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The Underground Railroad (Pulitzer Prize…
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The Underground Railroad (Pulitzer Prize Winner) (National Book Award… (vuoden 2016 painos)

– tekijä: Colson Whitehead (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut / Maininnat
5,7673611,292 (4.04)1 / 609
Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted. Their first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city's placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:mlouer
Teoksen nimi:The Underground Railroad (Pulitzer Prize Winner) (National Book Award Winner) (Oprah's Book Club): A Novel
Kirjailijat:Colson Whitehead (Tekijä)
Info:Doubleday (2016), Edition: First Edition, 320 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:-

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

The Underground Railroad (tekijä: Colson Whitehead)

  1. 90
    Minun kansani, minun rakkaani (tekijä: Toni Morrison) (shaunie)
    shaunie: Morrison's masterpiece is a clear influence on Whitehead's book, and his is one of the very few I've read which bears comparison with it. In fact I'd go so far as to say it's also a masterpiece, a stunningly good read!
  2. 20
    Underground Airlines (tekijä: Ben H. Winters) (elenchus)
    elenchus: That popular culture phenomenon of the uncanny twins, two works appearing together yet unrelated in authorship, production, inspiration. Why do they appear together? In this case, each is compelling enough to read based on their own, but for me irresistable now they've shown up onstage at the same time. Ben Winters's Underground Airlines a bizarro underground railroad, updated (for reasons left implicit) for air travel; Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad making the escape trail a concrete reality. Each also addresses our world, in between stations.… (lisätietoja)
  3. 10
    Twelve Years a Slave (tekijä: Solomon Northup) (charlie68)
    charlie68: Both describe the brutalities of slavery.
  4. 10
    Juuret (tekijä: Alex Haley) (charlie68)
  5. 10
    Exit West (tekijä: Mohsin Hamid) (vwinsloe)
    vwinsloe: Both books use a magical means of transportation to illuminate the plight of refugees (runaway slaves in one and immigrants in the other.)
  6. 10
    Salvage the Bones (tekijä: Jesmyn Ward) (sturlington)
  7. 10
    The Known World (tekijä: Edward P. Jones) (lottpoet)
  8. 00
    Homegoing (tekijä: Yaa Gyasi) (chwiggy)
  9. 00
    The Water Dancer (tekijä: Ta-Nehisi Coates) (g33kgrrl)
    g33kgrrl: Two amazing authors, two different literary approaches to the underground railroad, two stories, one terrible time in US history.
  10. 01
    Steal Away Home: One Woman's Epic Flight to Freedom - And Her Long Road Back to the South (tekijä: Karolyn Smardz Frost) (figsfromthistle)
  11. 01
    Oraakkelin kirja (tekijä: Philip K. Dick) (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Disturbing Alternate Histories of America.
  12. 04
    Tuulen viemää (tekijä: Margaret Mitchell) (charlie68)
    charlie68: A classic not a pc one but from a southern viewpoint.
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englanti (335)  espanja (5)  saksa (4)  ranska (2)  hollanti (2)  katalaani (2)  merirosvokieli (1)  tanska (1)  italia (1)  latvia (1)  Kaikki kielet (354)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 354) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
This was not an easy book to read. Slavery is not a feel-good topic. But whenever I started to get overwhelmed by the horror of Cora's situation I got some relief in her appreciation of tiny boons like a small square plot of dirt or a crooked hole in the wall. In The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead depicts the cruelty of US slavery on the one hand and the compassion and courage of the human spirit on the other. I've just finished the book and my head is still spinning. It's that powerful. ( )
  Linda_Louise | Jan 20, 2021 |
Slavery is never an easy topic to read about whether one is reading fiction or nonfiction. Colson Whitehead does an admirable job of presenting a historically accurate depiction of a young female slave from Georgia. The plantation Cora grew up on is like many others of its kind: cotton is king and life is utterly miserable and, typically, short-lived for the numerous slaves. Cora's life was made all the more miserable because her mother ran away when Cora was young and was never found. Her mother's successful escape has reverberations which affect Cora throughout the rest of the book.

The fact that this story is a partial alternate history was completely unknown to me prior to reading it. I was unaware that the underground railroad in Whitehead's version is an actual physical railroad with tunnels underground that ferries slaves to safety. There are other alternate features which make Cora's situation more compelling, such as North Carolina banning all blacks from their state and South Carolina trying to create a black sub-culture in which slaves are given certain freedoms and help to "improve" but also controlled in more subtle ways than outright slavery as we know it.

I have read criticism of Whitehead's portrayal of Cora because she is a difficult character to get close to. She is standoffish and less empathetic than many people apparently expect a runaway slave to be. Cora does not easily allow herself to get close to any of the other slaves or the people who help her in her quest for freedom. But I thought the representation of a young woman who has lived her entire life as a slave and who is injured from her experience, both physically and psychologically, to be understandably distant. The reader should be able to understand that Cora's life has been so terrible that she has to remain at a distance from everyone, including the reader, to protect herself. We are not privy to every painful inner thought and must rely on Cora's actions and words to determine what kind of person she is. We have to judge as outsiders if Cora's story is worthy of being told, and I believe her story was both worthy and well-told.
( )
  boldforbs | Jan 15, 2021 |
In terms of cognitive load, it's an easy read in a nice pleasant, effortless style, and it's a pretty gripping story too.

I was initially skeptical of the concept of an actual underground railroad and haven't really tried to sort out why Whitehead made that choice, though maybe it has something to do with giving a sort of corporeality to the railroad much as the narrative piles up bodies affected by slavery. That is, you can talk about slavery in the abstract, and it's not as meaningful as when you start talking about particulars; similarly, the effort and risk that went into running the underground railroad is easy to miss until you give the railroad physical presence and set the effort of running the historical railroad up next to the tough work of actually tunneling to build a physical railroad. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
The writing was marvelous, the story was engaging and the characters were real. Very satisfying book. ( )
  FurbyKirby | Jan 5, 2021 |
Sophisticated and painful. Those are the two words I would use to describe Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad. First, I want to reflect on why the book was important for me personally. Then I’ll give a little response to the literary style.

As I finish the book, I’m left with the question: how can the United States heal the brokenness and walls between whites and blacks?

At several points in the narrative, I wanted to simply find a book summary online and put the book down. It hurts to hear how sick and disgusting American history is, riddled with unspeakable evil. Yet, that’s the problem, I feel. We (white folks) want to look away and forget the past, sweep it under the rug and claim: “Racism is beaten! We elected a black president!” Yet, when you compare the Jewish Holocaust to slavery in the US, we cannot help but admit that Germany has done much better at working through the difficult process of healing as a country. For instance, after executing millions without cause, the German government refuses to execute people. That makes sense. “Never again” has been their battle cry. Yet, after enslaving millions over the course of hundreds of years, the US imprisons/enslaves millions more today through the prison system, and disproportionately more black people. How?! Why?! We (again, white people) must face our ugly history with eyes wide open. This I believe is the first step in finding healing – to honestly hear and acknowledge the unrelenting terror we were for African Americans.

As an aside, black people and others of color, talk about race because they see it. They are forced to reckon with the injustices and generational trauma and brokenness passed down from racism in America. White people receive the privileges of race unknowingly. We all are blind to our blindness. To see what we are blind to requires help from those who can see. I learn best about the shortcomings of individualism from those of a collectivist culture. I learn best about gender inequalities from those most affected by gender inequality, ie. women. I learn about race best from people of color. This should be common knowledge.

The second personal response is a humble fear of mob mentality. I would love to think I would have been wise enough 200 years ago to call slavery an abomination, and to fight in abolishing it. But I’ll never know. Perhaps I would have been arrogant and violent, like so many. I do not and cannot know. What evils today am I blind to? No doubt I assume a chronological arrogance, assuming we’re better today than any time before us. How am I unknowingly complicit to capitalism, consumerism, individualism, militarism, and patriarchy – not to mention other unknown influences. I like to think I’ve got it figured out, but I know that’s not true.

God have mercy. Lord have mercy.

At the beginning of the book I thought to myself: “This is one of the books everyone in America should read.” However, after Cora stepped onto an actual underground train, I realized it’s a novel and not historical fiction. Sadly, I feel many ignorant Americans will be confused.

I have little doubt that much of his nuance and historical references went over my head. Why, for example, do they ride a literal underground train? Why is there a skyscraper in South Carolina in the early 1800s? Why does he portray slavery in North Carolina the way he does? I have guesses, but it left me wondering, “Is that really how history played out?” Did they really stone people for harboring runaway slaves? Was slavery really that bad? Did they infect runaway slaves with syphilis? Was there an actual Freedom Trail in NC? Was there a farm like Valentine in Indiana?

Perhaps that’s what he wants – people to do research and learn more of the history, which is what I ended up doing. I learned that North Carolina mirrored how they treated blacks in the northwest. I learned about the Tuskegee syphilis experiment. That the skyscraper in S. Carolina was a literary device depicting progress and sophistication. I learned most of all that the unrelenting horrors were accurate.

We must acknowledge and lament our history. It seems the only way forward.

The more I think about the book, the more I appreciate it. For the one ignorant of American history, they might be confused. For the other, knowledgeable of the different ways Americans treated slavery, it’s a masterpiece.
( )
  nrt43 | Dec 29, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 354) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Der Roman des afroamerikanischen Autors Colson Whitehead über die Sklaverei in den USA des 19. Jahrhunderts kommt in deutscher Übersetzung nun gerade recht, um auf den heutigen Rassismus zu verweisen.
 

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The first time Caesar approached Cora about running north, she said no.
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. . . for justice may be slow and invisible, but it always renders its true verdict in the end.
‘I’m what botanists call a hybrid,’ he said the first time Cora heard him speak. ‘A mixture of two different families. In flowers, such a concoction pleases the eye. When that amalgamation takes its shape in flesh and blood, some take great offense. In this room we recognize it for what it is -- a new beauty come into the world, and it is in bloom all around us.’
Georgina said the children make of it what they can. What they don't understand today, they might tomorrow. 'The Declaration is like a map. You trust that it's right, but you only know by going out and testing it yourself.'
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted. Their first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city's placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels.

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