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How to Think About the Great Ideas: From the…
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How to Think About the Great Ideas: From the Great Books of Western… (vuoden 2000 painos)

– tekijä: Mortimer J. Adler (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut
338457,735 (3.81)-
Time magazine called Mortimer J. Adler a "philosopher for everyman." In this guide to considering the big questions, Adler addresses the topics all men and women ponder in the course of life, such as "What is love?", "How do we decide the right thing to do?", and, "What does it mean to be good?" Drawing on his extensive knowledge of Western literature, history, and philosophy, the author considers what is meant by democracy, law, emotion, language, truth, and other abstract concepts in light of more than two millennia of Western civilization and discourse. Adler's essays offer a remarkable and contemplative distillation of the Great Ideas of Western Thought.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:AmyCHouck
Teoksen nimi:How to Think About the Great Ideas: From the Great Books of Western Civilization
Kirjailijat:Mortimer J. Adler (Tekijä)
Info:Open Court (2000), 530 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
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How to Think About the Great Ideas: From the Great Books of Western Civilization (tekijä: Mortimer J. Adler)

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näyttää 4/4
I have long wanted to read this book because some people hold it in high regard.

This is a philosophy book, and it looks like it will eventually come out to be anti-religion. So far it is dry and pedantic in an abstruse way. It is not enlightening or interesting, just pedantic. It is not worth finishing. ( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
Love the concept of this book. It achieves what it specifically stakes out to do - to get more people thinking. It's not meant to be an authoritative text on philosophy or the breat ideas. It just gives an introduction to these topics, enough background information to catalyze thinking. ( )
  yamiyoghurt | Jan 29, 2018 |
I liked the personal introduction to these fundamental ideas, although his outdated use of Man and his belief in God was a bit distracting. ( )
  yarkan | Oct 31, 2009 |
"Philosophy is everybody's business," according to Adler. He sought to prove his point in a Great Ideas television series broadcast in the San Francisco Bay area in 1953 and 1954. The programs were filmed, later transferred to videotape and audiotape, and finally transcribed on behalf of the Centre for the Study of the Great Ideas; it is those transcripts that are the basis for the discussions here.

Decades before Allan Bloom famously attacked multicultural education in The Closing of the American Mind (1988), there was Mortimer Adler. A university-trained philosopher, Adler (b. 1902) is the inventor of Great Books-driven college curricula; during the 1930s, he caused such a stir at the University of Chicago that the faculty members demanded his dismissal. Later (1953-1954), he starred in his own TV show, The Great Ideas--and it's that show that gives this book its structure. Composed of transcripts of 52 half-hour segments, the book showcases Adler's ideas about all the big categories--truth, beauty, freedom, love, sex, art, justice, rationality, humankind's nature, Darwinism, government. In each chapter ("How to Think about God," "How to Read a Book," etc.), readers encounter Adler's philosophical instructions and opinions: he argues that the goal of both prison sentences and spankings should be to avenge, to reform and to deter others; he suggests that beauty is not just in the eye of the beholder; and--no surprise here--he confesses that he favours "the ancient and traditional meaning of art." Adler even takes up the subject of whether (and how) TV can be an effective educational tool. In the end, whether or not you agree with Adler, there's no question that the ideas he presents in these chapters are important. After all, they outlined the terms of a series of cultural and intellectual debates we're still having today--about art, curriculum and freedom.

Adler addresses a wide range of philosophical subjects, from epistemology to evolution, from art and work to law and government, sex, love, and friendship, progress and change, good and evil, war and peace, truth and beauty. In some programs, Adler advances his discussion alone; in others, questions from associate Lloyd Luckman give the reader (or TV audience) a surrogate with whom to identify.
  antimuzak | Aug 31, 2007 |
näyttää 4/4
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

Time magazine called Mortimer J. Adler a "philosopher for everyman." In this guide to considering the big questions, Adler addresses the topics all men and women ponder in the course of life, such as "What is love?", "How do we decide the right thing to do?", and, "What does it mean to be good?" Drawing on his extensive knowledge of Western literature, history, and philosophy, the author considers what is meant by democracy, law, emotion, language, truth, and other abstract concepts in light of more than two millennia of Western civilization and discourse. Adler's essays offer a remarkable and contemplative distillation of the Great Ideas of Western Thought.

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