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Oblivion: Stories – tekijä: David Foster…
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Oblivion: Stories (vuoden 2005 painos)

– tekijä: David Foster Wallace

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
2,229355,188 (3.92)44
In the stories that make up Oblivion, David Foster Wallace joins the rawest, most naked humanity with the infinite involutions of self-consciousness--a combination that is dazzlingly, uniquely his. These are worlds undreamt of by any other mind. Only David Foster Wallace could convey a father's desperate loneliness by way of his son's daydreaming through a teacher's homicidal breakdown ("The Soul Is Not a Smithy"). Or could explore the deepest and most hilarious aspects of creativity by delineating the office politics surrounding a magazine profile of an artist who produces miniature sculptures in an anatomically inconceivable way ("The Suffering Channel"). Or capture the ache of love's breakdown in the painfully polite apologies of a man who believes his wife is hallucinating the sound of his snoring ("Oblivion"). Each of these stories is a complete world, as fully imagined as most entire novels, at once preposterously surreal and painfully immediate.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:frank555
Teoksen nimi:Oblivion: Stories
Kirjailijat:David Foster Wallace
Info:Abacus (2005), Edition: New edition, Paperback, 336 pages
Kokoelmat:Reread, Oma kirjasto, Suosikit
Arvio (tähdet):
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Oblivion (tekijä: David Foster Wallace)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 35) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Zo. Dit was alvast het meest uitdagende boek van David Foster Wallace dat ik las, misschien wel het meest uitdagende boek dat ik ooit las tout court.

Nu was het een doel van Foster Wallace om zijn lezers uit te dagen en hen "net als in het echte leven" te leren genieten van dingen waarvoor ze moesten werken, omdat hij dat als een meerwaarde beschouwde tegenover de eenvoudige, hapklare populaire tv-cultuur. Die missie is alvast geslaagd, me dunkt.

Vier sterren gaf ik toch met overtuiging (een halve ster ongetwijfeld voor mezelf, omdat ik de uitdaging ben aangegaan en niet opgaf toen ze te zwaar leek te worden) 3,5 voor het boek omdat het een verhalenbundel is, en je niet alle verhalen over dezelfde kam kan scheren.

Van de acht verhalen zijn er enkele waarover ik niets te vertellen heb maar met plezier las (3 sterren) en andere die me nog lang zullen bijblijven (4 sterren).
Sommige verhalen bloeiden open naarmate ik aandachtiger werd of verder vorderde, andere leken hermetisch gesloten te blijven maar boeiden me toch.
Wie Wallace leest omwille van zijn stijl zal nooit ontgoocheld worden en telkens opnieuw geprikkeld worden. Wie Wallace leest omwille van zijn sociaal empatisch vermogen zal ook niet ontgoocheld worden, al is het soms graven door de verschillende stijl-lagen heen om die te vinden.
Maar laat dat nu net zijn kracht zijn: de verhalen die me lagen en waarin ik mijn weg vond, fileerden relevante kanten van ons bestaan op manieren die ik voorheen niet zag. Ik geloof dat Wallace daarin net een meester was: de weg zo plaveien, soms vol obstakels en doornen, dat als de boodschap bereikt wordt, ze glashelder is. En dan ben je als lezer niet alleen verheugd dat je de uitdaging bent aangegaan, maar evenzeer verblind, geraakt of verbluft door de dingen die Wallace voor je klaar heeft gelegd. Straf.
( )
  GertDeBie | Mar 22, 2021 |
If you are considering reading the ultimate post-modernist work, Wallace's Infinite Jest, but you just can't commit to reading a 1,000-page novel, get a taste of it with these stories. In them, DFW experiments with facets of the techniques that make his writing unique: the narcissistic neurotic who overanalyzes himself; the boring job reported in detail; the absurdities of American corporations; the speech tics that make his characters painfully real; suicide; childhood trauma; unusual physical deformities and abilities. All these themes appear here in exquisitely crafted stories that echo Infinite Jest and prefigure The Pale King. ( )
  stephkaye | Dec 14, 2020 |
Al igual que en Entrevistas breves con hombres repulsivos y La niña del pelo raro, los relatos de Extinción son brillantes, y sin duda se merecen cinco estrellas. Sin embargo, Señor Blandito (el primero de los "relatos" (que más bien son novellas)) ha hecho de mis casi dos horas leyéndolo las más tediosas e insoportables de entre todas las que me he pasado leyendo cualquier libro. Además, La filosofía y el espejo de la naturaleza dejaba mucho que desear si se compara con la absoluta magnificencia del resto de relatos. Por lo tanto, y por mis contradictorios sentimientos, cuatro estrellas. ( )
  victorvila | Oct 29, 2020 |
David Foster Wallace is divisive, and with good reason. I'll try my best not to dive too deep into my opinion of the author; it's more or less irrelevant. But I do think his flaws as a man shine through into his literature. Sometimes it feels like DFW has his head too far up his own ass. A modest man simply doesn't write the 1000 page Infinite Jest, and frankly he shouldn't have. That is, he shouldn't have dedicated his career to torturous and inaccessible writings. Wallace was a wizard, one of the greatest prose writers of the last 50 years. Possibly the most recent entry into the grand American literary canon. But it seemed as though he demanded everything he write be hard to read, and he succeeded, much to the chagrin of everyone that isn't willing to pretend they've read a book to seem super smart.

I'm not super smart. But I don't really mind that much, so I freely admit that a Wallace book is like a brick wall to get through. However, underneath it all is the classic story of the tortured genius, the artist in pain. Oblivion is some of his better work: an ultimately uneven and disjointed collection of essays, it feels tossed together but still quietly significant. Wallace is also performing some of his most pessimistic work in this book, with some of the stories being incredibly bleak with no sign of light at the end of the tunnel. What changed, since Jest, when he proposed that language and communication holds the key to breaking from our media-induced hypnoses? Maybe as he got older he got more disenchanted with the world (which is not even a theory, really). Maybe he intended Pale King to follow this book up to provide the blueprint out of the weeds. Or maybe he just wanted to wanted to write about bleakness, darkness, oblivion.

There's 3 grounds to evaluate a book on. Well, there's a lot more than 3, but I use 3 big ones. Intention, Affect, and Merit. The problem with Wallace is that I value his writing so much on literary merit, but question what he's always trying to accomplish and don't always love the result personally. This book is generally no exception, although it's more complicated than that. There's really two Wallaces that emerge from this book, depending on the story and how each one lands for you. Either you see his excessive description as sophomoric and weak, an attempt at using random details to sound smart and immersive, when all it really does is bog down the more interesting themes in a bunch of bullshit that scares away casual readers. Or, you can see his description as a brilliant way to establish humanity- our selves are so intimately tied to random pieces of information and identity, soaking a story in minutia is the only real way to make it seem like something that would happen in modern America. There's nothing more American than random bullshit. What I like about these stories, as opposed to his brick novels, is that the description doesn't generally feel like the means to an end, it's not building to anything. Building to something makes description a tool for some higher purpose, which wouldn't explain why it's so painful to read. The better use for it, and the one more commonly employed here, is that the the description is not a means to an end but an end in of itself.

No matter what, this is all a pretty nuanced line to walk. I have a lot of conflicting thoughts about DFW that extend beyond this book. I'd re-review Infinite Jest every 6 months if I could, but that would probably require reading it again and I refuse to do so. Wallace's stories and essays are a more digestible form of his writing, where one can properly appreciate his talents without having to resort to cult worship just to find the motivation to get through all the footnotes. Oblivion isn't great, but it's good! Several of the essays even get up to fantastic territory, but you have to do some digging to get there.

Which makes this book an incredible starting point for DFW. If that's what you're looking for, find it here. But go in with an open mind, really read each page, and don't tie this book (or any other) to your identity or sense of intellect. No book is worth that. But this book is great for literary nerds and could lead you down a path of writing that is ripe for the chewing and analyzing.

Wallace believed that there were 3 parts of life: shit, art, death. No part was more or less beautiful than the others, all equally important. This book basks in all 3, but doesn't quite find the coherence or optimism to distinguish them. Otherwise, it's typical DFW work, and that should define your opinion of the book. ( )
  MaxAndBradley | May 27, 2020 |
I'm trying to read everything David Foster Wallace has ever written/published, and while I'm completely sold on his nonfiction, I'm fifty-fifty on his fiction. At their best his short stories are personal and disarming and leave you with this mingled sense of repulsion and awe, and this consciousness of something you never knew anyone else knew about yourself. But at their worst, it's just page after page of watching white, middle-class males get vivisected for all their guilt, boredom, and sexual frustration. It's not unsympathetic but it's nothing I can relate to.

That said, when David Foster Wallace hits a nerve, he hits so, so hard! ( )
  uncleflannery | May 16, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 35) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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In the stories that make up Oblivion, David Foster Wallace joins the rawest, most naked humanity with the infinite involutions of self-consciousness--a combination that is dazzlingly, uniquely his. These are worlds undreamt of by any other mind. Only David Foster Wallace could convey a father's desperate loneliness by way of his son's daydreaming through a teacher's homicidal breakdown ("The Soul Is Not a Smithy"). Or could explore the deepest and most hilarious aspects of creativity by delineating the office politics surrounding a magazine profile of an artist who produces miniature sculptures in an anatomically inconceivable way ("The Suffering Channel"). Or capture the ache of love's breakdown in the painfully polite apologies of a man who believes his wife is hallucinating the sound of his snoring ("Oblivion"). Each of these stories is a complete world, as fully imagined as most entire novels, at once preposterously surreal and painfully immediate.

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Perintökirjasto: David Foster Wallace

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Keskiarvo: (3.92)
0.5 4
1 5
1.5
2 16
2.5 9
3 61
3.5 19
4 163
4.5 30
5 98

Hachette Book Group

Hachette Book Group on kustantanut tämän kirjan 2 painosta.

Painokset: 0316010766, 0316919810

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