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Doughnut economics : seven ways to think…
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Doughnut economics : seven ways to think like a 21st century economist (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2017; vuoden 2017 painos)

– tekijä: Kate Raworth

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
4051347,834 (4.13)7
A Financial Times "Best Book of 2017: Economics" 800-CEO-Read "Best Business Book of 2017: Current Events & Public Affairs" Economics is the mother tongue of public policy. It dominates our decision-making for the future, guides multi-billion-dollar investments, and shapes our responses to climate change, inequality, and other environmental and social challenges that define our times. Pity then, or more like disaster, that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date yet are still taught in college courses worldwide and still used to address critical issues in government and business alike. That's why it is time, says renegade economist Kate Raworth, to revise our economic thinking for the 21st century. In Doughnut Economics, she sets out seven key ways to fundamentally reframe our understanding of what economics is and does. Along the way, she points out how we can break our addiction to growth; redesign money, finance, and business to be in service to peop≤ and create economies that are regenerative and distributive by design. Named after the now-iconic "doughnut" image that Raworth first drew to depict a sweet spot of human prosperity (an image that appealed to the Occupy Movement, the United Nations, eco-activists, and business leaders alike), Doughnut Economics offers a radically new compass for guiding global development, government policy, and corporate strategy, and sets new standards for what economic success looks like. Raworth handpicks the best emergent ideas--from ecological, behavioral, feminist, and institutional economics to complexity thinking and Earth-systems science--to address this question: How can we turn economies that need to grow, whether or not they make us thrive, into economies that make us thrive, whether or not they grow? Simple, playful, and eloquent, Doughnut Economics offers game-changing analysis and inspiration for a new generation of economic thinkers.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Helen_M_Hill
Teoksen nimi:Doughnut economics : seven ways to think like a 21st century economist
Kirjailijat:Kate Raworth
Info:White River Junction, Vermont : Chelsea Green Publishing, [2017]
Kokoelmat:Political Economy, Development Policy
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Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist (tekijä: Kate Raworth) (2017)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 10) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
shelved in HT Green Library - by Reception - Monograph Library (R)
  HT.LibraryBooks | Jul 21, 2021 |
"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them." ~ Albert Einstein
  LGCullens | Jun 1, 2021 |
The dismal science has a propensity to be tedious and uninteresting to anyone outside its narrow sphere. But its influence is wide and pervasive, the neo-liberal agenda has given us a society where there is now a vast chasm between the super-rich elite and the poor underclass and where the single-minded pursuit of profit is degrading the world that we live in and are totally dependent on. This system that favours a small political and financial elite who make decisions based on a narrow range of interests and desires and I think that you could argue that economic theory has remained just a theory. The economists at the London School of Economics were quite embarrassed when the Queen asked how they managed to totally miss the 2008 financial crash. This is a common occurrence, time and time again these events have not been predicted, let alone prevented and they have caused serious harm to economies large and small.

Is there a way of fixing it though?

Kate Raworth thinks that there is. In this radical new economic theory that she sets out in Doughnut Economics, she identifies seven elements where the present systems have failed and her proposals to overhaul the current thinking. Addressing the fundamental issues such as growth, GDP, rational economic man and distribution of wealth her new economic plan takes us away from the folly of equilibrium and the boom and bust that always follows.



The principle of the doughnut above is that the outer ring is the limits of our resources; we, after all, are just on one planet and haven't got another to use when we have ruined and used this one. The inner ring is what we all need to be able to survive as human beings, from the essentials of food, water and shelter to the elements that make us civilised like energy, education and justice. The band between these two lines is the space where we all can live comfortably. It is a simple and elegant model and the places where parts of this have been implemented, the benefits are there for all to see.

When the short-term interests of a small elite diverge from the from the long-term interests of society as a whole, it is as Jared Diamond says, a blueprint for trouble. Raworth has developed an excellent and sustainable model of economics that we really need to start moving towards to, to make the economic systems work once again for the good of humanity and the planet. It is well thought through, with clear reasons as to why the current system is failing for most of the world at the moment and a soundly robust new system. For me though, the only thing it was lacking is the how we are going to change to something like this, that is urgently needed. Budging those vested and deeply ingrained interests is going to involve a lot of pain. Overall a really good book with a positive message and maybe a chance to turn a work that thrives for all. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
shelved in Green Library
  HT.LibraryBooks | Jan 22, 2020 |
The following review is written from the perspective of my startup:

Regen Network as a 21st-Century Economy

In 2017, economist Kate Raworth published Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist. The core concept of the book—the doughnut—has quickly gained prominence—from UN circles to alternative economic communities—as a way to summarize the tensions surrounding what might have formerly been called “sustainable development.”

On the interior of the doughnut is a social foundation. This is composed of human rights and human needs, such as access to clean water, healthy food, political voice, gender equality, etc. On the exterior of the doughnut is the ecological ceiling—the carrying capacity of the earth and her biological systems to sustain civilization. This is composed of ecological limits, such as ocean acidification, climate change, and chemical pollution.

As you can see from all the red in the above illustration, we currently live in a very fat doughnut, which fails to meet the social floor and extends far beyond the ecological ceiling.

So how can we transition into that nice green ring? Raworth explores seven avenues in her book.

Regen Network just so happens to have been oriented around establishing stronger ecological limits since our founding (as our tagline “balance sheet for earth” might suggest). In reviewing Raworth’s septad I will also highlight the ways in which Regen Network works in these arenas.

I. Change the Goal: from GDP to the Doughnut
Regen Network has the aim of planetary regeneration, and the goal of building the livelihoods of farmers by compensating them for ecological land stewardship.

II. See the Big Picture: from self-contained market to embedded economy
All of the human sphere, including our markets and our economic, are nested within earth systems. By working to bring ecological health into economic calculus, Regen Network helps to bring about a shift to the embedded economy where there are no such thing as externalities.

III. Nurture Human Nature: from rational economic man to social adaptable humans
As a blockchain enterprise, Regen Network is founded on the ethic of decentralization. Decentralization puts faith in the agency and ingenuity of individuals and communities to self-organize, rather than thinking of people as cogs in a massive economic machine.

IV. Get Savvy with Systems: from mechanical equilibrium to dynamic complexity
Our name, Regen Network, was inspired by the concept of regeneration. The definition of regeneration has been formalized by the work of Carol Sanford in the school she calls living systems. Categorically, living systems are about dynamic complexity and are the antonym of mechanical equilibrium.

V. Design to Distribute: from “growth will even it up again” to distributive by design
Farming is both the most common and least paid vocation on earth. By focusing on farmer wellbeing, Regen Network aims to focus on the class that growth economics have left behind.

VI. Create to Regenerate: from “growth will clean it up again” to regenerative by design
To cite Sanford’s work again, regeneration emerges out of seven first principles (with definitions given in Regen’s context):

Whole: Regen Network works through the lens of bioregions and earth-as-superorganism.

Potential: what do ecosystems look like when fully thriving? What does it look like when communities and landscapes become an integrated whole?

Reciprocity: how do we cycle energy through biotic systems economic systems rather than working with linear models of accumulations/depletion?

Essence: what is at the core of a particular place, and how do we uplift and organize around it?

Nestedness: properties nest within bioregions and watersheds nest within continents and the planet.

Nodal: where are the epicenters of systems change? What attention in our economic systems, agricultural systems, and scientific systems will ripple out through entire domains?

Development: how can we build the capacity of land stewards to be more deeply in relationship with their land?

VII. Be Agnostic about Growth: from growth addicted to growth agnostic
To be frank, this is one area that the crypto space could take some more time to reflect. Standard crypto-economic models necessitate growth; Ethereum, Bitcoin, Cosmos, and Regen Network all currently have increasing supplies where network security hinges upon currency deflation driven by market cap expansion (the crypto-economic premises of this subject are beyond the scope of this post). That said, if the crypto space is good at anything, it is experimentation and iteration, and I anticipate some radically different token economic models coming online in coming years that work with demurrage and post-growth economics.

A Few Words on the Ecological Ceiling
In my view, the primary shortcoming of Raworth’s model is that it uses an anthropocentric ecological ceiling. The ecological ceiling is the threshold at which livings systems collapse. The problem with setting this as our limit is that it is deaf to the cries of countless others in the more-than-human sphere that are crushed on our path to that limit. Lots of species can go extinct, waterways polluted, and soils eroded before arriving at systems-collapse.

In other words, the ecological ceiling is utilitarian and instrumentalist; what utility does nature provide us with, and how can we maximize that utility up to the breaking point? This is a fundamentally violent approach divorced from a land ethic. Tree frogs, mosquitoes, and mangroves (even boulders) have their own lives and experiences which have inherent value.

The economy is a human-created sphere that operates within the human realm. How can we imbue the economy with consideration for the more-than-human world for its own sake? Do economic systems have the capacity to interact coherently with the sacred and numinous? These are some of the questions we’re exploring at Regen Network. ( )
  willszal | Dec 19, 2019 |
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A Financial Times "Best Book of 2017: Economics" 800-CEO-Read "Best Business Book of 2017: Current Events & Public Affairs" Economics is the mother tongue of public policy. It dominates our decision-making for the future, guides multi-billion-dollar investments, and shapes our responses to climate change, inequality, and other environmental and social challenges that define our times. Pity then, or more like disaster, that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date yet are still taught in college courses worldwide and still used to address critical issues in government and business alike. That's why it is time, says renegade economist Kate Raworth, to revise our economic thinking for the 21st century. In Doughnut Economics, she sets out seven key ways to fundamentally reframe our understanding of what economics is and does. Along the way, she points out how we can break our addiction to growth; redesign money, finance, and business to be in service to peop≤ and create economies that are regenerative and distributive by design. Named after the now-iconic "doughnut" image that Raworth first drew to depict a sweet spot of human prosperity (an image that appealed to the Occupy Movement, the United Nations, eco-activists, and business leaders alike), Doughnut Economics offers a radically new compass for guiding global development, government policy, and corporate strategy, and sets new standards for what economic success looks like. Raworth handpicks the best emergent ideas--from ecological, behavioral, feminist, and institutional economics to complexity thinking and Earth-systems science--to address this question: How can we turn economies that need to grow, whether or not they make us thrive, into economies that make us thrive, whether or not they grow? Simple, playful, and eloquent, Doughnut Economics offers game-changing analysis and inspiration for a new generation of economic thinkers.

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