affairs, on how "entertainment values" have corrupted the very way we think. As politics, news, religion, education, and commerce are given expression less and less in the form of printed or spoken words, they are rapidly being reshaped and staged to suit the requirements of television. And because television is a visual medium, whose images are most pleasurably apprehended when they are fast-moving and dynamic, discourse on television takes the form of entertainment. Television has little tolerance for argument, hypothesis, or explanation it demands performing art. Mr. Postman argues that public discourse, the advancing of arguments in logical order for the public good-once the hallmark of American culture-is being converted from exposition and explanation to entertainment.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:AmandaGStevens
Teoksen nimi:Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business
Kirjailijat:Neil Postman (Tekijä)
Muut tekijät:Andrew Postman (Johdanto)
Info:Penguin Books (2005), Edition: Anniversary, 208 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):****
Avainsanoja:-

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Huvitamme itsemme hengiltä : julkinen keskustelu viihteen valtakaudella (tekijä: Neil Postman) (1985)

  1. 40
    Uljas uusi maailma (tekijä: Aldous Huxley) (jstamp26)
  2. 00
    Hate Inc.: Why Today’s Media Makes Us Despise One Another (tekijä: Matt Taibbi) (themulhern)
    themulhern: Neil Postman's book is so much better, but Matt Taibibi's is so much more recent. Neil Postman is more interesting, more educated, and avoids the wierd cheap shots and obscenities directed at person's I've never heard of that Matt Taibibi enjoys. I guess Taibibi's is worth it for the supporting facts, which apparently he has the inside scoop on.… (lisätietoja)
  3. 00
    Loserthink: How Untrained Brains Are Ruining America (tekijä: Scott Adams) (themulhern)
    themulhern: There is a surprising amount of overlap between the views of the news that both books have.
  4. 00
    Anathem (tekijä: Neal Stephenson) (themulhern)
    themulhern: Stephenson himself remarked that Anathem was a book about how people don't read books anymore. Moreover, there is a delightfully satirical sequence in which the characters are discussing serious things over food at a rest stop, and the narrator is repeatedly distracted by images on the speelies that are incoherent yet commanding. Later, the protagonist realizes that one of these images was relevant, and there is another bit of satire.… (lisätietoja)
  5. 00
    The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom (tekijä: Yochai Benkler) (chiudrele)
    chiudrele: Explains how today's world of internet is different from the old world of television. Society is not merely consuming information and culture, it can also participate in creation of it.
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englanti (54)  hollanti (1)  Kaikki kielet (55)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 55) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
This book I realize now after reading it again has been a significant influence in how I see the world, and it deserves fuller exploration. I book-marked many places. Here are my bookmarks from the first half of the book:

---

"We are all... great abbreviators, meaning that none of us has the wit to know the whole truth, the time to tell it if we believed we did, or an audience so gullible so as to accept it."

"The clearest way to see through a culture is to attend to its tools for conversation."

"The God of the Jews was to exist in the word and through the word, an unprecedented conception requiring the highest order of abstract thinking. Iconography thus became blasphemy, so that a new kind of god could enter a culture. People like ourselves who are in the process of converting their culture from word-centered to image-centered might profit by reflecting on this Mosaic conjunction. But even if I am wrong in these conjectures, it is a wise and particularly relevant supposition that the media of communication available to a culture are a dominate influence on the formation of the culture's intellectual and social preoccupations."

The best things on television are it's junk.... We do not measure a culture by its output of undisguised trivialities, but by what it claims as significant.

The River Metaphor
"I find it useful to think of the situation in this way. Changes in the symbolic environment are like changes in the natural environment: they are both gradual and additive at first, and then all at once, a critical mass is achieved... a river that has slowly been polluted, suddenly becomes toxic. Most of the fish perish. Swimming becomes a danger to health. But even then the river may look the same and one may still take a boat ride on it. In other words, even when life has been taken from it, the river does not disappear, nor do all of its uses, but its value has been seriously diminished, and its degraded condition will have harmful effects through the landscape. It is this way with our symbolic environment. We have reached I believe a critical mass in that electronic media have decisively and irreversibly changed the character of our symbolic environment. We are now a culture whose information, ideas, and epistemology are given form by the television, not by the printed word....
In the analogy I have drawn above, the river refers largely to what we call 'public discourse,' our political, religious, informational, and commercial forms of conversation. I am arguing that a television based epistemology pollutes public communication and its surrounding landscape, not that it pollutes everything...."
This resonates as truth for me. Today, the more people "swim" in the river of media and in particular politics, often the less healthy they mentally become.

"The telegraph made a three-pronged attack on typography's definition of discourse, introducing on a large scale irrelevence, impotence, and incoherence."

At the end of chapter five Postman lays out a summary of the rest of the book:
"It is my object in the rest of this book to make the epistemology of television visible again. I will try to demonstrate by concrete example that television's way of knowing is uncompromisingly hostile to typography's way of knowing, that television's conversations promote incoherence and triviality, that the phrase 'serious television' is a contradiction in terms and that television speaks in only one persistent voice, the voice of entertainment. Beyond that I will try to demonstrate that to enter the great television conversation, one great American cultural institution after another is learning to speak its terms. Television in other words is transforming our culture into one vast arena for show-business. It is entirely possible of course that in the end we shall find that delightful and decide we like it just fine. That is exactly what Aldous Huxley feared was coming, 50 years ago."

This book was written in 1985. His prophetic message has been fulfilled in 2020. Not sure what that means for the future... ( )
1 ääni nrt43 | Dec 29, 2020 |
If you watch TV, and care at all about how public discourse is important to a democracy, then this book is for you. Every bit as relevant in 2015 as it was when it was first published in 1985. Actually, this may be even more relevant today with social media than it was originally when focusing only on TV. ( )
  pedstrom | Dec 22, 2020 |
I’ve never really been a TV addict. Oh, I’ve watched plenty of television fare in my time, but I’ve always been more interested in comics and books, I think, because of their permanence. TV, until the advent of the videocassette recorder, had been extremely ephemeral.

The ephemeral nature of TV, which continues even today because of its incredible volume and prevalence in society, is the basic tenet of Postman’s argument here. By its very nature, Postman says, TV is incapable of presenting true public discourse, which relies on arguments that don’t necessarily have the entertainment quotient necessary for the medium. The rest of the book expounds on this, looking at the past history of public discourse in America up to the time this book was written, which was ten years ago. In the last ten years, TV’s influence on public policy has even increased, and it would be interesting to see what Postman has to say about it now.
  engelcox | Oct 30, 2020 |
Bailed at 22%.
  joyblue | Sep 18, 2020 |
Written in the mid 80's 'Amusing Our Selves to Death' remains a damning indictment of what a runaway entertainment mindset has done to American culture. Things are not better, if anything, things are worse. Celebrity culture has taken over the web and the websites of most major newspapers. What to do? Kill your TV. There are tools now so that you can pick and choose what you want to see. Also limit your time online. Read, listen to music, go to a concert, get outside, Join a book club. Don't let Hollywood rent space in your head.
( )
2 ääni Steve_Walker | Sep 13, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 55) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
The dismal message of this landmark book is that, while we've kept our eye out for Orwell's world all along, we have smoothly moved into living in Huxley's. Through our own compliance, our implicit assent, and our endless desire to be entertained, we have allowed the television to behave as our soma and let happen unto us what, were it made an explicit part of the social contract, we would never have accepted. Orwell was a cartoon, while Huxley is our reality—and we don't even know it.
 
A lucid and very funny jeremiad about how public discourse has been degraded.
lisäsi ArrowStead | muokkaaMother Jones
 
He starts where Marshall McLuhan left off, constructing his arguments with the resources of a scholar and the wit of a raconteur.
lisäsi ArrowStead | muokkaaChristian Science Monitor
 
A brilliant, powerful and important book...This is a brutal indictment Postman has laid down and, so far as I can see, an irrefutable one.
lisäsi ArrowStead | muokkaaWashington Post Book World, Jonathan Yardley
 

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You may get a sense of what is meant by context-free information by asking yourself the following question: How often does it occur that information provided you on morning radio or television, or in the morning newspaper, causes you to alter your plans for the day, or to take some action you would not otherwise have taken, or provides insight into some problem you are required to solve?
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (2)

In this eloquent and persuasive book, Neil Postman examines the deep and broad effects of television culture on the manner in which we conduct our public affairs, on how "entertainment values" have corrupted the very way we think. As politics, news, religion, education, and commerce are given expression less and less in the form of printed or spoken words, they are rapidly being reshaped and staged to suit the requirements of television. And because television is a visual medium, whose images are most pleasurably apprehended when they are fast-moving and dynamic, discourse on television takes the form of entertainment. Television has little tolerance for argument, hypothesis, or explanation it demands performing art. Mr. Postman argues that public discourse, the advancing of arguments in logical order for the public good-once the hallmark of American culture-is being converted from exposition and explanation to entertainment.

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