KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

Wake, Siren: Ovid Resung

– tekijä: Nina MacLaughlin

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
975217,994 (4.29)3
A powerful, feminist retelling, Wake, Siren: Ovid Resung channels the fierce, textured voices of the women in Ovid's Metamorphoses, as they claim their stories and challenge the power of mythI am the home of this story. After thousands of years of other people's tellings, of all these different bridges, of words gotten wrong, I'll tell it myself.Seductresses and she-monsters, nymphs and demi-goddesses, populate the famous myths of Ovid's Metamorphoses. But what happens when the story of the chase comes in the voice of the woman fleeing her rape? When the beloved coolly returns the seducer's gaze? When tales of monstrous transfiguration are sung by those transformed? In voices both mythic and modern, Wake, Siren revisits each account of love, loss, rape, revenge, and change. It lays bare the violence that undergirds and lurks in the heart of Ovid's narratives, stories that helped build and perpetuate the distorted portrayal of women across centuries of art and literature. Drawing on the rhythms of epic poetry and alt rock, of everyday speech and folk song, of fireside whisperings and therapy sessions, Nina MacLaughlin, the acclaimed author of Hammer Head, recovers what is lost when the stories of women are told and translated by men. She breathes new life into these fraught and well-loved myths.… (lisätietoja)
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 3 mainintaa

näyttää 5/5
I pre-ordered this book despite my pickiness about short stories based about 90% on the cover. Plus the premise was pretty intriguing: giving voice to all the voiceless women of Ovid's Metamorphoses -- the monsters, the demi-goddesses, the brazen, the raped, the transfigured.

Make no mistake about it -- this is a difficult and disturbing book. MacLaughlin may give these women a voice, sometimes a backstory and sometimes a redemption/recovery story -- but none of that changes their fates -- no matter how much you may wish some miracle will let them dodge at the last moment -- give a different reply, choose a different forest to wander in, swallow their pride for one fateful instant. Metamorphoses doesn't treat women particularly well, and al of that is still here - all the rape, all the dismemberment, all the victim-blaming and abuse.

So what does change? Plenty. This is an experimental collection and each story is reimagined in a different way. Some maintain a timeless mythical/fairy-tale quality, others go farther afield -- one story mostly a form of typographic poetry/word art, one story told mostly through emails. Many of the women have modern, profanity-laced speech (though if anyone is justified to be a little sweary!) With such variety, some stories are bound to land better with certain readers than others. But the overall effect -- centering the woman's voice, changing up the forms, making them all just a little unfamiliar and new, is one of erasing the distance, of creating new empathy, of rage and fury. At this #metoo moment, at the way many of these women's stories have been romanticized for centuries, at the familiarity of all of it.

Difficult, but I found it ultimately rewarding. ( )
1 ääni greeniezona | May 2, 2021 |
An exceptional revisiting of Ovid's Metamorphoses, at times frayed at the edges, yet always making you think and rethink from another point of view. It's a hard read, and by that I mean emotionally, but again, it's worth the price of entry. Some of the stories I found particularly interesting to me were: Daphne, Tiresias, Syrinx, Io, Scylla, Medusa, Arethusa, Procne and Philomena, Baucis (a happy one), and Eurydice. I really thought the story of Thetis would be great for retelling, but I didn't like this one. It read more like an exercise in writing rather than thinking. Overall, an excellent entry into this blossoming field of revisiting the classics from different points of view. ( )
  drew_asson | Dec 3, 2020 |
"Open the cabinet. Move the cinnamon. Move the nutmeg. Move the coriander, the cardamom pods, the cumin, the cloves. Move the small dark bottle of vanilla extract and the oregano and the garam masala you've only used twice. There, the small jar with whole leaves the length of your pink. Those are me, mine. I was the first of all the laurel trees, and my bay leaves still season your sauces and stews..."

Wake, Siren starts with a strong concept: a collection of short stories based on the minor characters of Greek mythologies. From Medusa to Daphne, MacLaughlin gives a voice to 34 of these nymphs, monsters, and minor goddesses. Her stories are filled with quiet rage and injustice, wistfulness and transformation, sadness and loss. Many of the stories deal with difficult topics such as rape, incest, and violence against women. Some of the reviewers have mentioned that the content is overly gratuitous and graphic; however, I would disagree as it grounds these myths in reality; there are women today who face the same issues and to write a sanitized version of these stories would be a great disservice to them.

There are a few standouts in the book, namely "Callisto," "Io," and "Pygmalion," but other stories feel redundant. To be fair, I find it hard to fault MacLaughlin for the repetitiveness of her writing as her source material is hardly original. Women in the ancient myths were portrayed very simply as objects of lust or warnings to others. Attract a husband's wandering eye, and you may develop bovine features overnight. Boast too loudly and an envious goddess might turn you into a spider. There are only so many ways the same story can be told. ( )
  hianbai | Apr 13, 2020 |
I had to put this one down for a while. I think these stories are beautifully written, more like poems than stories, but the content is difficult. There is so much sex, and most of it is nonconsensual, and some is incestuous or with children or with animals. I realize the author is simply retelling Ovid and this is the subject matter, but it's very triggering.
  sturlington | Mar 31, 2020 |
Tiresias: Was it punishment, being turned into a woman? I don’t know. Is it punishing to be a woman? It is. It will continue to be.
This collection is a slap in the face… followed by a gut-punch. Rinse. Repeat. Seriously. The hits just keep on coming. It isn’t news that Greco-Roman myths are filled with violence, vengeance and misery. But, reading them in this collection crystallizes this in a way that is brutal and heavy and horrible... But, also really awesome.
I know, make up your mind, right? But, I can’t think of a better way to say it. Of the three dozen stories in the collection there are nearly as many rapes, quite a few murders, and only a very rare happy ending (maybe a few more I’d credit as bittersweet). It isn’t a fun read. Instead it is a confrontational read, full of justifiable fury and only occasional moments of anything near hopefulness. That being said, I found much of it beautiful, even when the stories were dark or disgusting and crass, the writing was great. Diverse and compelling. And these stories – be they real or fictional should be read, confronted, honored… They might be about Scylla, Io and a bunch of mythical others, but I’d be surprised if they didn’t ring true for most contemporary readers.
The narrative voices are not interchangeable – which is a real feat considering how briefly we meet and interact with each character and how many of them tell a variation on the same ‘I-tried-to-run-from-my-rapist-but-I-did-not-escape’ story. The stories are set historically, as well as in the present day and the writing style varies by story, as such some are more effective than others – and I’m sure that hugely varies by reader. Personally, I wanted to gouge my own eyes out during the stream of consciousness one (though it might have been the only funny on in the book. Bummer).
The women in these stories, some are only B-characters in mythology and most of us will know little about them beyond maybe their names – so I’m not sure what new ground, if any, is being tread here in that sense. And, I’m sure if I were a student of mythology I’d have been a better educated reader and that would have added depth to the experience – that’s my loss, I suppose. I assume that reading these stories from the viewpoints of these women is the new ground here and this book does that much stunningly… 3 dozen times.

My faves: Daphne, Arachne, Atalanta, Myrrha, Baucis, Medusa, Leucothoe, Eurydice (and After Ovid is an amazing epilogue. A gorgeous ending to the collection).

My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for the arc to review.
( )
  alailiander | Oct 24, 2019 |
näyttää 5/5
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

A powerful, feminist retelling, Wake, Siren: Ovid Resung channels the fierce, textured voices of the women in Ovid's Metamorphoses, as they claim their stories and challenge the power of mythI am the home of this story. After thousands of years of other people's tellings, of all these different bridges, of words gotten wrong, I'll tell it myself.Seductresses and she-monsters, nymphs and demi-goddesses, populate the famous myths of Ovid's Metamorphoses. But what happens when the story of the chase comes in the voice of the woman fleeing her rape? When the beloved coolly returns the seducer's gaze? When tales of monstrous transfiguration are sung by those transformed? In voices both mythic and modern, Wake, Siren revisits each account of love, loss, rape, revenge, and change. It lays bare the violence that undergirds and lurks in the heart of Ovid's narratives, stories that helped build and perpetuate the distorted portrayal of women across centuries of art and literature. Drawing on the rhythms of epic poetry and alt rock, of everyday speech and folk song, of fireside whisperings and therapy sessions, Nina MacLaughlin, the acclaimed author of Hammer Head, recovers what is lost when the stories of women are told and translated by men. She breathes new life into these fraught and well-loved myths.

No library descriptions found.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Pikalinkit

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (4.29)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4 5
4.5 1
5 5

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 158,911,289 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä