KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Little Eyes: A Novel – tekijä: Samanta…
Ladataan...

Little Eyes: A Novel (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2018; vuoden 2021 painos)

– tekijä: Samanta Schweblin (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
3051966,878 (3.63)14
LONGLISTED FOR THE 2020 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE "Her most unsettling work yet -- and her most realistic." --New York Times A visionary novel about our interconnected present, about the collision of horror and humanity, from a master of the spine-tingling tale. They've infiltrated homes in Hong Kong, shops in Vancouver, the streets of in Sierra Leone, town squares in Oaxaca, schools in Tel Aviv, bedrooms in Indiana. They're everywhere. They're here. They're us. They're not pets, or ghosts, or robots. They're real people, but how can a person living in Berlin walk freely through the living room of someone in Sydney? How can someone in Bangkok have breakfast with your children in Buenos Aires, without your knowing? Especially when these people are completely anonymous, unknown, unfindable. The characters in Samanta Schweblin's brilliant new novel, Little Eyes, reveal the beauty of connection between far-flung souls--but yet they also expose the ugly side of our increasingly linked world. Trusting strangers can lead to unexpected love, playful encounters, and marvelous adventure, butbut what happens when it can also pave the way for unimaginable terror? This is a story that is already happening; it's familiar and unsettling because it's our present and we're living it, we just don't know it yet. In this prophecy of a story, Schweblin creates a dark and complex world that's somehow so sensible, so recognizable, that once it's entered, no one can ever leave.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:srferrar
Teoksen nimi:Little Eyes: A Novel
Kirjailijat:Samanta Schweblin (Tekijä)
Info:Riverhead Books (2021), 256 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:kindle, kindle sale, not yet read, by a woman

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Little Eyes (tekijä: Samanta Schweblin) (2018)

Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 14 mainintaa

englanti (16)  espanja (1)  hollanti (1)  italia (1)  Kaikki kielet (19)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 19) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I need a kentuki!!!!

A kentuki is a robotic toy animal (stuffed animal...plushie...whatever you call them in your neck of the woods) with a camera inside.

You can either be the person who lives with the kentuki (the Keeper) or you can be the person who controls the kentuki remotely (the Dweller). I want to be the Dweller. I want to be the one who watches. It's kind of like a one-on-one reality TV.

The match up is completely random so you don't know where your kentuki is until the person it lives with wakes it up and you suddenly see this stranger and the inside of their house on your screen. Don't worry. They don't know who YOU are or WHERE you are unless you get yourself emotionally involved and TELL them.

Thanks to my friend Heidi for telling me about this great little book. Now, someone please invent a real kentuki and I will gladly hand over my $279.00. ( )
  Jinjer | Jul 19, 2021 |
Es war Thea Dorn, die in einer Sendung des "Literarischen Quartetts" so sehr von diesem Buch schwärmte, dass sie mich - neugierig geworden - dazu brachte, mir sofort das E-Book runterzuladen. Es war ein Samstagnachmittag. Und ich las bis spät in die Nacht, bis mir die Augen zufielen. Und am nächsten Morgen gleich weiter. Es war unmöglich, aufzuhören. Dann war es aus und ich verfluchte und liebte die Autorin zu gleichen Teilen. Verfluchen, weil sie an einem Punkt aufhörte, an dem doch noch nicht alle Fragen beantwortet blieben. "Ja aber was ist denn mit X, und was wurde aus Y" waren meine ersten Gedanken. Ich war schockverliebt in diese, etwas skurile kurze Geschichte, die voller teils ebenso skuriller und schräger, und doch oft liebenswerter Charaktere steckte. Und die von Kentukis handelte. Geräte, die aussehen wie Plüschtiere, die allerdings mit einer Kamera ausgestattet sind. Entweder man hat ein Kentuki, um in die fremde Welt eines anderen Menschen hineinzusehen. Kein Ton. Nur Bilder. Oder man hat ein Kentuki und erlaubt jemand anderem eben diesen Einblick. Diejenigen, die sich beobachten lassen, wissen nicht, wer am anderen Ende sitzt. Umgekehrt... nun, da gibt's möglicherweise Wege... Eine neue Form von Social Media Werkzeug, welches zwar derzeit (noch) nicht existiert, aber auch nicht als all zu ferne Utopie erscheint. Das Buch besteht aus mehreren Kapiteln, die ganz unterschiedliche Menschen in unterschiedlichen Ländern behandeln. Manchmal begegnen sie sich in den Kapiteln, manchmal nicht. Das Ende... es war offen... und es war perfekt, so wie es war! Ich war begeistert. Ich habe gelacht, geweint, mitgelitten. Was für ein zauberhaftes Buch! ( )
  Heidi64 | Jul 18, 2021 |
Samanta Schweblin is an Argentinian writer with a German name. I should look into that. Anyway, we've heard that people in the rest of the world can tell a novel from the USA because we always have a happy ending. This woman is definitely not from the USA. Little Eyes represents kentukis which are little mechanical creatures that can be controlled, inhabited by a person connected on the internet. There are Keepers who have these cute, animal shaped pets in their home, and Dwellers who inhabit the pets. So keepers voluntarily let strangers roll around and view their homes, and Dwellers get to experience places they never would have seen otherwise. If it sounds creepy, some of it is. Kentukis can bring out the hope and sweetness of a child and the sadism of a Keeper. They can be superheros or lonely voyeurs. The novel was longlisted for the Man Booker International Prize and is worth a read, even while it makes you itchy. ( )
  Citizenjoyce | Jul 18, 2021 |


'Little Eyes' is as is a powerful and disturbing book that invites us to reflect on how a new technology can amplify our desires and our fears and create opportunities for both kindness and abuse.

At the beginning of the book, Schweblin perfectly captures the way big tech uses a 'supply creates its own demand' approach to new products. They put the product in smart white boxes, which are almost works of art. The add a high price so you know the box contains something valuable. You don't know what it's for or how it works but you love the smart design of the box and you want to hold the product and find out what it does. You live with the constraints big tech places on the product/service and may even convince yourself that the constraints are features that you need to learn how to use. You do all this because you want to leap into a dream where the technology will make you... MORE.

The communications product is called a Kentuki. The technology itself is not innovative. It's a cellphone on wheels dressed up as a fluffy animal. Kentuki don't compete with or replace existing products. Kentuki are marketed to create a desire for Kentuki. They designed to create a desire that only a Kentuki can fulfil.

The heart of the innovation and the heart of the novel lies in the two user roles Kentuki create: Keeper and Dweller. A Keeper shares their home with the Kentuki and lets it charge itself. A Dweller moves the Kentuki around and uses its camera, microphone and translator app to observe the Dweller and their home.

A purchaser can choose to be a Keeper of Dweller but Keepers and Dwellers can't choose each other. A blind automated irreversible process connects a Keeper with a Dweller as soon as the Kentuki is activated. It provides neither with information about the other. The Dweller can see and hear the Keeper but cannot speak. The Keeper sees only the Kentuki. The Keeper must inevitably surrender some anonymity in exchange for intimacy. The Dweller need only trade time and attention to become part of the Keeper's household.

The book describes Kentuki technology clearly and plausibly but its main focus is on the motivations and reactions of the Keepers and Dwellers: what prompts someone to choose to be a Dweller or a Keeper and what drives the boundaries of the freedom each is trying to get or willing to give up.

By amplifying two features on our day-to-day online lives: the pull of voyeurism and the behavioural changes enabled or triggered by anonymity, the Kentuki concept explores some dark places in our desires and fears.

After a brutal and disturbing first chapter that shows how quickly the Keeper/Dweller relationship can be abused. the novel follows the experiences of five people using Kentuki.

A Keeper in Oaxaca who is emotionally distant from and becalmed in her own life, who buys a Kentuki to ward off boredom and the jealousy that accompanies it. She starts off protecting herself from her Kentuki and then becomes hostile to it.

A divorced father in Umbertide who becomes the de facto Keeper of his son's Kentuki. He is a man seeking a connection and who is blinded by his own trust and his embarrassment at his need and its rejection and ends up betrayed.

A young boy in Antigua who becomes a Dweller who wants no keeper at all, only the freedom to run away.

An old woman living alone in Lima who is gifted the role of Dweller by her absent son. She starts with no agenda but becomes lost in her desire to protect and to be needed.

A young man in Zagreb who is trading dwelling rights who wants only to exploit a gap between new technology and its regulation but finds he cannot keep his distance from what he sees through the windows on the world the Kentuki make him look through.

The five stories are told in parallel, moving through synchronised arcs from expectation to realisation. In each case, we see that, regardless of whether the person on the other side of the Kentuki link is strong or weak, nasty or nice, it is the fears and desires of the people whose stories we are following that end up defeating them.

I admired Schweblin's refusal to explain or to judge the people in her stories. She makes her readers into observers and lets us come to our own conclusions.

'Little Eyes' is filled with abuse, sadness, disappointment and anger. It's not a fun read or an uplifting one. It's grim and often disturbing but deeply memorable. ( )
2 ääni MikeFinnFiction | Mar 15, 2021 |
Argentinian author Samanta Schweblin is often lauded as one of the best contemporary authors of literary horror. I confess that I have neither read Fever Dream nor her short-story collection Mouthful of Birds. So I was excited at the opportunity of reviewing her latest novel – Little Eyes, particularly after Megan McDowell’s English translation made it to the longlist of the Man Booker International Prize.

Little Eyes is the literary equivalent of a musical “concept album” whose different songs are linked by a one overarching subject. In this case, the “concept” is that of the “kentukis”. (Incidentally, “Kentukis” is the title of the original, Spanish-language version of the novel).

Schweblin describes kentukis as small soft-toy-like robots which move on wheels, quite similar to the ‘interactive pets’ which actually exist and are popular with younger children. The fictional “kentukis”, however, have a defining characteristic – they are remotely operated by anonymous, untraceable users or “dwellers” who connect to and control the robots via an internet connection. Cameras installed in the gadget’s “little eyes” allow the dwellers to watch the kentuki’s surroundings. Buying a kentuki, therefore, is tantamount to letting a stranger into your home, whilst buying a connection literally provides you with an insight into a different life.

As the book progresses, we learn more about the way the robots operate. It’s immediately evident, for instance, that the gadgets cannot speak and can only make ‘pet noises’. Their batteries need to be charged regularly, and they are a single-use product – if the battery falls flat, or if the “dweller” unilaterally decides to terminate the connection, a kentuki will no longer work and its owner or “keeper” can do nothing to revive it.

Schweblin’s novel is made up of several distinct stories, all of which feature a keeper, a dweller or both. Some of the stories consist of a self-contained chapter. Others are spread out over several recurring chapters: an old woman in Lima who becomes the dweller of a kentuki in Erfurt and develops maternal, protective feelings towards the robot’s owner; an Italian man buys a kentuki for his son at the insistence of his ex-wife, with sinister consequences; a young boy in Antigua discovers that he is controlling a kentuki in Norway and dreams of “virtually” touching the snow. There are other tales which range from the scary, to the harrowing, to the unexpectedly moving. Indeed, the premise of the book presents several interesting possibilities. It also feels very plausible – the technology allowing such gadgets does exist and we are already used to the idea of social media making “exhibitionists” of some whilst turning others into “voyeurs”.

The book is engrossing, the translation by Megan McDowell smooth and highly readable. And yet, this novel didn’t fully satisfy me. Perhaps the problem is that it starts with one of its strongest chapters. Three teenage girls strip for their kentuki, then try to make it communicate with them by asking it to trace out words on the letters of a Ouija board. They realise to their dismay that the anonymous ‘dweller’ of their innocent-looking pet is a pervert and a blackmailer. In a few hard-hitting pages Schweblin creates an atmosphere of fear and unease. The contrast between the Ouija board (suggesting traditional supernatural horror) and the kentuki (a state-of-the-art technological device) is brilliant, implying that conventional horror tropes will be given a contemporary twist. This chilling start creates expectations that are never fully realised. The different stories, interesting as they are, reach their endings without really gelling with each other. I certainly enjoyed the ride, but anticipated a more impressive destination.

https://endsoftheword.blogspot.com/2020/04/little-eyes-by-samanta-schweblin.html ( )
1 ääni JosephCamilleri | Mar 5, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 19) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (1 mahdollinen)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Samanta Schweblinensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetlaskettu
McDowell, MeganKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Before starting the engine, make sure the others are clear of the danger areas.
—JCB Backhoe Loader safety manual, 2016

Will you tell us about the other worlds out among the stars—the other kinds of men, the other lives?
—Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
The first thing they did was show their tits.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

LONGLISTED FOR THE 2020 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE "Her most unsettling work yet -- and her most realistic." --New York Times A visionary novel about our interconnected present, about the collision of horror and humanity, from a master of the spine-tingling tale. They've infiltrated homes in Hong Kong, shops in Vancouver, the streets of in Sierra Leone, town squares in Oaxaca, schools in Tel Aviv, bedrooms in Indiana. They're everywhere. They're here. They're us. They're not pets, or ghosts, or robots. They're real people, but how can a person living in Berlin walk freely through the living room of someone in Sydney? How can someone in Bangkok have breakfast with your children in Buenos Aires, without your knowing? Especially when these people are completely anonymous, unknown, unfindable. The characters in Samanta Schweblin's brilliant new novel, Little Eyes, reveal the beauty of connection between far-flung souls--but yet they also expose the ugly side of our increasingly linked world. Trusting strangers can lead to unexpected love, playful encounters, and marvelous adventure, butbut what happens when it can also pave the way for unimaginable terror? This is a story that is already happening; it's familiar and unsettling because it's our present and we're living it, we just don't know it yet. In this prophecy of a story, Schweblin creates a dark and complex world that's somehow so sensible, so recognizable, that once it's entered, no one can ever leave.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.63)
0.5 1
1 2
1.5
2 4
2.5 3
3 9
3.5 8
4 23
4.5 3
5 10

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 162,191,300 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä