KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Under the Glacier – tekijä: Halldor…
Ladataan...

Under the Glacier (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1968; vuoden 2005 painos)

– tekijä: Halldor Laxness (Tekijä), Magnus Magnusson (Kääntäjä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
5192034,729 (3.67)63
Nobel laureate Halldór Laxness’s Under the Glacier is a one-of-a-kind masterpiece, a wryly provocative novel at once earthy and otherworldly. At its outset, the Bishop of Iceland dispatches a young emissary to investigate certain charges against the pastor at Sn?fells Glacier, who, among other things, appears to have given up burying the dead. But once he arrives, the emissary finds that this dereliction counts only as a mild eccentricity in a community that regards itself as the center of the world and where Creation itself is a work in progress. What is the emissary to make, for example, of the boarded-up church? What about the mysterious building that has sprung up alongside it? Or the fact that Pastor Primus spends most of his time shoeing horses? Or that his wife, Ua (pronounced “ooh-a,” which is what men invariably sputter upon seeing her), is rumored never to have bathed, eaten, or slept? Piling improbability on top of improbability, Under the Glacier overflows with comedy both wild and deadpan as it conjures a phantasmagoria as beguiling as it is profound.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:nick4998
Teoksen nimi:Under the Glacier
Kirjailijat:Halldor Laxness (Tekijä)
Muut tekijät:Magnus Magnusson (Kääntäjä)
Info:Vintage (2005), 256 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:to-read

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Jäätikön jumalat (tekijä: Halldór Laxness) (1968)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatyksityinen kirjasto, MRMP, kares, Wuestenfuchs, nick4998, reenum, stillatim, Jimbob252a
PerintökirjastotIris Murdoch
  1. 10
    Matka Maan keskipisteeseen (tekijä: Jules Verne) (Tinwara)
    Tinwara: Under the glacier is in a way a direct reply to The journey to the centre of the earth; Laxness refers to Verne throughout the book. You would miss a dimension of Under the glacier if you haven't read Jules Verne!
  2. 10
    Fludd (tekijä: Hilary Mantel) (deb80)
    deb80: Similar plot and characters. The bishop is not amused. He sends an emissary to investigate a malfunctioning pastor, church and congregation, with wacky and wonderful results.
  3. 00
    Pets (tekijä: Bragi Ólafsson) (callmebalthazar)
    callmebalthazar: Iceland breeds some strange writers. Wonderfully strange.
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 63 mainintaa

englanti (17)  ranska (1)  hollanti (1)  saksa (1)  Kaikki kielet (20)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 20) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I like books about theology. I am fascinated by Halldor Laxness' life. Independent People is a masterpiece. Unfortunately, I have no stomach at all for anything that resembles magical realism, which of course this book does. Everything is so quirky! The final two chapters were quite good, but otherwise it reminded me a bit too much of At Swim Two Birds, i.e., I don't get the references at all, not because they're too erudite for me (I like not getting those references), but because I just don't care. That's probably not fair to Laxness' book, but that's the (unjustifiable) feeling I had. I'm looking forward to reading more of his work, since this is apparently an outlier. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
Een komische, filosofische en absurdistische roman over het leven. Ongekend hoge literaire kwaliteit ( )
  gerrit-anne | Apr 24, 2019 |
Under the glacier is a splendidly eccentric novel that doesn't fit into any particular pigeonhole, except perhaps for a generalised sixties feel of "anything goes". A naive young man is sent by his bishop to report on the state of the church community in a remote parish on the slopes of the famous Snæfellsjökull volcano in the far West of Iceland. Not coincidentally, the crater of Snæfellsjökull is where the explorers in Jules Verne's Journey to the centre of the Earth descended below ground. It is clearly a place conducive to all kinds of strangeness.

It turns out that the pastor supports himself mostly by shoeing horses and repairing primus stoves; that his wife - who may or may not be a mythical creature - has been missing for 35 years; that no services have been held in living memory and the church is nailed up, its fittings mostly used for firewood; that a mysterious wealthy outsider has had a bungalow built on part of the churchyard; and that there is at least a strong rumour that bodies have been buried in the glacier rather than in the cemetery.

Definitely all very odd, and you won't be much clearer about what is going on at the end than you were at the beginning, but great fun, and plenty to make you think about what we mean by religious belief and the nature of objective observation. In odd ways, it reminded me of Thomas Bernhard's first novel, Frost, published five years earlier - but Laxness is a lot less wordy than Bernhard! ( )
1 ääni thorold | Oct 28, 2017 |
Laxness's Under the Glacier ( Kristnihald undir Jökli, trans. Magnus Magnusson), is a tale of different kind of marvellousness than Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth which shares the setting of Snæfellsjökull. The narrator, an unnamed young man, is commissioned by the Bishop of Iceland to go to the village at Snæfellsjökull to examine the inhabitants and determine the state of Christianity in the village (Laxness's title is literally translated as Christianity at Glacier).

As Emissary of the Bishop (quickly shortened to Embi), he is to interview the locals, particularly the pastor Jon Primus, and simply bring back a report to the Bishop -- just the facts, no interpretations. So Embi finds himself in a village where the church is boarded up, staying at the pastor's house whose housekeeper only serves cakes, taping philosophical conversations with farmers, scrubwomen, a truck-driving poet, the pastor who sidelines as a locksmith and farrier, and an Australian engineer, originally from Iceland, who stole the pastor's wife Ua and is trying to set up a mystical colony.

And then there is the Glacier: It is often said of people with second sight that their soul leaves the body. That doesn't happen to the glacier. But the next time one looks at it, the body has left the glacier, and nothing remains except the soul clad in air.

It's a wondrous book -- mind-bending, hilarious, and a journey to the center of life. ( )
  janeajones | Jul 30, 2015 |
The other day, I was looking for something out of the ordinary to read and, on opening Susan Sontag’s collection “Reborn,” saw an essay on Haldor Laxness’ “Under the Glacier.” Not wanting to give away too much to myself, I read only the first couple of paragraphs, was intrigued enough to pick it up, and set the rest of the essay aside for later.

The novel tells the story of a nameless bishop’s emissary (he is referred to only as “Embi,” short for “emissary of the bishop”). Embi is sent to a distant part of Iceland to investigate the odd behavior of the people there. Among other things, the local pastor has given up burying the dead, the local church has been boarded up, and the views of the community have become decided less orthodox in nature. Much of the novel is simply a detailed record of Embi’s continuous confused frustrations at the behavior of the people. When Embi asks Pastor Jon about the importance of delivering sermons, he says, “Oh, no, better to be silent. That is what the glacier does. That is what the lilies of the field do.” Instead, Pastor Jon spends most of his time travelling around the village, shoeing horses and repairing old electric stoves.

During his face-finding mission, Embi happens across the truck-driving poet Jodinus Alfberg and his boss, the New Agey and oddly con man-like Godman Syngmann (note his name). Syngmann is leading a group of Hatha Yoga practitioners and acolytes from Ojai, California through Iceland on some sort of a mission to “find themselves” (that grating exhortation of the New Age). Syngmann, in his attempts to harness the hieratic powers of the universe, wishes to reanimate the dead. At one point, Embi meets the resurrected Ua (“ooh-a,” the sound that men make upon seeing her), who was once married to Pastor Jon before she died, or was possibly turned into a fish.

Despite its subject, “Under the Glacier” has the occasional humorous moment – but I didn’t find it the hilarious, profound novel that Susan Sontag claims that it is in her essay, or that several other reviews found it to be. This may speak to the time when it was published - 1968 – a momentous year for Europe, politically and culturally. It was also a chaotic time that you probably needed to live through in order to understand the immediacy of its importance. But my parents were in still learning algebra in 1968. I’m a child of the nineties – a world of mix tape cassettes, Carmen Sandiego, and giant cellphones. Revolution was the furthest thing from our minds.

Is this novel a rollicking attempt to poke fun at the American, and largely clueless, embrace of the Eastern religious traditions? Or maybe it’s just discontent with institutionalized Christianity? Or maybe my problem is that I’m looking for something it should be “about.” I ought to give “Against Interpretation” another look, since I seem to be retrogressing in regards to the advice it gives. ( )
  kant1066 | Nov 20, 2012 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 20) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (4 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Laxness, Halldórensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Năpristoc, CrenguţaKääntäjäpäätekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Detjen, KlausSuunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Kress, BrunoKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Magnus MagnussonKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Otten, MarcelKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sontag, SusanJälkisanatmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

Nobel laureate Halldór Laxness’s Under the Glacier is a one-of-a-kind masterpiece, a wryly provocative novel at once earthy and otherworldly. At its outset, the Bishop of Iceland dispatches a young emissary to investigate certain charges against the pastor at Sn?fells Glacier, who, among other things, appears to have given up burying the dead. But once he arrives, the emissary finds that this dereliction counts only as a mild eccentricity in a community that regards itself as the center of the world and where Creation itself is a work in progress. What is the emissary to make, for example, of the boarded-up church? What about the mysterious building that has sprung up alongside it? Or the fact that Pastor Primus spends most of his time shoeing horses? Or that his wife, Ua (pronounced “ooh-a,” which is what men invariably sputter upon seeing her), is rumored never to have bathed, eaten, or slept? Piling improbability on top of improbability, Under the Glacier overflows with comedy both wild and deadpan as it conjures a phantasmagoria as beguiling as it is profound.

No library descriptions found.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Pikalinkit

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.67)
0.5 1
1 2
1.5 1
2 8
2.5 1
3 32
3.5 15
4 39
4.5 7
5 23

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 157,247,846 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä