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Vox – tekijä: Christina Dalcher
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Vox (vuoden 2018 painos)

– tekijä: Christina Dalcher (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,0879414,304 (3.61)43
On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:sdonne01
Teoksen nimi:Vox
Kirjailijat:Christina Dalcher (Tekijä)
Info:Berkley (2018), 336 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:-

Work Information

Vox (tekijä: Christina Dalcher)

  1. 30
    Orjattaresi (tekijä: Margaret Atwood) (vwinsloe)
  2. 10
    Native Tongue (tekijä: Suzette Haden Elgin) (2wonderY)
    2wonderY: Women's right have been removed. They develop a private language. This is a minor classic.
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» Katso myös 43 mainintaa

englanti (92)  merirosvokieli (1)  saksa (1)  Kaikki kielet (94)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 94) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Vox is set in America, in what feels like the present, but a twisted present. Women and girls are forced to wear a bracelet that counts their words, giving them increasingly greater shocks depending how many words over one hundred they speak. It's a strange new America, with things "going back the old way" with women no longer working outside the home, and only being home taking care of the home and family, and men being in charge of money and business. Women are not even allowed to read or write. I read a few reviews of this before I read the book comparing this to how Drumpf would have liked to lead the nation, and the reviewers were dragging the book because of it. That last president we had was a fool and has ruined America, hopefully not for good. I think one of the reasons I DID like this book, and The Handmaid's Tale, on Hulu, is because both can be seen as cautionary tales to those right wingers that say the family is falling apart, and gay people shouldn't be allowed to be together, etc. I could actually see all the things in the book happening, scary as they may be. 5 stars ( )
  relorenz1064 | Nov 21, 2021 |
Gagging Women

Vox is such a good idea, such a powerful metaphor for keeping women in their place, for male dominance at any cost, that you wish a stronger writer had rendered the tale. Dalcher has done a decent, if pedestrian, job of telling the story. However, how she has structured the plot limits the new world in which women have been essentially removed from the day-to-day of society and crippled with a wristband that allows them just one hundred words per twenty-fours hours before shocking them into insensibility. Oh yes, very Pavlovian of the ruling males who impose radical right Christian pentecostal doctrine as the law of the land. This aspect of the novel is probably why blurb writers bring up comparisons to The Handmaid’s Tale. And therein is what many may find lacking in this novel, that it doesn’t really paint a full, horrifying, and enraging portrait of new society, something making The Handmaid’s Tale so satisfying.

Dr. Jean McClellan is a research linguist who before the change of regime and government in the U.S. was working on and near to finding a medical solution to Werniche (receptive) aphasia (loss of ability to turn thoughts into sensible speech). She’s the mother of four, the youngest a girl. Her husband is a physician working for the White House. Her oldest son, a high school student, gets sucked into the overarching movement now controlling the country, Pure, the inspiration of the chief counselor to the president, a man who spouts Christian doctrine while imposing his brand of restrictions on society. To her credit, Dalcher provides glimpses of the Pure new order, which many readers wish she had fleshed out and explored in more detail.

Instead of balancing plot and context, she launches full bore into a government scheme to silence women and others the Pure leaders hate, LGBTQs and pretty much anybody else who doesn’t toe the mark of Biblical family and societal structure distilled into pure repressiveness, even at the cost of a well functioning and growing social and commercial world. So, what readers have is McClellan and her band of researchers being enlisted forcibly into government research with the end result being nefarious. Along the way, she reunites with her lover, also a scientist, and discovers she’s pregnant with his child. Some may enjoy this excursion into romance on the side, while others will find it compounds the novel’s chasing around tediousness.

Most disappointing about the novel is that it could have been so much more. Not a bad read, but not essential if you are looking for novels about the repression and control of women by men, or religious dictatorships, or self-destructive societies. In that case, if you hadn’t already done so, you’ll want to read the grandma of this dystopian subgenre, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Gagging Women

Vox is such a good idea, such a powerful metaphor for keeping women in their place, for male dominance at any cost, that you wish a stronger writer had rendered the tale. Dalcher has done a decent, if pedestrian, job of telling the story. However, how she has structured the plot limits the new world in which women have been essentially removed from the day-to-day of society and crippled with a wristband that allows them just one hundred words per twenty-fours hours before shocking them into insensibility. Oh yes, very Pavlovian of the ruling males who impose radical right Christian pentecostal doctrine as the law of the land. This aspect of the novel is probably why blurb writers bring up comparisons to The Handmaid’s Tale. And therein is what many may find lacking in this novel, that it doesn’t really paint a full, horrifying, and enraging portrait of new society, something making The Handmaid’s Tale so satisfying.

Dr. Jean McClellan is a research linguist who before the change of regime and government in the U.S. was working on and near to finding a medical solution to Werniche (receptive) aphasia (loss of ability to turn thoughts into sensible speech). She’s the mother of four, the youngest a girl. Her husband is a physician working for the White House. Her oldest son, a high school student, gets sucked into the overarching movement now controlling the country, Pure, the inspiration of the chief counselor to the president, a man who spouts Christian doctrine while imposing his brand of restrictions on society. To her credit, Dalcher provides glimpses of the Pure new order, which many readers wish she had fleshed out and explored in more detail.

Instead of balancing plot and context, she launches full bore into a government scheme to silence women and others the Pure leaders hate, LGBTQs and pretty much anybody else who doesn’t toe the mark of Biblical family and societal structure distilled into pure repressiveness, even at the cost of a well functioning and growing social and commercial world. So, what readers have is McClellan and her band of researchers being enlisted forcibly into government research with the end result being nefarious. Along the way, she reunites with her lover, also a scientist, and discovers she’s pregnant with his child. Some may enjoy this excursion into romance on the side, while others will find it compounds the novel’s chasing around tediousness.

Most disappointing about the novel is that it could have been so much more. Not a bad read, but not essential if you are looking for novels about the repression and control of women by men, or religious dictatorships, or self-destructive societies. In that case, if you hadn’t already done so, you’ll want to read the grandma of this dystopian subgenre, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Received via NetGalley for review.

Dystopian novels featuring women (or minority groups) being oppressed by the religious right (or the neo-conservatives, or militant, or or or) are all the rage nowadays, especially since our current political climate makes them so poignant. Unfortunately, Vox is not the best example of the genre.

Dr. Jean McClellan is an upper middle class white women who specializes in aphasia (which, believe me, is important) living in a society where women are limited to only 100 words a day under threat of potentially lethal electric shock. When the president's brother suffers from an accidents that gives him aphasia, Dr. McClellan is recruited by the government to work on a cure. Leveraging this, she removes her's and her daughter's counters, freeing their words (so only about 1% of the book actually deals with the constraints that Jean, as a woman, faces on her language). Of course, she discovers that the oppressive government is planning on using her research for nefarious purposes.

My problem is not with the cliche plot; it is with the way the plot is executed. Everything is too coincidental and ends too simply. Aphasia has many different types, and the fact that Jean not only specializes in Wernicke's area aphasia, but that her mother has it and that the government is interested in it is a little too far-fetched. Their plan to weaponize it makes no sense - people with this type of aphasia can't communicate with anyone, which is their goal, but they also can't understand anyone, which presents a huge stumbling block in trying to control them! How can you get someone to do what you want if they can't understand what you want?

And Jean is one of the more annoying, basically useless protagonists I've encountered in a long time. She's a stereotypical white feminist: only concerned with herself and her family when they're directly affected (which, granted, is something she confronts as the novel goes on, but never enough to change). Every choice she makes is out of concern for herself, her daughter, or her unborn child who might be a daughter. While I understand that having a daughter in such a climate would be worrying and present different challenges that a son, Jean seems not to care about her sons at all. Leo and Sam (the twins) might not even have been characters for all the effect they had on the plot or on her. And clearly her parenting suffers for it - I appreciate that Dalcher tried to show how ordinary citizens can become radicalized in Steven, but if he had been raised to truly see women as equals (as Lorenzo and Del clearly had been, for example), he never would have been radicalized in the first place.

And while Jean is a doctor, she is never directly involved in the cure for aphasia or the cure for society. Lin and Lorenzo are shown doing all the practical research and discoveries, and Patrick is the one who deploys the bioweapon, Is it even her idea to dose the administration? Does she ever truly face any risk herself, aside from her adultery? Of course not. She would fold under the pressure.

Her relationship with Patrick is failing, and rather than working on it or understanding him, she mopes and moans, not even realizing he's working with the resistance. How is that something you miss, if you truly love and know the man you've married? Why would he keep this monumental secret from her if he trusted and loved her? Instead, she lusts after charming and Italian Lorenzo, risking everything to be with him. Rather than forcing Jean to make a choice, Dalcher instead has Patrick die heroically so that the path is clear for them to be together. The men behind the conspiracy to silence women (which, improbably, only takes a year [I think? The timeline is not very well laid out.]) are all killed, a new president takes over, Jean leaves the US and everything is fine again. Only about 10 pages, if that, are devoted to this conclusion, leaving the reader with, if not whiplash, a sense of incompleteness.

While Vox clearly draws inspiration from A Handmaid's Tale, it does so perhaps a little too freely. Read that classic instead. ( )
  Elna_McIntosh | Sep 29, 2021 |
This book is very similar to "The Handmaid's Tale", but is much better for me. The author created a very realistic atmosphere if those events. The story is very tense. I liked the main heroine but I was sorry about her husband. The most interesting character for me was Steven, her son. The author showed how easy it is to distort our children's views and how easy this distortion becomes something normal for them.

( )
  Diana_Hryniuk | Aug 28, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 94) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Subtlety is not a concern here, and the theme of “wake up!” is hammered home so vigorously that it can feel hectoring. “Not your fault,” a man says to Jean. “But it is,” she thinks. “My fault started two decades ago, the first time I didn’t vote … was too busy to go on [a march].” It’s of a piece with the preposterous setup, the payoff-heavy writing and the casual appropriation of some of humanity’s most heinous instruments of oppression – labour camps, electrified restraints – in the service of a thriller. If Dalcher wants to scare people into waking up, she would do better to send them back to the history books, rather than forward into an overblown, hastily imagined future.
 

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (11 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Dalcher, Christinaensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Whelan, JuliaKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
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Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
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Tärkeät paikat
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Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
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Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
In memory of Charlie Jones linguist, professor, friend.
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
If anyone told me I could bring down the president, and the Pure Movement, and that incompetent little shit Morgan LeBron in a week’s time, I wouldn’t believe them.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.

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Keskiarvo: (3.61)
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