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White – tekijä: Bret Easton Ellis
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White (vuoden 2019 painos)

– tekijä: Bret Easton Ellis

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1485141,091 (3.24)4
"Combining personal reflection and social observation, Bret Easton Ellis's first work of nonfiction is an incendiary polemic about this young century's failings, e-driven and otherwise, and at once an example, definition, and defense of what 'freedom of speech' truly means. Bret Easton Ellis has wrestled with the double-edged sword of fame and notoriety for more than thirty years now, since Less Than Zero catapulted him into the limelight in 1985, earning him devoted fans and, perhaps, even fiercer enemies. An enigmatic figure who has always gone against the grain and refused categorization, he captured the depravity of the eighties with one of contemporary literature's most polarizing characters, American Psycho's iconic, terrifying Patrick Bateman. In recent years, his candor and gallows humor on both Twitter and his podcast have continued his legacy as someone determined to speak the truth, however painful it might be, and whom people accordingly either love or love to hate. He encounters various positions and voices controversial opinions, more often than not fighting the status quo. Now, in White, with the same originality displayed in his fiction, Ellis pours himself out onto the page and, in doing so, eviscerates the perceived good that the social-media age has wrought, starting with the dangerous cult of likeability. White is both a denunciation of censorship, particularly the self-inflicted sort committed in hopes of being 'accepted,' and a bracing view of a life devoted to authenticity. Provocative, incisive, funny, and surprisingly poignant, White reveals not only what is visible on the glittering, pristine surface but also the riotous truths that are hidden underneath"--… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Taliesien
Teoksen nimi:White
Kirjailijat:Bret Easton Ellis
Info:[New York, NY] : Random House Audio, April 15, 2019.
Kokoelmat:2019 Read
Arvio (tähdet):****1/2
Avainsanoja:non-fiction, culture, Audio, scribd

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White (tekijä: Bret Easton Ellis)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatsvafn1r, jodisho4, Hodekin, EmNKC, RayCummings, rri, blacherez, zebb, bordoz
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näyttää 5/5
Meh. I'm "supposed to" like this because he's edgy and something other than a doctrinaire leftist, and he wrote a pretty good book once (American Psycho; apparently Rules of Attraction is good too but I haven't read it yet), but...random author talking about his boring social life and personal problems, linking them to some stupidity with modern popular culture, politics around Twitter, etc. -- still pretty fucking boring. There were a couple interesting anecdotes in the book, ironically all things other people had told him. He should stick to fiction. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
Author spends too much time on social media. ( )
  TeaTimeCoder | Dec 23, 2020 |
I think this is the longest review I've done on Goodreads. I think it's probably because I feel less alone after reading this book. I was sad when it ended. I'm sure that this will get me in trouble in some way, but I'm so tired of feeling alone.

I love BEE. He's of my generation and my experiences with the wider world. Every single one of these essays resounded with me. Growing up in the '70s with space to become who I am, coming to adulthood in the '80s in NYC/the Hamptons during a big drug-fueled party, watching NYC turn into Disneyland in the '90s, leaving NYC and returning to a place that I didn't recognize anymore.

He experienced the same things that I did. Well, he had loads more money, but that used to even out and most experiences were the same for everyone. It's why I get his satire, I'm okay with his ambiguity and I just 'get' it. So many times during the book I had to stop and say, "Oh thank god someone else noticed that."

He's also someone who honestly doesn't give a fuck what people think. That's why people are trashing this book. He lays out some hard truths for the maniacal political types who are completely losing their minds right now. He's apolitical and he says many times during the book that he didn't vote, nor did he care who won the election.

I am interested in politics, but I saw the election as two equally horrible choices. Like BEE, I simply don't want to talk about it anymore. I'd rather talk about other things. Sane things.

He's not talking about Trump in any of the essays. He's talking about our culture. He's talking about the people around him and all of the ways that they have lost the plot. He is revolted by the way people are behaving and shocked by the left's lack of inclusive values. They are willing to cede our most precious rights at the altar of political correctness and group think.

Honestly, that's shocking to those of us who have spent most of our lives on the left. BEE is right on target with his criticisms.

He also talks about movies. Because he's in LA, so of course. I was much less interested in those essays because I don't care as much about movies as he does. ( )
  authenticjoy | Nov 15, 2020 |
Style: short, blog-style articles/rants/opinions that I found easy and pleasant to read.

Subject Matter: Social Media, Popular Culture, Politics, ...
Sometimes interesting, sometimes I skipped articles about topics I didn't care about. Sometimes general, sometimes very specific.

Opinions: Often deliberately controversial, but often also fair. If there is an overall theme to this book it probably is freedom of opinion and freedom of expression and how he makes his points should probably be read in that context.

Conclusion: Mediocre. He makes some valid points about social media and freedom of expression and he offers some interesting tidbits about pop culture and his own experiences with it. But he also drones on long after he's made his points and discusses things that I'd expect few people to care about. It's a quick read, but I imagine most people can find better ways to spend their time. ( )
  igorken | Jun 4, 2020 |
Mr. Ellis is a writer of screenplays. He hobnobs with the rich and famous. He is openly gay and can be caustic and brutally honest, as well. He does not care what people think of him, but rather voices the ideas and opinions he believes in, writes in a way he thinks is true and authentic, and he refuses to yield to those who cry and complain about their “victimhood”, rather than face up to their problems, those that have not grown up or learned to solve them. He doesn’t believe in safe spaces. When he was growing up, not everyone was told they were wonderful, nor did they get participation trophies for showing up. You had to earn your honors and learn to deal with adversity and failure. Ellis said there were not as many suicides since they weren’t surprised by the real world when they faced it; if they failed they got up and tried again. They didn’t expect immediate love and gratification. Homosexuality wasn’t as hot a topic. Black Lives Matters didn’t exist. Alternate lifestyle groups started out with good intentions but then were hijacked by activists with different agendas.
There were no “snowflakes”. Working and earning your place in school, in sports, in industry, everywhere as a matter of fact, was merit based, not based on tender egos that refused to, or were unable to, deal with reality. These weak individuals believed in an alternate reality in which they were guaranteed success. Since failure was not an option, when they failed they could no longer function. These supposed liberal and open minded people who welcomed all, in reality, only welcomed ideas that mirrored their own; they refuse to listen to any of the ideas that disagreed with theirs and claimed they couldn’t deal with the fear it caused them. They required sanctuaries.
Using the rich and famous as examples, some openly gay and some on both sides of the political aisle, he explores the constant outrage that is common today. He examines the presentation of ideas and news by the media, by journalists, by Hollywood bigwigs and by politicians, in the era of Trump. The faux outrage dominates all avenues of society today, and the presentation of ideas is not always accurate or authenticated, sometimes there even seems to be a deliberate intent to deceive. The visible anger is astonishing and palpable, even when it seems very unreasonable and when the cause for it lacks facts and verification. Angry statements are simply accepted and disagreement causes friction between friends and can actually end a friendship or cause the loss of employment. To many, disagreement is unacceptable. They have the one right way and there is no room for any other idea.
Supporting Trump can get you barred or fired so support for him and his accomplishments, which are rarely reported, is often hidden. It can have a very negative influence on business and financial success as boycotts have become de rigueur. The overall outrage is reflected back in the pages of news media, entertainment programs, awards ceremonies, on social media, and in any place a there is a platform where one can earn fifteen minutes more of fame by venting their frustrations. A small group of people has the power to change the way the larger group operates and functions. The needs of the very few are becoming overpowering. Their emotional needs must be met or someone must pay for their pain. Political Correctness is riding high, driven along by its own steam. It is a self perpetuating anger machine.
Because everything is out there to be discussed and judged, there is always someone who is unhappy. Ellis seems to believe that the millennial generation is spoiled, irresponsible and over-reactive. Their backgrounds, helicopter parents, drugs, upbringing, and the belief that their happiness is a priority for the world to fulfill, seems to be indicating a rise in suicides and a shutting down of speech and the free exchange of ideas. Life is hard; it is a struggle, competition is fierce, and one is not rewarded for doing nothing as an adult in the real life. The young today, when they reach adulthood, do not seem to assume the responsibility of an adult. Their age does not determine their ability to think and act responsibly. They were raised to believe they were perfect, brilliant, and naturally successful, and they cannot abide by any other viewpoint. Unfortunately, not everyone is a winner; some will fail, and they will not have learned how to fail because they have not had to face that possibility before. They were brought up to believe that they had to do very little, other than to be present, in order to succeed.
Ellis lays bear the attitude of “victimhood” that is so prevalent today. His language is sometimes crude, but his ideas are lucid. He grew up before the Aids epidemic and therefore was raised with the idea that sex was for pleasure and not something to be feared or vilified. Homosexuality was rarely discussed. In his time, sex education was provided by magazines like Playboy, accidentally discovered in a father’s stash. Cyber bullying did not exist because technology had not yet produced computers, smart phones or sites like Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat. In general, people seemed to express themselves more politely and not as viciously as they do today, hiding behind their anonymity sometimes since their user names do not identify them. This gives them the freedom to stay foolish and hurtful things without retaliation.
Today, the younger people do not understand mischief, comedy or the meaning of an apology. They simply vent their anger, without restraint, on any forum which gives them recognition. They use emotional appeal to prove their point even when their point is obviously without merit. Political parties have discovered the usefulness of that same mechanism and play on fear, shame and humiliation to make a point, rather than on the intellectual presentation of real information. There is no room for criticism or critical thinking. To Ellis, if you can’t cope with your life, you need to see a doctor, not to retire to a “safe room”. Blaming your neurosis on Trump, blaming your old pain on Trump is unrealistic and means you need help. He recommends seeking it. He refers to these victims, and I paraphrase, as “social justice warriors expressing high moral outrage”, often unjustly. He believes they need to see a doctor to solve their problems and should stop running from them and falsely blaming others.
Ellis analyzes the Trump victory and white privilege by highlighting people like Tom Cruise, Basquiat, Meryl Streep and a host of other well-known personages, to make his points. They are referenced and authentic. Liberals have become authoritarian and childish, yet they point their finger at others accusing them of doing what they are doing, sometimes to an even greater degree. They are in denial and cannot accept the results of the last election. Ellis claims no political affiliation, however. He agrees with some ideas and disagrees with some ideas on both the left and the right. He did not vote, however, in the last Presidential election.
Personally, I think this book should be required reading, not for its literary value, but for its honest portrayal of people today. Maybe the loudest mouths will look in the mirror and discover they are shouting out nonsensical, hypocritical ideas and complaints. Maybe they will learn how to listen to diverse opinions instead of demanding diversity while refusing to provide it to others. Somehow, I doubt this will happen. The politicians are self-serving, and this hateful atmosphere serves their needs. Hollywood simply wants to be relevant, in any way, even when their own behavior is antithetical to what they preach to others. The media will not praise a book that critiques them negatively and flies in the face of their ideology, one they are promoting instead of presenting the news and acting like a check and balance on government as “The Fourth Estate” should. ( )
1 ääni thewanderingjew | May 21, 2019 |
näyttää 5/5
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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"Combining personal reflection and social observation, Bret Easton Ellis's first work of nonfiction is an incendiary polemic about this young century's failings, e-driven and otherwise, and at once an example, definition, and defense of what 'freedom of speech' truly means. Bret Easton Ellis has wrestled with the double-edged sword of fame and notoriety for more than thirty years now, since Less Than Zero catapulted him into the limelight in 1985, earning him devoted fans and, perhaps, even fiercer enemies. An enigmatic figure who has always gone against the grain and refused categorization, he captured the depravity of the eighties with one of contemporary literature's most polarizing characters, American Psycho's iconic, terrifying Patrick Bateman. In recent years, his candor and gallows humor on both Twitter and his podcast have continued his legacy as someone determined to speak the truth, however painful it might be, and whom people accordingly either love or love to hate. He encounters various positions and voices controversial opinions, more often than not fighting the status quo. Now, in White, with the same originality displayed in his fiction, Ellis pours himself out onto the page and, in doing so, eviscerates the perceived good that the social-media age has wrought, starting with the dangerous cult of likeability. White is both a denunciation of censorship, particularly the self-inflicted sort committed in hopes of being 'accepted,' and a bracing view of a life devoted to authenticity. Provocative, incisive, funny, and surprisingly poignant, White reveals not only what is visible on the glittering, pristine surface but also the riotous truths that are hidden underneath"--

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