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Devotions : the selected poems of Mary…
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Devotions : the selected poems of Mary Oliver (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2017; vuoden 2017 painos)

– tekijä: Mary Oliver

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
501737,507 (4.43)40
"Throughout her celebrated career, Mary Oliver has touched countless readers with her brilliantly crafted verse, expounding on her love for the physical world and the powerful bonds between all living things. Identified as "far and away, this country's best selling poet" by Dwight Garner, she now returns with a stunning and definitive collection of her writing from the last fifty years. Carefully curated, these 200 plus poems feature Oliver's work from her very first book of poetry, No Voyage and Other Poems, published in 1963 at the age of 28, through her most recent collection, Felicity, published in 2015."--… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:jennamozingo
Teoksen nimi:Devotions : the selected poems of Mary Oliver
Kirjailijat:Mary Oliver
Info:New York : Penguin Press, 2017.
Kokoelmat:Suosikit
Arvio (tähdet):****1/2
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Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver (tekijä: Mary Oliver) (2017)

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englanti (6)  saksa (1)  Kaikki kielet (7)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 7) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Apparently starting January 21 I started reading 1 poem in the morning and one before bed every day. I might do it again, since it's been basically part of my life for half a year, and different parts of the book remind me of different things that happened to me this year. I'm honestly really sad finishing this and I expect I'll feel kinda aimless for the next few days without quiet moments of reflection with Mary every day, her wisdom really has guided me!

It feels weird to give a review to a book that I sort of engaged with different like in a meditative way instead of just reading it straight through, so I guess I'll stick to the facts. This book organizes previously published material by book, reverse-chronologically, which was kind of a weird decision, though I appreciated getting to see how her work changes over time. I liked the older poems more than the newer, because the new ones talk about religion a lot and I can't really relate to that as much as I can the more spiritual naturey poems. Anyway, finishing this book seems like saying bye to an old friend and I'm kind of depressed about it but I'd definitely recommend y'all try this too, it honestly really improved my mental health to spend each morning in a moment of meditation ( )
  jooniper | Sep 10, 2021 |
“Listen, are you breathing just a little, and calling it a life? / While the soul, after all, is only a window, / and the opening of the window no more difficult / than the wakening from a little sleep.” (Quotation from “Have you ever tried to enter the long black branches, pos. 2487)

Content
These more than two-hundred poems are a personal selection of her poems, selected by Mary Oliver herself. She begins with her latest collection, Felicity, 2015, followed by Blue Horses 2014, Dog Songs, 2013, A Thousand Mornings 2012, Swan, 2010, Evidence, 2009, The Truro Bear and Other Adventures, 2008, Red Bird, 2008, Thirst, 2006, New and Selected Poems, Volume Two, 2005, Blue Iris, 2004, Why I wake Early, 2004, Long Life, 2004, Owls and Other Fantasies, 2003, What do we know, 2002, The Leaf and the Cloud, 2000, West Wind, 1997, White Pine, 1994, New and Selected Poems: Volume One, 1992, House of Light, 1990, Dream Work, 1986, American Primitive, 1983, Three Rivers Poetry Journal, 1980, Twelve Moons, 1979, The River Styx, Ohio, 1972, and ends with her first poetry collection No Voyage and Other Poems, 1963 and 1965.

Theme and writing
These poems are moments of observations and thoughts about nature, rivers, even stones, sun, snow, roses; we meet animals like foxes, horses, birds, especially herons, and her beloved dogs in her Dog Songs. Just simple moments, calm afternoons, evenings, sunny mornings in a quiet special surrounding of the beautiful nature and the poet wants to share these special moments, thoughts and feelings with us. Every single poem wants to show us the beauty of our world, to protect it and just enjoy every day of our life and be grateful for it.

Conclusion
“The poem is not the world. / It isn’t the first page of the world. / But the poem wants to flower, like a flower. / It knows that much. (Quotation from “Flare” 8., pos. 2361) These poems by Mary Oliver flower and touch our mind and souls. ( )
  Circlestonesbooks | May 13, 2021 |
Summary: A selection of the poetry of Mary Oliver written between 1963 to 2015.

I have only discovered the poetry of Mary Oliver since her death in 2019. Isn’t that how it often has been with great writers? One of the ironies of this was that I lived in Oliver’s birthplace of Maple Heights, Ohio for nine years. How did I miss knowing of her for so long? She was even teaching at nearby Case Western Reserve during some of the time I lived there and it was during this time that she won the Pulitzer prize in 1984 for her collection American Primitive. I am glad at last to have found her, a writer roughly of my generation.

This collection is a good introduction to her work, a selection of her poetry written between 1963 and 2015 and published in 2017, a couple years before her passing. The book features over 200 of her poems arranged in reverse chronological order, most recent first. One of the most striking things one notices is that most of the poems are of sights on her daily walks near her home in Provincetown in New England. She writes of snakes and swans, of the pond near her home, of blueberries and violets, sunrises and sparrows. Her poetry is suffused with wonder at the simplest things, her sense of the oneness of all things and her desire to be one with them.

The transcendent is never far, sometimes in the Romantic awareness of the Ultimate in all things, sometimes in echoes of Christianity, writing of “Gethsemane” and Psalm 145. Her poem “Praying” (from Thirst, 2006) might do as well as anything to encapsulate the prayers of the “spiritual but not religious”:

It doesn't have to be
the blue iris, it could be
weeds in a vacant lot, or a few
small stones; just
pay attention, then patch

a few words together and don't try
to make them elaborate, this isn't
a contest but the doorway

into thanks, and a silence in which
another voice may speak.

The reference “into thanks” reflects another theme running through her work, a profound thankfulness for life, even in its transience. In the concluding lines of “Why I Wake Early” (2004) she writes, “Watch, now, how I start the day/in happiness, in kindness.”

One of the striking things evident in the arrangement of the poems is that her later poems are much shorter, and to me carry more meaning in fewer words. Another morning poem, “I Wake Close to Morning” (Felicity, 2015) opens this selection:

Why do people keep asking to see
God's identity papers
when the darkness opening into morning
is more than enough?
Certainly any god might turn away in disgust.
Think of Sheba approaching
the kingdom of Solomon
Do you think she had to ask,
"Is this the place?"

Perhaps it is the “simplicity on the other side of complexity” or perhaps the waning of life’s energies that both slows her steps and leads her to choose her words as she writes in “The Gift” when she states: “So, be slow if you must, but let/the heart still play its true part.”

It would be wrong to give the impression that all here is sweetness and light. She writes of loneliness, and disappointment, and of death. One of the few poems of social comment is on the death of Tecumseh, one of the native leaders who fought displacement from the Ohio lands. Yet the dominant note is the wonder of the world around her that makes me wonder as to how much I miss on daily walks. We see, but do we pay attention? Oliver’s poems suggest she lived a life of paying attention ( )
  BobonBooks | Apr 1, 2021 |
After I finished this hefty collection of the selected poems of Mary Oliver, I find my opinion of her work remains the same. Certainly, she writes impressively about the natural world, but her writings are far too religious for my mind. As an atheist of at least five decades, her constant mentions of god, of owing it all to god, and that god is in everything, leaves me cold and uninvolved. I’m one of those nonbelievers that gets put off by “god talk” very quickly—it’s just not a cult I belong to. I love and admire the natural world, but I don’t attribute its magnificence to any mythological beings.

I appreciate her writings about nature, but I always feel a certain distance from her expressions and style. Many times, her words seem to head toward either something too simple or sweet. And while there are beautiful lines here and there, and an occasional poem that works quite nicely, having so many of her poems pulled together in one place seems to reinforce that I just don’t hold her in such high esteem as many of my customers did in our bookstores.

It all goes to that simple line: You can’t please all the people all the time. ( )
  jphamilton | Feb 15, 2021 |
We covered Mary Oliver in an adult Sunday school session in honor of her death. All I knew of her was the name, and so I bought this particular volume since it's a "best of" compilation with the selections chosen by Oliver herself. While I'm not crazy about Oliver (after a while there's a certain "sameness" to her), the anthology does contain some quite good numbers; and, considering that this is a "best of" compilation assembled by the poet herself, this particular volume/edition is probably the best overall introduction to Mary Oliver. Hence 4**** ( )
  CurrerBell | Feb 15, 2019 |
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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"Throughout her celebrated career, Mary Oliver has touched countless readers with her brilliantly crafted verse, expounding on her love for the physical world and the powerful bonds between all living things. Identified as "far and away, this country's best selling poet" by Dwight Garner, she now returns with a stunning and definitive collection of her writing from the last fifty years. Carefully curated, these 200 plus poems feature Oliver's work from her very first book of poetry, No Voyage and Other Poems, published in 1963 at the age of 28, through her most recent collection, Felicity, published in 2015."--

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