KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

So You Want to Talk About Race – tekijä:…
Ladataan...

So You Want to Talk About Race (vuoden 2018 painos)

– tekijä: Ijeoma Oluo (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,458659,360 (4.48)58
"A current, constructive, and actionable exploration of today's racial landscape, offering straightforward clarity that readers of all races need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide. In So You Want to Talk About Race, Editor at Large of The Establishment, Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans. Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, and Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word.""--… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:UUCUC
Teoksen nimi:So You Want to Talk About Race
Kirjailijat:Ijeoma Oluo (Tekijä)
Info:Seal Press (2018), Edition: First Edition, 256 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:race, race relations, racism, anti-racism, intersectionality, racial justice

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

So You Want to Talk About Race (tekijä: Ijeoma Oluo)

Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 58 mainintaa

Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 65) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Oluo uses personal incidents to highlight the pervasive racism in society in a very approachable way. ( )
  bookwyrmm | May 18, 2021 |
Ijeoma Oluo has written a book that needs to be read. I don't think any one really and truly wants to talk about race: but we need to talk about it. We need to listen to voices like Ijeoma, no matter how difficult it is to hear. ( )
  illmunkeys | Apr 22, 2021 |
So You Want to Talk About Race, like Ta-Nehisi Coates's Between the World and Me, is part autobiographical and part an earnest and honest discussion about race in America today. But other than the autobiographical aspects, and their extreme popularity in book discussion groups and beyond, they are very different. Between the World and Me is something of a dreamy poem that perceives racism as America's Original Sin and indelible stain. Oluo, on the other hand, has written a practical guide, both for white and Black Americans, to help them discuss race with less fear and peril with the hope, if not the expectation, that perhaps White Supremacy can be dismantled, even if it takes generations, provided that talk leads to actions. She explains concepts such as white privilege and intersectionality and discusses topics such as police brutality and affirmative action. She draws from her own life's experiences so while there is practical advice, the book carries authority and weight that is deeply personal and not merely academic. And anyone reading the book can use it to reflect on their own attitudes, thoughts, perceptions, and encounters, whether online or in person, that may have been colored by the issue of race. Oluo correctly emphasizes that words alone are inadequate though. People can talk about race until the cows come home. What really matters, and will change things, is for people to take concrete actions to end racism and racial oppression. ( )
  OccassionalRead | Mar 27, 2021 |
Whenever I become overwhelmed in my personal life with the race problem, I try to read a book about racial issues to strengthen my intellectual and emotional strength to deal with this topic better. My choosing this book is a result of that. It addresses the race issue not from a theoretical angle but from a practical one, one borne out of life experiences.

In 17 chapters, Oluo addresses common questions about race, like “Is police brutality really about race?”, “What are microaggressions?”, or “Why are our students so angry?” In each chapter, she begins by explaining her perspective on the question with personal reflections. Then she brings forth ideas for action in bulleted format before concluding. The whole production reads like 17 blog posts masquerading as chapters. The tone is engaging – never pretentious nor didactic.

A particular strength lies in its applicability to the American political climate. Oluo studied political science in college, and she possesses much skill in translating talk into action. Though clearly liberal, she spends her words advocating for better relations among the races rather than just advocating for a party or an ideology. She wants real action for a better world, and she wants it now.

The main weakness of the book is that so much of it is based on the author’s personal experiences as an African American in Seattle, Washington. This limits its applicability. Oluo acknowledges this shortcoming in a chapter on the Asian-American experience. This book’s greatest strength lies in its practicality from experience, but such practicality is also its main limitation.

This book was first published in 2019 before the global pandemic and ensuing racial discord in America after George Floyd’s unnecessary death. Thus, it is in a prime position to address current concerns without being opportunistic. Those who follow American politics in the truest sense – how neighbors relate to one another – will benefit from reading her account. It focuses not on how to police one’s own talk but on how to really build a better world through our actions. As the world comes out of a pandemic, one can only hope that Olou’s work can bear much fruit. ( )
  scottjpearson | Mar 15, 2021 |
Running time: 51:45
  stlukeschurch | Mar 9, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 65) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

"A current, constructive, and actionable exploration of today's racial landscape, offering straightforward clarity that readers of all races need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide. In So You Want to Talk About Race, Editor at Large of The Establishment, Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans. Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, and Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word.""--

No library descriptions found.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Pikalinkit

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (4.48)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 20
3.5 4
4 83
4.5 18
5 163

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 158,870,501 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä