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The Story of the Stone: Or, The Dream of the…
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The Story of the Stone: Or, The Dream of the Red Chamber, Vol. 3: The… (vuoden 1981 painos)

– tekijä: Cao Xueqin (Tekijä), David Hawkes (Kääntäjä), David Hawkes (Esipuhe)

Sarjat: The Story of the Stone (Volume 3)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
339459,691 (4.26)6
The Story of the Stone (c. 1760), also known by the title of The Dream of the Red Chamber, is the great novel of manners in Chinese literature.Divided into five volumes, of which The Warning Voice is the third, it charts the glory and decline of the illustrious Jia family (a story which closely accords with the fortunes of the author's own family). The two main characters, Bao-yu and Dai-yu, are set against a rich tapestry of humour, realistic detail and delicate poetry, which accurately reflects the ritualized hurly-burly of Chinese family life. But over and above the novel hangs the constant reminder that there is another plane of existence - a theme which affirms the Buddhist belief in a supernatural scheme of things.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:pjkissman
Teoksen nimi:The Story of the Stone: Or, The Dream of the Red Chamber, Vol. 3: The Warning Voice
Kirjailijat:Cao Xueqin (Tekijä)
Muut tekijät:David Hawkes (Kääntäjä), David Hawkes (Esipuhe)
Info:Penguin Classics (1981), Edition: 0003-Revised, 640 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):****
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The Warning Voice (tekijä: Cao Xueqin)

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näyttää 4/4
Quite a change from the last two volumes. In many ways it feels like it comes off the rails, as more and more time gets spent on digressions and the love triangle that's ostensibly at the heart of the plot fades to nothingness. The poetry also all but disappears and gets replaced by high melodrama and a creeping sense of doom. "The beast with a thousand legs is a long time dying," but by Chapter 80 everyone in the household can see the end. It might seem like so many changes to something already perfect would cause the quality to drop, but the growing sense of emptiness and decay produces some of the most beautiful moments of the entire novel so far: the lonely Mid-Autumn Festival, Bao-yu's elegy for Skybright, the flower cards, and of course the long, long saga of Er-jie and San-jie which explodes into the quiet lives of the Jias to reveal just how bad things have been allowed to get. Almost no one makes it out of this book unaltered except, maybe, Dai-yu, but as the last few chapters make clear her fate as well is closing in on her. Despite minor continuity errors and some strange pacing, the writing in this volume is some of Cao Xueqin's finest. If the lost 40 chapters had never been "found," I would say that what we have by the end of the volume would both be enough to make most of the rest of the plot clear, and to confirm The Story of the Stone as an awe-inspiring, life-changing work of art. ( )
  Roeghmann | Dec 8, 2019 |
My reading of this saga has slowed somewhat, due to being really busy, but I'm still making my way through, and I still get immersed when I am reading it. Two more volumes to go. This was the longest of the five. I think volume two is my favourite so far, followed by this one, and then the first volume. ( )
  xiaomarlo | Apr 17, 2019 |
Another fine instalment by David Hawkes, the third volume of Story of the Stone continues the saga of the Jia family, their day-to-day lives and the growing relationship between Jia Baoyu and Lin Daiyu. As Hawkes admits, the third volume does start to show inconsistencies in plot and characters but the translator admirably resolves these issues. Overall, it is an excellent translation (though as I have mentioned, there are issues with the poetry) and Hawkes has shown his skills in making one of the great Chinese novels accessible to all. ( )
1 ääni xuebi | May 30, 2014 |
Volume 3 finds the significant idea in Buddhist that one would open his eyes to the vanity of human affections and causes a person to renounce the world, for one no longer subscribes to the conventions of the mundane, dust-stained world and thrives to be detached from it.

The title of this gripping, escalating volume, The Warning Voice, duly confirms the intractable decadence of the Jias. Tolstoy's opening line in Anna Karenina best describes the unfavorable miasma - "All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." Outsiders look at the Jias and all its wealth and immediately think how happy the Jias must be, they don't realize the vexations far outweigh the advantages and privileges. Being a big family with its numerous maids' converting to mistresses and concubines, daily fuss and drama are inevitable. These mistresses are conceited, usually full of their own importance, and always take offense at the most trivial matter, and at the slightest bit of cross do they begin to spread rumors to stir up trouble. It is under such quarrelsome milieu that the Jias gradually wanes. Volume 3 begins with the domestic hierarchy of maids in the house and how in the sabbatical of Xi-feng from managing house duties the well being of the family is left at the mercy of the senior maids.

In the event of an imperial member's death, the Jia ladyships take to daily excursion to the palace where they attend ceremonies during the mourning period (usually spans 100 days during Ming and Qing dynasties). Their stewards and stewardesses are no less occupied with accompanying them and seeing that preparations are readied ahead of time. Lacking discipline normally imposed by these officers and being deprived of Xi-feng's invidiously stringent implementation of rules on the operation of the house, domestics of both mansions (Rong and Ning) grow slovenly in the duties. Some take advantage of the exceptional circumstances to allay themselves with those placed temporarily in charge. Others, like the ex-actresses who remain under the Jias' patronage, become so imperious, demanding and fastidious about their commodities that the servants remain silent to avoid disputations. The urgent call for economizing adds fuel to the flame as the household is plagued by quarrel over the harvest of the garden, which is divided up among the growers and keepers. In a matter of weeks, happenings within the mansion render the whole place in a state of mutiny. The Rong and Ning mansions are inevitably left at the mercy of the few loyal, experienced senior maids who even go as far as bending authority to spare an innocent maid the accusation of stealing.

Some of the most memorable scenes of THE DREAM OF THE RED CHAMBER are indubitably those that concern Jia Lian's secret second marriage and its aftermath. The cunning Xi-feng deliberately conceals her knowledge of the shameful matter and executes her plan silently. Keeping her anger at bay and taking advantage of her rival's lacking in guile, Xi-feng entreats her rival to live with her, feigns kindness and makes her rival feel reassured about her future in the bosom of so delightful a family. Xi-feng's forbearance and outward gesture of kindness greatly mystify everyone who knows about the matter but little does anyone know about her true intent to rid of this new mistress. The treacherous Xi-feng surreptitiously draws up a fictitious court case accusing her own husband of taking an unlawful wife during national mourning and family mourning in order to rid of her rival indirectly. Her strategy is to stir up a betrothal agreement concerning her rival in the old days and manipulates the formerly affianced to bring a written indictment against her own husband before the court.

Insubordination and deterioration of moral standard infest the garden and infuriate Lady Wang. In her opinion each one of the maids in the garden is potential corrupter of her son Bao-yu. She orders a raid of the garden at the awestruck finding of a lewd picture. Secret investigation on the obscene brick-a-brac immediately takes place with such single-minded persistence and orders all maids to be subjected to her scrutiny. The unforeseen incidence raises alarm in Lady Wang about Bao-yu's squandering his time in the garden. Bao-yu is unprepared for the raging tempest that has just passed over him. The things his mother charges the maids with so uncanny a knowledge of even his most intimate conversations with them that there seem a little point in denial.

This volume faintly presages Bao-yu's determination to grip his own destiny. He thrives to live his life as he wants to and recognizes life'' uncertainty. This is significant in his defiance over the family-decided marriage to Bao-chai and his firm refusal to let go of his feeling and affection for Lin Dai-yu. It can be inferred that in his ineffable pain of losing Dai-yu that he has conceived the incipient thought to break away from the dust-stained world. Buddhist teaching dictates the second half of this climax-reaching volume of the novel. At the depletion of wealth and the dimming of glitter the truth of Buddha outshines the taste of luxury that is proven to be vanity at best. Out of the sea of suffering, one might turn the light and resolve to abjure the world and its vanities in order to prepare for the life to come. This idea burgeons toward the end of The Warning Voice as a sign and will be further explored in Volume 4. ( )
1 ääni mattviews | Feb 20, 2006 |
näyttää 4/4
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (4 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Cao Xueqinensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetlaskettu
Bergman, PärKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Chu PangKansikuvataiteilijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Hawkes, DavidKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu

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FOR JEAN

(Penguin Classics, translated by David Hawkes)
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TO CONTINUE OUR STORY,

Cousin Zhen and Jia Lian had secretly instructed their pages to have a large flat-bottomed basket of largesse-money in readiness, and when they heard Grandmother Jia call out ‘Largesse!’, they told the pages to take this basket and empty it onto the stage.

(Penguin Classics, translated by David Hawkes)
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This is part 3 (of 5) of the complete work variously known as A Dream of Red Mansions , The Dream of the Red Chamber, or The Story of the Stone, by Cao Xueqin (also known as Tsao Hsueh-chin) and Kao Ngo (also known as Kao Hgo, or Gao E). Please distinguish it from the complete work, any abridged versions, or any other portions. Thank you.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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The Story of the Stone (c. 1760), also known by the title of The Dream of the Red Chamber, is the great novel of manners in Chinese literature.Divided into five volumes, of which The Warning Voice is the third, it charts the glory and decline of the illustrious Jia family (a story which closely accords with the fortunes of the author's own family). The two main characters, Bao-yu and Dai-yu, are set against a rich tapestry of humour, realistic detail and delicate poetry, which accurately reflects the ritualized hurly-burly of Chinese family life. But over and above the novel hangs the constant reminder that there is another plane of existence - a theme which affirms the Buddhist belief in a supernatural scheme of things.

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