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The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on…
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The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on Orality and Literacy from… (vuoden 1988 painos)

– tekijä: Eric A. Havelock (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
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When oral culture becomes literate, in what way does human consciousness itself change? And how does the new form of communication affect the content and meaning of texts? In this book, one of the most original and penetrating thinkers in Greek studies describes the transformation from orality to literacy in classical times and reflects upon its continued meaning for us today. "Fresh insights into the orality-literacy shift in human consciousness from one who has long been studying this shift in ancient Greece and has now brought his vast learning and reflections to bear on our own times. This book is for a wide audience and calls for thoroughly rethinking current views on language, thought, and society from classical scholarship through modern philosophy, anthropology, and poststructuralism."--Walter J. Ong "All in all, we have in this book the summary statement of one of the great pioneers in the study of oral and literate culture, fascinating in its scope and rewarding in its sophistication. As have his other works, this book will contribute mightily to curing the biases resulting from our own literacy."--J. Peter Denny, Canadian Journal of Linguistics "An extremely useful summary and extension of the revisionist thinking of Eric Havelock, whom most classicists and comparatists would rank among the premier classical scholars of the last three decades. . . . The book presents important (though controversial) ideas in. . . an available format."--Choice… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:tolaat-yaakov
Teoksen nimi:The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on Orality and Literacy from Antiquity to the Present
Kirjailijat:Eric A. Havelock (Tekijä)
Info:Yale University Press (1988), Edition: New edition, 154 pages
Kokoelmat:Philosophy, Oma kirjasto
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The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on Orality and Literacy from Antiquity to the Present (tekijä: Eric A. Havelock)

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Eric A. Havelock (03 de junio 1903 - 4 de abril de 1988) fue un experto en literatura y filosofía clásicas, de origen británico que pasó la mayor parte de su vida en Canadá y los Estados Unidos. Fue profesor en la Universidad de Toronto y fue muy activo en el medio académico del movimiento socialista de Canadá durante la década de 1930. En la década de 1960 y 1970, fue el presidente de los estudios clásicos, tanto en la Universidad de Harvard como en la de Yale.
Havelock rompió radicalmente con sus propios maestros y propuso un modelo totalmente nuevo para la comprensión del mundo clásico, basado en una marcada división entre la literatura de los siglos VI y V antes de Cristo, por un lado, y la del siglo IV por el otro. La mayor parte del trabajo de Havelock consiste en desarrollar una sola tesis: el pensamiento occidental nace gracias a un profundo cambio en la forma de organizar las ideas por parte de la mente humana al transformarse la filosofía griega, desde un punto inicial oral, a ser escrita y leída.
Entre sus obras fundamentales se destaca Prefacio a Platón, del año 1963, y La Musa aprende a escribir, del año 1986. ( )
  Belarmino | Nov 16, 2017 |
About 28 centuries ago, one of the most importance occurrences in what would eventually become Europe took place: the sudden evolution of the Phoenician syllabary into the full Greek alphabet we know today. Before this time, absolutely all information had to be transmitted orally: from contracts between parties to how to become a Greek citizen to knowledge of everything from your complex family genealogy to how to engage on the battlefield. Two scholars, Milman Parry and Albert Lord, together proposed an idea which would have allowed all pre-literate poets (like Homer) to improvise their poetry; it also gives a cohesive set of explanations concerning why Homeric poetry looks the way it does. Their thesis, later picked up by the likes of Walter Ong and Eric Havelock, is called the Parry-Lord thesis. “The Muse Learns to Write” is Havelock’s last major work and mostly a book-length meditation on the Parry-Lord thesis. It is also a summa which tries to recapitulate an entire career’s worth of ideas while tying up loose ends. Because of this, its length – under 130 pages – it seem like a short, precursory introduction into the idea of orality. It is far more complex than its length would initially lead you to assume.

Havelock, for many years a Sterling Professor of the classics at Yale, is interested not so much in the shape of Homeric poetry, but rather the forms that occurred in human consciousness that were caused by the shift from orality to literacy. Also, how does this important transition inflict itself also upon the texts themselves, deforming or reshaping their meaning and content?

Some questions are so important that they may be almost counted to be scandalous: “One of the difficulties of thinking about language is that you have to use language to think about it. A linguistic act has to be directed upon itself. Once written down, the act could be visualized and this visual this could be separated from the act of speaking and laid out in a kind of visual map. But what was the nature and significance of the speaking act itself? What has been its role in man’s history?” (Havelock, 34). According to Havelock, not even the emergence of Greek philosophy escaped the influence of the orality-literacy transition. He cites the unique character of Plato, whose denunciation of poetry as a form of rhetorical decadence marks a sharp break from his own written prose (a prose which, should be noted, is highly indicative of his own background as a dramatist). Since so much of philosophy was born of Plato’s dramatic dialogues involving Socrates, we have to ask ourselves whether even the most basic presuppositions of philosophy – ideas of freedom, individuality, and what it means to know could not have gone untransformed by the orality-literacy transition.

Havelock goes on to present both a general and specific theory of Greek orality, as well as looking at the work of people whose work is closely related to his own, like Marshall McLuhan and Harold McInnis. For a one-stop précis of Havelock’s work, this is a wonderful place to start. As I said above, this is a summa, so it touches on many ideas, especially the ones on the orality-literacy break, which is most fully set forward in his earlier and more scholarly book “Preface to Plato” (1963). ( )
  kant1066 | Mar 22, 2014 |
Un libro maravilloso, te transporta a siglos pasados donde la escritura, a parte de comenzar la historia, fue el encargado de abrirnos paso a la gran imaginación que se tenia para aprender! ( )
  Maloh42 | Aug 20, 2013 |
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä (5 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Eric A. Havelockensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetcalculated
Jonkheer, ChristienKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Kuilman, DingemanKannen suunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

When oral culture becomes literate, in what way does human consciousness itself change? And how does the new form of communication affect the content and meaning of texts? In this book, one of the most original and penetrating thinkers in Greek studies describes the transformation from orality to literacy in classical times and reflects upon its continued meaning for us today. "Fresh insights into the orality-literacy shift in human consciousness from one who has long been studying this shift in ancient Greece and has now brought his vast learning and reflections to bear on our own times. This book is for a wide audience and calls for thoroughly rethinking current views on language, thought, and society from classical scholarship through modern philosophy, anthropology, and poststructuralism."--Walter J. Ong "All in all, we have in this book the summary statement of one of the great pioneers in the study of oral and literate culture, fascinating in its scope and rewarding in its sophistication. As have his other works, this book will contribute mightily to curing the biases resulting from our own literacy."--J. Peter Denny, Canadian Journal of Linguistics "An extremely useful summary and extension of the revisionist thinking of Eric Havelock, whom most classicists and comparatists would rank among the premier classical scholars of the last three decades. . . . The book presents important (though controversial) ideas in. . . an available format."--Choice

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