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Killers of the Flower Moon : the Osage…
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Killers of the Flower Moon : the Osage murders and the birth of the FBI (vuoden 2016 painos)

– tekijä: David Grann

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
3,0661963,236 (4.07)255
Presents a true account of the early twentieth-century murders of dozens of wealthy Osage and law-enforcement officials, citing the contributions and missteps of a fledgling FBI that eventually uncovered one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J.P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the "Phantom Terror," roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:atlantaquakers
Teoksen nimi:Killers of the Flower Moon : the Osage murders and the birth of the FBI
Kirjailijat:David Grann
Info:New York : Doubleday, [2016]
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto, Race, Racism, and People of Color Collection
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:Federal Bureau of Investigation - History, Oklahoma - History, Native Americans - History

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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI (tekijä: David Grann)

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» Katso myös 255 mainintaa

englanti (194)  ranska (2)  Kaikki kielet (196)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 196) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I wanted to throw this book at a wall when I finished. Not bc it was bad, but bc of the sheer magnitude of racial injustice that dogs this country’s remembered and forgotten history. It shouldn’t be shocking, but I’m not deadened to it yet. Smoothly written and rigorously researched, this was a gripping account of how whites tyrannized the oil rich Osage Natives with murder and graft in the early 1900s. Expertly investigates rule of law’s limitations, and sheds much needed modern light on this horrific homicidal exploitation of indigenous people. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
An account of the Osage murders of the 1910s–1930s and a federal investigation into several of the murders.

The book is presented in a dramatized narrative style similar to a true crime novel or murder mystery, mixing quotes and information from historical sources with fictional details of the characters' inner thoughts and feelings. I disliked this presentation as the fictional elements were a distraction from the historical material and felt like unnecessary padding. The author's efforts to build characters and generate intrigue and drama tended to be irritating rather than engaging, and led to a rather meandering structure for the book.

The last section of the book switches to a first-person memoir of the author's research into other unsolved murders or suspicious deaths of Osage people from the time period. There didn't seem to be enough information available to draw any definite conclusions, but the author offered various speculations and conjectures about who may have been responsible for the deaths. This part of the book felt disjointed and unfinished, as if it was composed of leftover material that didn't fit into the book's main "story", so the author simply tacked it on at the end.

To sum up, while the book's dramatized style may make it more accessible to general readers, I personally didn't care for it. ( )
  gcthomas | Apr 1, 2021 |
The author David Grann is a decent writer, gifted even, for being able to sift through mounds of research and archival material to complete Killers of the Flower Moon. This work is the product of something that doesn't exist any longer in the world--investigative journalism. I wish it did. Nowadays the closest you can get is historical revisionism, sadly. This book shows readers how much fun investigative journalism is in uncovering historical injustices that went unexamined while they were happening for various reasons. In the case of Killers, it was a criminal collusion over generations aided by the Federal Government's action to establish the Bureau of Indian Affairs and to force the Osage tribe members to live under financial guardianships to corrupt people and their conspirators.

Although the book begins by seemingly being a historical description of the Osage tribe and the Oklahoma Native Americans the author turns the tale into a who-done-it. This is a disingenuous change of narrative but very monetarily profitable as true crime podcasts were wildly popular during the pandemic lockdowns. The who-done-it angle lets Grann interlock several other interesting threads: J Edgar Hoover's early days in the FBI, oilmen as speculators, the failure of local police forces as work in a systematic and objective manner without the corrupting influences of politicians and thugs. Overall this is a sad tale of the plundering of the Oklahoma Native Americans who found themselves living over vast oil deposits which made their reservation enormously valuable for a time. The story has good guys and bad guys which is nicely developed. I hear this is already being made into a film. This book is a nice introduction to Hoover (not Herbert), the necessity of honest police forces, and to the waffling of the Federal Government of the sanctity of Indian Reservations. Those interested in recent American History will enjoy this sad tale of tragedy being visited upon the Osage for financially crass and racist motives.

No index, Notes, Bibliography, B&W Photos. ( )
1 ääni sacredheart25 | Mar 25, 2021 |
This book is the true story of a conspiracy to kill rich Indians. According to historians, the Osage Reign of Terror lasted from about 1921 to 1926. David Grann and others believe that the systematic murdering of the Osage lasted much longer, perhaps from 1918 to 1931 or beyond. The Osage had been driven from their land in Kansas to Oklahoma in the 1870s. When oil was discovered on the seemingly worthless Oklahoma land, many Osage became wealthy. Since they had been granted headrights to tracts of land upon which oil could now be extracted, white people went through extraordinary means to murder the Osage, obtain their headrights, and hijack their wealth.

The first part of the book focuses on Mollie Burkhart, a registered member of the Osage tribe. She is married to a white man, Ernest. Like other wealthy Osage, Mollie was required to have a financial guardian since the American government treated Indians like children; the whites didn't think they could and didn’t want them to manage money. So, they were considered wards of the government and assigned guardians. Ernest is Mollie’s guardian. Throughout the story, we learn that many of the guardians have ulterior motives, are dishonest, and use their positions to steal from their wards and profit from their roles.

When Mollie’s sister Anna is brutally murdered, the reader meets a cast of characters who are supposed to investigate and protect the family from further tragedy. Instead, another sister is killed when her house is bombed, There is one murder after another, and it becomes apparent that the county and state officials are corrupt. It is years before the unscrupulous methods of gathering evidence and conducting investigations are noticed.

William Hale, Ernest’s uncle, is seemingly the paragon of law and order. It seems that he is a supporter of the Osage and intends to protect their rights. However, as federal officials finally investigate the murders, it becomes apparent that he is involved in multi-layered schemes of duplicitous behavior designed to appropriate money from the Osage tribe members.

During the years of this story, the FBI is in the early stages of development. Criminal activity detection is beginning to become reliant on emerging technologies such as handwriting and document analysis, wiretapping, and fingerprints. J Edgar Hoover, the first director of the FBI figures prominent in this book, and a man named Tom White, who worked for Hoover, becomes a hero figuring out the atrocities during the Osage Reign of Terror.

It was horrifying to read of the massive crimes committed against the Osage. It was incredible how many people were poisoned, shot, or killed in other ways. Additionally, the author describes corrupt banking and lending businesses. Tom White found instances where they were expected to pay 10 to 50 percent interest rates. Life insurance policies with bogus heirs were designed to embezzle money from Osage. When accused of crimes or in need of legal advice, they were faced with ridiculous legal fees designed to steal their wealth. Rigged juries were commonplace, and undertakers, doctors, and police officers covered up horrendous crimes committed by white men. David Gran successfully depicts, with much documentation, the systematic exploitation of the Osage. It was an eye-opening and disturbing read.

https://quipsandquotes.net/?p=450&preview=true ( )
  LindaLoretz | Mar 15, 2021 |
This book is about the Osage murders. Oil was found on the Osage land. They became beyond wealthy. A big conspiracy to take their wealth away from them came in to play. They were appointed guardians and then murdered. The book does a good job of trying to figure out the tangled web. It's very interesting and majorly tragic. ( )
  ToniFGMAMTC | Feb 17, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 196) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
De maand van de bloemendoder is een fascinerend en tegelijkertijd gruwelijk boek over de moordpartijen, discriminatie en uitbuiting van Osage indianen aan het begin van de 20e eeuw in Oklahoma. Nadat de Osage, zoals zoveel indianen in de Verenigde Staten, waren verjaagd naar een reservaat in Oklahoma, bleek hier olie gevonden te worden. Hierdoor werden de Osage opeens rijk. Echter dit betekende ook uitbuiting, discriminatie en vele moordpartijen. David Grann is jarenlang bezig geweest met onderzoek naar misstanden die plaatsvonden en De maand van de bloemendoder is het zeer boeiende eindresultaat hiervan...lees verder >
 

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Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
David Grannensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetcalculated
Campbell, DannyKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Carella, MariaSuunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Dedekind, HenningKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Fontana, JohnKannen suunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Gay, CyrilTraductionmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Lee, Anne MarieKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Patton, WillKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Strömberg, RagnarKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Ward, Jeffrey L.Cartographermuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
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There had been no evil to mar that propitious night, because she had listened; there had been no voice of evil; no screech owl had quaveringly disturbed the stillness. She knew this because she had listened all night.
--John Joseph Mathews, Sundown
A conspiracy is everything that ordinary life is not. It's the inside game, cold, sure, undistracted, forever closed off to us. We are the flawed ones, the innocents, trying to make some rough sense of the daily jostle. Conspirators have a logic and a daring beyond our reach. All conspiracies are the same taut story of men who find coherence in some criminal act.  ---Don DeLillo, Libra
We have a few mouth-to-mouth tales; we exhume from old trunks and boxes and drawers letters without salutation or signature, in which men and women who once lived and breathed are now merely initials or nicknames out of some now incomprehensible affection which sound to us like Sanskrit or Chocktaw; we see dimly people, the people in whose living blood and seed we ourselves lay dormant and waiting, in this shadowy attenuation of time possessing now heroic proportions performing their acts of simple passion and simple violence, impervious to time and inexplicable. ---William Faulker, Absalom, Absalom!
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For my mom and dad
Ensimmäiset sanat
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In April, millions of tiny flowers spread over the blackjack hills and vast prairies in the Osage territory of Oklahoma.
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Page 141
Perhaps because he witnessed this—and other executions—or perhaps because he had seen the effect of the ordeal on his father, or perhaps because he feared the system could doom an innocent man, Tom grew to oppose what was then sometimes called “judicial homicide.” And he came to see the law as a struggle to subdue the violent passions not only in others but also in oneself.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

Presents a true account of the early twentieth-century murders of dozens of wealthy Osage and law-enforcement officials, citing the contributions and missteps of a fledgling FBI that eventually uncovered one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J.P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the "Phantom Terror," roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.

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