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Go Set a Watchman: A Novel Tekijä: Harper…
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Go Set a Watchman: A Novel (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2015; vuoden 2015 painos)

Tekijä: Harper Lee (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut / Maininnat
10,127448745 (3.33)4 / 304
Classic Literature. Fiction. Literature. HTML:

Performed by Reese Witherspoon

#1 New York Times Bestseller

"Go Set a Watchman is such an important book, perhaps the most important novel on race to come out of the white South in decades." New York Times

A landmark novel by Harper Lee, set two decades after her beloved Pulitzer Prizewinning masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird.

Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch"Scout"returns home to Maycomb, Alabama from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise's homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town, and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the pasta journey that can only be guided by one's own conscience.

Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of the late Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor, and effortless precisiona profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context, and new meaning to an American classic.

.
… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Dreynolds12
Teoksen nimi:Go Set a Watchman: A Novel
Kirjailijat:Harper Lee (Tekijä)
Info:Harper (2015), Edition: 1st Edition, 288 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):*
Avainsanoja:historical fiction, history, fiction

Teostiedot

Kaikki taivaan linnut (tekijä: Harper Lee) (2015)

  1. 132
    Kuin surmaisi satakielen (tekijä: Harper Lee) (JuliaMaria, KayCliff)
    JuliaMaria: Harper Lee hat nur zwei Bücher veröffentlicht. Das zweite - "Gehe hin, stelle einen Wächter" - erst mit 90 Jahren - auch wenn es schon früher geschrieben wurde. Es war die literarische Sensation des Jahres 2015.
    KayCliff: Go Set a Watchman is the sequel to To Kill a Mocking Bird
  2. 52
    Yksinäinen sydän (tekijä: Carson McCullers) (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Another story of the south by an author with similar background.
  3. 30
    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (tekijä: Mildred D. Taylor) (amanda4242)
  4. 20
    Optimistin tytär (tekijä: Eudora Welty) (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Moving and bittersweet, these Southern Gothic novels portray women pushed to their emotional limits as they return home and re-establish old relationships. Both are literary and character-driven, with a thoughtful style that also references mid-twentieth-century events and attitudes.… (lisätietoja)
  5. 10
    Four Spirits (tekijä: Sena Jeter Naslund) (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Although Go Set a Watchman takes a more humorous approach than Four Spirits, both novels, set in the mid-twentieth-century South, spotlight the effects of the Civil Rights Movement on individuals. They are captivating, character-driven cameos representing society as a whole.… (lisätietoja)
  6. 10
    Tongues of flame (tekijä: Mary Ward Brown) (andrewcorser)
    andrewcorser: Further insight into the Southern States
  7. 10
    The Keepers of the House (tekijä: Shirley Ann Grau) (vwinsloe)
    vwinsloe: Southern values shortly before the civil rights era
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» Katso myös 304 mainintaa

englanti (438)  italia (4)  saksa (2)  espanja (2)  hollanti (1)  norja (1)  Kaikki kielet (448)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 448) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Well, this wasn't quite as awful as I was expecting, so that's nice. It's definitely a first draft of an early idea but the author we love from TKAM. I think the theme of watching your idol become human is a good one, though it's hard to see it be because of racism. There was a lot of racism here, but i know the language is true of the era and ideas, no matter how despicable they are. ( )
  KallieGrace | Jul 10, 2024 |
Within an hour of putting GSAW on my currently reading shelf I had someone already complain to me about how racist and horrible it was. So I knew I was already in for a long story or so I thought.

I should say first what this book isn't: It isn't a sequel to To Kill A Mockingbird. It's easy to see how people would assume that because of the same characters we grew up with in TKAM being in this one. In reality this is a draft OF TKAM that Lee decided to rewrite and then went on to become the novel we grew up with in schools for about 50 or so years. So we have to put things a little in to perspective when we go through Watchman.

Yes, even tho it's a draft Watchman fits VERY well as a continuation of the story begun with Mockingbird. So well in fact that people assume it is which is just an indication to Lee's ability to stay engaging and consistent as an author. The only downside to an alluring story is that we tend to hold it in such high esteem than anything which tries to view that book in a new light or change any bit becomes a point of contention.

Atticus....is a racist. People screamed and howled about it totally forgetting a few important points: Eventually, Scout is going to grow up and people change.

Once you get beyond the shallow controversy you find a slow and sleepy narrative that mirrors the hometown of Scout herself as she visits her family and society that shes left for New York. It doesn't take long before she realizes her father has changed: He's getting older, his health is not what it once was and worse of all Scout expect everything to remain the same. She doesn't accept that change is a constant thing but works in its own ways and that she herself can't control it, even if she has good intentions. It's a much slower pacing without any big climax as one might expect tho it flows well painting Scout in a way I hadn't expected to see her. She is an example of the restlessness of the time it was written in when people were ready to push forward yet had no real idea on HOW. The clash between Scout's mindset and the approach of atticus to the issues of the day are a startling contrast that overlaps the uneasy politics they were grappling with at large.

Very rich personalities and spirit against a cross section of mindsets makes Watchman very likable as long as one's ready to let it stand on its own and stop comparing it to Mockingbird. We've grown up since first reading it in school, so should we let Scout and Atticus grow up as well. ( )
  MissNerdinatrix | Jun 26, 2024 |
Whether or not the publication behind this is true, and if this is to be true as an iconic sequel let's truly say this was written in a way that embraced the original story, boy did this fall flat. Hard. I detested this book and could hardly bring my self to finish the thing. I hate leaving books undone but I don't think I've ever truly sped read a book in my life. This was a disaster. A chore. ( )
  Dreynolds12 | Jun 17, 2024 |
We may never know the true story behind this book's publication -- when it was actually "discovered", whether Harper Lee knew about and/or had the capacity to condone its release, or whether her sister had been working to keep this work under wraps. What we do know is that in the early 60's an incredibly talented writer named Harper Lee wanted to write a book about race. At some point in that journey she submitted a version titled "Go Set a Watchman" to an astute editor who sent it back to her, and in time (and with many re-writes and edits) the world was gifted with "To Kill a Mockingbird."

While I've read TKAM several times, I chose not to re-read it prior to reading GSAW, which allowed me the perspective to read GSAW like a stand alone book, with characters who just happened to share the same names as those in TKAM.

I won't rehash the plot and character points in GSAW -- others have done it much more eloquently than I can. I'll simply say that if Lee's objective was to write a book about race, she triumphed with TKAM as her legacy. While race and racism are large factors in GSAW, the book is really about that moment when a person first acknowledges his/her parents' fallibility (and their own values):

"As you grew up, when you were grown, totally unknown to yourself, you confused your father with God. You never saw him as a man with a man’s heart, and a man’s failings – I’ll grant you it may have been hard to see, he make so few mistakes, but he makes 'em like all of us. You were an emotional cripple, leaning on him, getting all the answers from him, assuming that your answers would always be his answers." Pg. 265

While the book was choppy in places, and and some plot points contradicted others (a result of this being a draft without having gone through an editing process) I still enjoyed the book and consider it a testament to Lee's remarkable talent at how well written the book was, even without the benefit of professional editing. 4 stars. ( )
  jj24 | May 27, 2024 |
I'm sure you can all tell two things about this book immediately:
1. It was one of the most anticipated books (at least in America), like, ever.
2. It is now super super controversial.
And I'm not even going to get into the whole question of whether or not ancient Harper Lee is still capable of consenting to having her over-a-half-century-old first draft of To Kill A Mockingbird published. But I really appreciated this as a sequel to TKAM. Not because it made me happy, but it made me think, and it adds far more depth to TKAM.
There is one issue, which is peripheral to the plot of GSAW but pretty central to TKAM. This book references Tom Robinson's rape trial, but in this version the outcome was different. I understand why the case ended up being decided the way it was in TKAM. It built Atticus's lesson of what courage is: “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what." Atticus's lesson only makes sense if he doesn't win the case and knows he probably won't. But it is a tad awkward-feeling to read that Tom was acquitted.
I think this book is best understood and appreciated when you can think of some parts in their context as a first draft and some as a sequel. Clearly, the different decision in the rape trial is a symptom of the revisions that what we now know as GSAW went through before becoming our beloved TKAM.
But, once upon a time, in the 1950s, a young woman named Harper Lee set out to write a novel about another young woman named Jean Louise Finch finding out that her father wasn't the hero she idolized. Through a number of flashbacks, she established Scout's unconditional admiration for Atticus, the perfect lawyer and perfect father who can do anything. What other dad will NOT approach you about your somewhat creepy behavior because your kind-of-boyfriend reported it in a situation to which lawyer-client confidentiality applies? We'd all love a dad like that.
And that's what we were given.
The editor loved all those lovable scenes more than the heavy adult discussions, and so young Harper Lee rewrote the book to be about this hilarious little girl Scout and her amazing dad. And we were children with Scout, and we fell in love.
How many articles on "X ways Atticus Finch was perfect" (pre-2015) can you find with a quick Google search? Okay, I haven't checked, but probably like a thousand, if you're only counting the ones in English. For half a century, multiple generations have been permitted to idolize Atticus just like Scout did. And Uncle Jack might deny that there is such a thing as a collective consciousness, but together we all forgot that we were looking through the eyes of a child.
All along, the entire point was that Atticus WASN'T perfect. He did very good things for really crappy reasons which had some correct reasoning behind them and some that was a result of growing up in a country surrounded by truly institutionalized racism. And the whole point of the book was that Scout was finally growing up. Dr. Finch even said it to her- she needed to separate her conscience from her father's and become her own person. And to do that, she had to take Atticus off the pedestal she'd put him on for the 26 previous years of her life.
Now, maybe a book review oughtn't be a critique of the book's readers, but here I go.
I think that the people who hate the publishers of this book for letting Atticus be so different from the man in TKAM, and the people who hate Scout for in some sense accepting Atticus, haven't grown up. Crazy little Scout has finally passed you in maturity. When she was a little girl, she saw her father as the culmination of all things pure and noble. When she grew up, she still saw her father as essentially a god. Ageless and unchanging in his truth and goodness. But eventually she was faced with undeniable proof that he was a human being just like her, a man with contradictions and mistakes and, hey, who's to say that Scout wasn't the wrong one in some of their areas of disagreement? But he was wrong sometimes. Maybe a lot of the time. Maybe in his whole world view. And he always had been. When the 26-year-old child Scout saw this she couldn't bear it. Believe me, my heart was wrapped up on Atticus's perfection too, and the mere concept of him being in any way "bad" hurt me too.
But then Scout and I got a long talking-to from Uncle Jack. Boy, that man rarely makes any sense. We understood so little of what he was getting at, and were won over to mostly none of it. But he still helped us. Somewhere in his long long loooonngg, my goodness, SO LONG, talks, we were able to accept Atticus's fallibility and welcome him to the human race. And we did not agree with him. I feel that in any other era this lesson would be taken for granted, but today it must be stated explicitly- acceptance and agreement are far from the same thing. We now ACCEPT that Atticus is kind of pretty white supremacist. When we were children we saw his perfectly equal treatment of all people and said "There walks a good man who is not ever racist." And we agreed with the lack of racism. But all along, not being exercised, but being believed, was the supremacy. Atticus thought of himself and other white people as better than black people. He treated everyone the same. Both were true, but only one was seen. And the only thing he taught us was to wait in line behind the black people who were there first. We did it because he taught us too. We thought he taught us to because he, like us, was colorblind, when to him it was just manners. It made him feel good. When we discovered the true reasons behind everything he ever taught us, we felt completely lost. Our foundation was gone.
Yet we've long been able to tolerate people like the man who delivered the racist rant in the courtroom- again, not approve of his beliefs, but not have our world shaken by the fact that he exists. Scout never came to agree with Atticus that, really, giving black people equal rights would tear their world apart. She still thought (recognized?) that the Negroes of Maycomb County, the South, the United States, deserved far more than they were being given. But she could accept that Atticus disagreed with her the same way she could accept any random racist Maycomber disagreeing with her- it's his opinion, to which he's entitled, even if it's wrong. He's human like me and I'm wrong sometimes too. I'll probably argue with him if it comes up and I'm at that time in a position to do so, but in the meantime, the world still turns with wrong people in it.
This is a coming-of-age story. Finally, the little girl in a grown woman's body has matured to the point where she can disagree with her dear old dad.

OK so that's what I have to say in GSAW's relationship to TKAM and what is required of you in order to appreciate this book. Well, nothing, really. It kind of slaps you in the face and forces you to grow up. It's hard. It's really hard.

But I also loved this book, maybe as much as TKAM. It was so much the same Scout, just older. I think the first time I laughed out loud was about 3 pages in, when her train bed folded in on her and she needed to be rescued when she didn't have pajama pants on. I loved the awkwardness of puberty, of the first French kiss and its many months of repercussions. I loved the first dance and the items that were present at the beginning but not the end. (I'm so grateful now that I was never invited to prom or a dance early in high school and that I've never had access to fake boobs. NOT WORTH IT.) I loved the revival meeting. A lot of changes certainly happened between GSAW and TKAM, but Scout is Scout. Clever, ignorant, hilarious, human Scout.
I also liked the part where Henry told Jean Louise off about how she could get away with anything she did and no one disliked her any more than they did before she committed whatever newest misdeed. Without saying so, he pointed out that privilege is a lot sneakier than it seems like it should be. Anyone can tell you that in Maycomb county, "the whites" as a a group were privileged, and "the Negroes" as a group were not. But this alone couldn't define what that privilege meant. If you're privileged, blame bounces away from you as an individual and onto circumstances you can't control (in Jean Louise's case, the supposed eccentricities of her family). Responsibility for wrongdoing divides and dispels. If you're part of a not-privileged group, each individual takes on all the blame for the whole group, and the whole group takes on blame for an individual's evil actions- responsibility multiplies to land on every member of that group. This attitude, held by individuals, is what can end up leading to differences in laws.
(unfortunately i need to stop reviewing now. congrats for getting this far. i'll finish later.) ( )
  johanna.florez21 | May 27, 2024 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 448) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Shockingly, in Ms. Lee’s long-awaited novel, “Go Set a Watchman” (due out Tuesday), Atticus is a racist who once attended a Klan meeting, who says things like “The Negroes down here are still in their childhood as a people.” Or asks his daughter: “Do you want Negroes by the carload in our schools and churches and theaters? Do you want them in our world?” The depiction of Atticus in “Watchman” makes for disturbing reading, and for “Mockingbird” fans, it’s especially disorienting. Scout is shocked to find, during her trip home, that her beloved father, who taught her everything she knows about fairness and compassion, has been affiliating with raving anti-integration, anti-black crazies, and the reader shares her horror and confusion. “Mockingbird” suggested that we should have compassion for outsiders like Boo and Tom Robinson, while “Watchman” asks us to have understanding for a bigot named Atticus.
 
And so beneath Atticus’s style of enlightenment is a kind of bigotry that could not recognize itself as such at the time. The historical and human fallacies of the Agrarian ideology hardly need to be rehearsed now, but it should be said that these views were not regarded as ridiculous by intellectuals at the time. Indeed, Jean Louise/Lee herself, though passionately opposed to what her uncle and her father are saying, nevertheless accepts the general terms of the debate as the right ones.
lisäsi danielx | muokkaaNew Yorker, Adam Gopnik (Jul 27, 2015)
 
Go Set a Watchman is a troubling confusion of a novel, politically and artistically, beginning with its fishy origin story. .. I ached for this adult Scout: The civil rights movement may be gathering force, but the second women's movement hasn't happened yet. I wanted to transport Scout to our own time — take her to a performance of Fun Home on Broadway — to know that, if she could only hang on, the possibilities for nonconforming tomboys will open up. Lee herself, writing in the 1950s, lacks the language and social imagination to fully develop this potentially powerful theme.
 
Despite the boldness and bravery of its politics, Go Set a Watchman is a very rough diamond in literary terms … it is a book of enormous literary interest, and questionable literary merit.
 
It is, in most respects, a new work, and a pleasure, revelation and genuine literary event, akin to the discovery of extra sections from T S Eliot’s The Waste Land or a missing act from Hamlet hinting that the prince may have killed his father.
lisäsi Widsith | muokkaaThe Guardian, Mark Lawson (Jul 12, 2015)
 

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (36 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Lee, Harperensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Drews, KristiinaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Johansson, EvaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Witherspoon, ReeseKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
אלפון, מיכלKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu

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Tärkeät paikat
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Tärkeät tapahtumat
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Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
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In memory of Mr. Lee and Alice
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Since Atlanta, she had looked out the dining-car window with a delight almost physical.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
"Every man's island, Jean Louise, every man's watchman, is his conscience." "There is no such thing as a collective conscious".
"Aunty," she said, cordially, "why don't you go pee in your hat?"
I need a watchman to lead me around and declare what he seeth every hour on the hour.  I need a watchman to tell me this is what a man says but this is what he means, to draw a line down the middle and say here is this justice and there is that justice and make me understand the difference. I need a watchman to go forth and proclaim to them all that twenty-six years is too long to play a joke on anybody, no matter how funny it is.
I was taught never to take advantage of anybody who was less fortunate than myself, whether he be less fortunate in brains, wealth, or social position; it meant anybody, not just Negroes. I was given to understand that the reverse was to be despised. That is the way I was raised, by a black woman and a white man.
I detest the sound of it as much as its matter
Viimeiset sanat
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(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
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This is a first draft of To Kill a Mockingbird that was published after Lee's death. The two books do not constitute a series nor is one a sequel to the other.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

Classic Literature. Fiction. Literature. HTML:

Performed by Reese Witherspoon

#1 New York Times Bestseller

"Go Set a Watchman is such an important book, perhaps the most important novel on race to come out of the white South in decades." New York Times

A landmark novel by Harper Lee, set two decades after her beloved Pulitzer Prizewinning masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird.

Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch"Scout"returns home to Maycomb, Alabama from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise's homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town, and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the pasta journey that can only be guided by one's own conscience.

Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of the late Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor, and effortless precisiona profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context, and new meaning to an American classic.

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