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On the clock : what low-wage work did to me…
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On the clock : what low-wage work did to me and how it drives America… (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2019; vuoden 2019 painos)

– tekijä: Emily Guendelsberger

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1108198,270 (4.23)3
"Nickel and Dimed for the Amazon age," (Salon) the bitingly funny, eye-opening story of finding work in the automated and time-starved world of hourly low-wage labor After the local newspaper where she worked as a reporter closed, Emily Guendelsberger took a pre-Christmas job at an Amazon fulfillment center outside Louisville, Kentucky. There, the vending machines were stocked with painkillers, and the staff turnover was dizzying. In the new year, she travelled to North Carolina to work at a call center, a place where even bathroom breaks were timed to the second. And finally, Guendelsberger was hired at a San Francisco McDonald's, narrowly escaping revenge-seeking customers who pelted her with condiments. Across three jobs, and in three different parts of the country, Guendelsberger directly took part in the revolution changing the U.S. workplace. Offering an up-close portrait of America's actual "essential workers," ON THE CLOCK examines the broken social safety net as well as an economy that has purposely had all the slack drained out and converted to profit. Until robots pack boxes, resolve billing issues, and make fast food, human beings supervised by AI will continue to get the job done. Guendelsberger shows us how workers went from being the most expensive element of production to the cheapest - and how low wage jobs have been remade to serve the ideals of efficiency, at the cost of humanity. ON THE CLOCK explores the lengths that half of Americans will go to in order to make a living, offering not only a better understanding of the modern workplace, but also surprising solutions to make work more humane for millions of Americans.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Chinesa72
Teoksen nimi:On the clock : what low-wage work did to me and how it drives America insane
Kirjailijat:Emily Guendelsberger
Info:New York : Little, Brown and Company, 2019.
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto, Aion lukea
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:to-read

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On the Clock: What Low-Wage Work Did to Me and How It Drives America Insane (tekijä: Emily Guendelsberger) (2019)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 8) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Intriguing Premise Hurt By Lack of Evidence. This is one of those books that has an intriguing premise and brings some often overlooked aspects to the table and is thus worthy of and even needed in the national conversation, but that is ultimately tainted by the author's own biases and lack of empirical evidence and lack of extensive bibliography. The author does a phenomenal job of showing what it is like to work in the environments she chose to work in - an Amazon Fulfillment Center, a call center, and a franchise McDonald's - and the people who work there. But as she admits repeatedly, she could always leave at any time she wanted - while she rarely if ever mentions what her husband does for work, she does mention during one ordeal at the call center that her father in law is a doctor - and the entire point of getting these jobs was to "test the waters" to see what people who worked them were really like and what their concerns really were. Very well written, just with significant flaws in reasoning due to her own biases, particularly in her ultimate conclusions. Could have been far stronger, but still a recommended read. ( )
  BookAnonJeff | Jul 11, 2021 |
If you thought [book:Nickel and Dimed|1869] was bad, I regret to inform you that things have gotten way worse in the past 20 years. (And since this book was published, I can't imagine that things have gotten any better, especially now that COVID has hit.)

I think everybody should have to read this book. And then, instead of doing like the last few pages and "feeling optimistic," we should agitate for change. And support the people agitating for change. Things are not going to get better unless labor wrestles away some of the control that capital has. ( )
  lemontwist | Mar 11, 2021 |
What a fantastic book! I've worked many crappy low-wage jobs in my life, but I've been out of that game for nearly a decade. Even if you think you know what it's like, if it's been 10 years or more, you likely don't know what it's like to work those jobs today. The low-wage work environment has changed extremely swiftly, and it's only gotten worse for the worker.

The author takes jobs at an Amazon warehouse, Convergys call center, and a McDonald's, and describes the experiences in harrowing detail. These types of environments are highly automated, expect employees to act like a robot, and encourage you to not be a messy human with biological and familial needs.

The point is not that these particular companies are terrible places to work, but that these industries have evolved unilaterally to be even more dehumanizing for workers, for very little pay. She also gets into some of the psychology of what this type of environment does to a person's outlook, and how it may have resulted in our Trumpian presidency.
This should be required reading for everyone.

P.S. This book gave me horrible visceral flashbacks to my call center days. Now I'm having nightmares, ugh! ( )
  LAKobow | Dec 17, 2020 |
As someone who spent a lot of time in food service (two years in a chronically understaffed Dunkin Donuts in New England and four years in a hellscape Italian restaurant full of mismanagement and out-of-touch ownership, both for less than $9/hr and demanding more of my time than I could give), I have to give ENORMOUS props to Emily Guendelsberger for actually doing the work and writing honestly about her experiences. I appreciated the perspective from multiple low-wage jobs; warehouses and call centers don't employ many people out where I live, and it was enlightening to look into these industries a little bit. I appreciated the perspective from other employees on each job, especially those that differed vehemently on the work from Guendelsberger's, the human approach to research and history, and the author's own voice. Honestly, if I had to describe this book in its entirety, it would be "human". I love ripping apart corporate greed as much as the next young person, but there's a lot to be said for the analytical approach taken throughout (but especially in the third part of the book) to the very nature of corporate business which certainly helped reign in some of the rage I was feeling as someone who has worked in fast food. Statistics, history, anecdotes, facts, and a wealth of suggested reading in the back for anyone interested is fascinating.

Overall, though, this book isn't meant for me or people like me who have done this work; in fact, I was super pissed off for about 50% of the time I was reading this. I have a lot of opinions about the ethics of late-stage capitalism, and reading about the way workers across the country are suffering with me just fuels that rage. This book is really meant for the people who make decisions--business owners, management professionals, "white-collar" professionals, and anyone out of touch with how hard "unskilled" labor is on the average person. Thoroughly enjoyed and recommend. ( )
1 ääni kferaco | Jul 19, 2020 |
The author paints a very disturbing and visceral picture of what millions of people are subject to in order to just survive in this country. The lessons I learned from this book are:

1) Be as pleasant and to the point as possible when calling an 800 number. The person on the other end is a PERSON, just like you. And they have to deal with all sorts of pressures you could not dream of (unless you read this book).

2) There is no value in feeling guilty buying stuff from Amazon. The pressures on workers is systemic, its how the business is designed. If orders dropped by 50% tomorrow, they would do things exactly the same way, just with less than have the employees.

3) What this book describes is not capitalism, but modern feudalism. Treating people as disposable parts in a machine is the same, whether the machine is a modern company or a large plot of land owned by a lord.

( )
1 ääni grandpahobo | Sep 26, 2019 |
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

"Nickel and Dimed for the Amazon age," (Salon) the bitingly funny, eye-opening story of finding work in the automated and time-starved world of hourly low-wage labor After the local newspaper where she worked as a reporter closed, Emily Guendelsberger took a pre-Christmas job at an Amazon fulfillment center outside Louisville, Kentucky. There, the vending machines were stocked with painkillers, and the staff turnover was dizzying. In the new year, she travelled to North Carolina to work at a call center, a place where even bathroom breaks were timed to the second. And finally, Guendelsberger was hired at a San Francisco McDonald's, narrowly escaping revenge-seeking customers who pelted her with condiments. Across three jobs, and in three different parts of the country, Guendelsberger directly took part in the revolution changing the U.S. workplace. Offering an up-close portrait of America's actual "essential workers," ON THE CLOCK examines the broken social safety net as well as an economy that has purposely had all the slack drained out and converted to profit. Until robots pack boxes, resolve billing issues, and make fast food, human beings supervised by AI will continue to get the job done. Guendelsberger shows us how workers went from being the most expensive element of production to the cheapest - and how low wage jobs have been remade to serve the ideals of efficiency, at the cost of humanity. ON THE CLOCK explores the lengths that half of Americans will go to in order to make a living, offering not only a better understanding of the modern workplace, but also surprising solutions to make work more humane for millions of Americans.

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