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The Quantum Handshake: Entanglement,…
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The Quantum Handshake: Entanglement, Nonlocality and Transactions (vuoden 2016 painos)

– tekijä: John G. Cramer (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut
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This book shines bright light into the dim recesses of quantum theory, where the mysteries of entanglement, nonlocality, and wave collapse have motivated some to conjure up multiple universes, and others to adopt a "shut up and calculate" mentality. After an extensive and accessible introduction to quantum mechanics and its history, the author turns attention to his transactional model. Using a quantum handshake between normal and time-reversed waves, this model provides a clear visual picture explaining the baffling experimental results that flow daily from the quantum physics laboratories of the world. To demonstrate its powerful simplicity, the transactional model is applied to a collection of counter-intuitive experiments and conceptual problems.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:CraigGrimm
Teoksen nimi:The Quantum Handshake: Entanglement, Nonlocality and Transactions
Kirjailijat:John G. Cramer (Tekijä)
Info:Springer (2016), Edition: 1st ed. 2016, 243 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
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The Quantum Handshake: Entanglement, Nonlocality and Transactions (tekijä: John G. Cramer)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatmreza101, CraigGrimm, Relmyna, erisdunn, Pauline_B, Psi617
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This book shines bright light into the dim recesses of quantum theory, where the mysteries of entanglement, nonlocality, and wave collapse have motivated some to conjure up multiple universes, and others to adopt a "shut up and calculate" mentality. After an extensive and accessible introduction to quantum mechanics and its history, the author turns attention to his transactional model. Using a quantum handshake between normal and time-reversed waves, this model provides a clear visual picture explaining the baffling experimental results that flow daily from the quantum physics laboratories of the world. To demonstrate its powerful simplicity, the transactional model is applied to a collection of counter-intuitive experiments and conceptual problems. ( )
  Pauline_B | Apr 1, 2018 |
John G. Cramer's book, "The Quantum Handshake," provides essential insights into how we might best interpret the mathematical equations of quantum physics. While the mathematical foundation of quantum physics is considered to be non-controversial and fundamentally sound, the interpretations of how and why quantum mechanics operates the way it does are bewilderingly numerous. Some of the most commonly discussed interpretations include: the orthodox Copenhagen Interpretation, several varieties of the Many Worlds Interpretation, the Holographic Interpretation, and John G. Cramer's Transactional Interpretation.

The long-standing philosophical conundrum associated with quantum physics interpretations can be attributed to the difficulty of testing and verifying these interpretations. Put another way, while it is the job of the interpretations to describe the mathematical formalism of quantum physics, only the formalism--not the interpretations--makes experimentally testable predictions. And adding to the confusion, as John Cramer so eloquently points out, is that "The major failings of many would-be interpretations of quantum mechanics are: (1) they confuse a cause with its effects (example: the knowledge interpretation’s assumption that changes in knowledge cause the wave function to change); (2) they confuse the map with the territory (example: Kastner’s assumption in the Possibilist Transactional Interpretation that the wave function resides in the Hilbert-space map of correlations); and (3) they are designed to explain one particular problem while ignoring all others interpretational problems."

"The Quantum Handshake" makes a compelling case for a comprehensive quantum mechanics interpretation--the Transactional Interpretation--based on advanced/retarded wave handshakes in such a way that easily accounts for non-locality, and provides the tools for understanding the many seemingly counter-intuitive aspects of the quantum formalism and for visualizing nonlocal quantum processes. In addition to the Transactional Interpretation that some readers might recall from Cramer's 1986 paper, this interpretation now includes a concept of hierarchy--since all advanced-wave echoes traveling from the future to the past are not equal.

Cramer's writing style is simultaneously playful and profound, with moments of dazzling clarity and equally sparkling wit, such as describing the Copenhagen Interpretation as the "don't ask, don't tell" interpretation of the quantum world. I especially enjoy reading the fanciful analogy example of tossing a quantum wave-particle beer bottle into the water near Boston Harbor, "The bottle disappeared, producing waves that spread out across the Atlantic Ocean in all directions from the entry point. Some of these waves traveled toward England and France and Spain and Western Africa and Eastern South America. In particular, some waves from the bottle traveled over the North Sea to the harbor area of Copenhagen. There the waves abruptly disappeared, and my beer bottle suddenly appeared in its original form on the Copenhagen dock." This example illustrates the seemingly bizarre nature of quantum physics.

"The Quantum Handshake" develops a solid case for physicist John G. Cramer's transactional interpretation of quantum physics, first published in 1986. It starts with an illustrated general history of quantum physics and physicists that is easy for any reader to follow--including the fascinating history of how Gilbert N. Lewis, John A. Wheeler, and Richard P. Feynman first envisioned the advanced-retarded handshake when considering how manipulation of Maxwell’s equations produces the electromagnetic wave equation. Because the wave equation is second-order in time, it has two independent time solutions. Cramer's graduate school professor wrote both solutions on the blackboard before drawing a big X through one of them--the advanced-wave solution, saying this was because the advanced solution went in the wrong time direction and violated the “causality boundary condition." He then said the retarded-wave solution was OK, because it was consistent with causality and the idea that a time delay was required for light to propagate from one location to another. This was the "Aha!" moment for Cramer, where he observed and pointed out that causation makes no logical sense as a boundary condition, because as he pointed out to his professor in graduate school, "Boundary conditions describe known conditions at boundaries." Wheeler and Feynman wrote a paper in 1945 in which they constructed a time-symmetric formalism and then used real boundary conditions involving future absorbers to justify causality and the arrow of time that we observe in the real world.

"The Quantum Handshake" is organized into ten chapters and four appendices that guide readers through relevant supporting background information to quantum physics, with particular attention to quantum entanglement, non-locality, and time reversal before providing a detailed description of the Transactional Interpretation, and numerous examples of how various quantum paradoxes can be resolved with the Transactional Interpretation. Beautiful illustrations throughout the body of the text and the appendices make it much easier to visualize the concepts being described for readers at all levels of familiarity with quantum physics.

One of the things I love most about "The Quantum Handshake" is the way it doesn't avoid difficult questions and paradoxes, but instead dedicates a great deal of thought and discussion to some of the more challenging questions, puzzles and ideas. Some of the paradoxes discussed include: Thomas Young's two-slit experiment, Einstein's bubble gedankenexperiment, Schrodinger's cat, Wigner's friend, Renninger's negative-result gedankenexperiment, transmission of photons through non-commuting polarizing filters, Wheeler's delayed choice experiment, the Freedman-Clauser experiment and EPR paradox, the Hanbury Brown Twiss Effect, the Albert-Aharonov-D'Amato predictions, the quantum eraser, interaction-free measurements, the quantum zeno effect, Maudlin's gedankenexperiment, the Afshar experiment, and many more. I was especially pleased to see Gisin's work and Hardy's work were included, indicating that this book is considering some of the most current research and work being done in the field that I've recently been following with great interest.

"The Quantum Handshake" is an extraordinarily important book at this point in time when the field of quantum physics is over one hundred years old, and ever-increasing fields of science demand a more comprehensive and philosophically complete understanding of quantum physics in order to best utilize the full riches that quantum physics have to offer.

I highly recommend "The Quantum Handshake" to all readers intrigued by quantum physics in general, and seeking the holy grail of the quantum paradigm in particular.
 
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This book shines bright light into the dim recesses of quantum theory, where the mysteries of entanglement, nonlocality, and wave collapse have motivated some to conjure up multiple universes, and others to adopt a "shut up and calculate" mentality. After an extensive and accessible introduction to quantum mechanics and its history, the author turns attention to his transactional model. Using a quantum handshake between normal and time-reversed waves, this model provides a clear visual picture explaining the baffling experimental results that flow daily from the quantum physics laboratories of the world. To demonstrate its powerful simplicity, the transactional model is applied to a collection of counter-intuitive experiments and conceptual problems.

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