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Go set a watchman: A Novel – tekijä:…
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Go set a watchman: A Novel (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2015; vuoden 2015 painos)

– tekijä: Harper Lee (Autore)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut / Maininnat
7,287399960 (3.34)3 / 293
"Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch -- "Scout"--Returns home from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise's homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in a painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past -- a journey that can be guided only by one's conscience. Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor, and effortless precision -- a profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context, and new meaning to an American classic." -- Book jacket.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:dbreen01
Teoksen nimi:Go set a watchman: A Novel
Kirjailijat:Harper Lee (Autore)
Info:Harper USA (2015), 288 pages
Kokoelmat:Box 8, All Books
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:-

Teostiedot

Kaikki taivaan linnut (tekijä: Harper Lee) (2015)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatdlbkcmo, Thomas.Cannon, Nikkinikster, WardB, hansolo580, laurabeth2000, yksityinen kirjasto, AshleyFratangelo, Bakerbecky, MsStith
  1. 122
    Kuin surmaisi satakielen (tekijä: Harper Lee) (JuliaMaria, KayCliff)
    JuliaMaria: Harper Lee hat nur zwei Bücher veröffentlicht. Das zweite - "Gehe hin, stelle einen Wächter" - erst mit 90 Jahren - auch wenn es schon früher geschrieben wurde. Es war die literarische Sensation des Jahres 2015.
    KayCliff: Go Set a Watchman is the sequel to To Kill a Mocking Bird
  2. 30
    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (tekijä: Mildred D. Taylor) (amanda4242)
  3. 52
    Yksinäinen sydän (tekijä: Carson McCullers) (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Another story of the south by an author with similar background.
  4. 20
    The Optimist's Daughter (tekijä: Eudora Welty) (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Moving and bittersweet, these Southern Gothic novels portray women pushed to their emotional limits as they return home and re-establish old relationships. Both are literary and character-driven, with a thoughtful style that also references mid-twentieth-century events and attitudes.… (lisätietoja)
  5. 10
    The Keepers of the House (tekijä: Shirley Ann Grau) (vwinsloe)
    vwinsloe: Southern values shortly before the civil rights era
  6. 10
    Tongues of flame (tekijä: Mary Ward Brown) (andrewcorser)
    andrewcorser: Further insight into the Southern States
  7. 10
    Four Spirits (tekijä: Sena Jeter Naslund) (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Although Go Set a Watchman takes a more humorous approach than Four Spirits, both novels, set in the mid-twentieth-century South, spotlight the effects of the Civil Rights Movement on individuals. They are captivating, character-driven cameos representing society as a whole.… (lisätietoja)
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englanti (390)  italia (3)  espanja (2)  saksa (2)  norja (1)  hollanti (1)  Kaikki kielet (399)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 399) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
This is not the Atticus we want, but this is the Atticus we need. ( )
  FinallyJones | Nov 17, 2021 |
Go Set a Watchman. Harper Lee. 2015. What a disappointment! I almost didn’t finish this book because I recognized sentences and paragraphs taken directly from To Kill a Mockingbird. Scout comes home from New York City and becomes disillusioned with Atticus because he is involved with a citizen’s group that allowed an avowed and ugly segregationist to speak. She is determined to leave town and never return. Her uncle convinces her to listen to Atticus explain his position which was that integration should be a slow and methodical process. His position didn’t suit Scout and would certainly be considered to be racist today, but it was a common belief among Southern white adults in that era. “A Note from the Publisher” at the end of the book explained that this was her first novel which was returned to her. Truman Capote supposedly helped her turn this book into To Kill a Mockingbird. It took a lot of turning. ( )
  judithrs | Nov 13, 2021 |
A wonderfully written story of the times of the 50s and 60s. I read it as if there was no "To Kill a Mockingbird," but I did enjoy being able to picture in my mind all the characters from "Mockingbird." A great book! ( )
  oobiec | Nov 2, 2021 |
A wonderfully written story of the times of the 50s and 60s. I read it as if there was no "To Kill a Mockingbird," but I did enjoy being able to picture in my mind all the characters from "Mockingbird." A great book! ( )
  oobiec | Nov 2, 2021 |
I'm going to preface this with a disclaimer: it's been years since I last read To Kill a Mockingbird. Probably was some time in high school, so at least eight years (since I did almost no free reading in junior or senior year).

The most important thing to know is that, yes, it's a sequel. Somehow that fact slipped by me--or maybe it was reading a New York Times article that mentioned Harper Lee's original TKAM manuscript that muddled me. It's hard to imagine the crucial plot twist making much sense if you haven't read TKAM, but I do think there's just enough exposition about past events to let someone who only roughly knows TKAM's second act to enjoy this book. Anywho, now that the obvious is done...

I am torn in two directions.

On the one hand, I really liked the style of it--I enjoyed the writing, the easy transitions from casual Maycomb history to wry external commentary to close personal experiences to first person thoughts. No real demarcation of those divisions. The abrupt switches to first person would normally drive me nuts, but I adapted so quickly that I barely noticed.

The humor was spot-on. I'm a complete fool for the so-softly-sarcastic-you-might-think-it's-serious style of writing. The absolute highlights, for me, were the flashbacks to Scout's childhood, though that's probably my love of TKAM showing. They were hilarious and well-placed to reflect on the present action only when you thought about it--otherwise, they could easily seem like random asides.

One odd note: I have a strong memory of there being two "parts" in TKAM. I don't know if this is accurate, but it's something I've remembered/thought I remembered for years...which makes it interesting that GSAW is divided into at least a half dozen "parts". Admittedly, I didn't pay enough attention to each part's beginning to draw conclusions about their importance, though the endings did seem to consistently land with a punch.

I honestly have no memory of Henry Clinton (sort of explained by the fact that he worked all summer) or Uncle Jack, and very little of Aunt Alexandra from TKAM. Nevertheless, I loved how these characters were presented and built in the book.

Now the plot, on the other hand...

First of all, no matter how much space I take up explaining the "bad", this didn't anywhere near keep me from enjoying the romp through an old familiar world. So bear that in mind!

Let's start with the fact that the major "raison d'etre", the key problem, doesn't show up until halfway through the book. Odd, but not bad, especially considering how much I loved the explorations and elaborations of the Maycomb we met in TKAM.

Next, we have heavy-handedness. Jean Louise's/Scout's life changing discovery about Atticus happens not only in the same building, but in the same exact place that she sat to watch him defend Tom in TKAM. The "life lessons" are laid on pretty thick at the end, in large part because they take place in a conversation--fortunately the setup and strong personalities help take some of the sting out of the lecture.

(I'm putting a spoiler tag here, but if you've been reading reviews, you probably know the major plot twist.)

I'm sure you expect my chief complaint to be the retconing of Atticus's character. It's not. In fact, I don't even consider it reconing. I would not find it at all unbelievable that an older white man of considerable privilege in the 1950s South would be racist. I don't even find it unbelievable that this particular character is racist--it's explained in a way that makes sense (though obviously I'll want to reread TKAM to confirm whether it's accurate).

Let me put it this way: I used my Ravenclaw bookmark for this book on a whim and I found it utterly appropriate. The way I see it, in raw thought after a first reading, Atticus is the kind of Ravenclaw that could go bad if JKR wrote Harry Potter today: so focused on the higher-order intellectual ideals of the Constitution and the immediate overwhelming odds the "Negros" face that he neglects the humanity involved. People are so much more complicated than ideas, especially when you try to lump them into as huge a group as a "race". To steal a comparison from an author I'm signing up, Atticus and many Ravenclaws are Apollonian, pursuing order and reason, while a group of people is by its very nature Dionysian: chaotic, changeable, difficult to define. A good piece of art, says Nietzsche, is a balance of the two, and the idea can be applied to a character.

Which brings me to my biggest beef with the book: Jean Louise's "color blindness". I loved her character to bits (despite a few feminist critiques like her lack of life outside Maycomb), but this was a major speed bump. For those of you who don't yet know, colorblindness doesn't exist. It's an ideal invented by privileged white people (most of them probably kind and good-intentioned) that is so far from being attainable in our society right now that it's frankly insulting to insist that you've reached it.

The attitudes that go into racism are so pervasive and pernicious that there's just no way to avoid them. Even if we take it as fact that Jean Louise/Scout ignored everything said about black people by anyone accept her father, his racism still would have bled through to her. Yes, he was equally kind to everyone--but you can be equally kind without behaving equally. The difference would have been subtle, but it would have been enough for an (apparently selectively) impressionable young child: the difference between the way Atticus handled the case of a "white trash" person who he believed had the potential to better themselves in their lifetime and a black person who he believed could only encounter a ceiling, regardless of circumstance, is subtle but real. Any oppressed group can tell you this--even if you don't have your token black friend, you undoubtedly know at least one woman. Heck, just look at the differences in the way Atticus treats Jean Louise and Henry!

Jean Louise is, herself, as much of an Apollonian as her father. Lee goes so far to make this point that she strays right past the suspension of disbelief just so Uncle Jack can point out all the ways that Jean Louise is also as much of a bigot as her father. Which, incidentally, makes me a bigot as well. So be it. My bigotry, if spread, could help save lives.

That's what it all comes down to: This is not a book for our time. The cover flap states that it was written in the 50s, and the book's message is something you wouldn't be surprised to find in a time capsule. But today it's just too raw. We watch the ongoing genocide of black Americans on the news. So what if Atticus himself would never pull the trigger? So what if most people wouldn't? The church shooting in Charleston showed us exactly what that insidiously "innocent" brand of bigotry sows: if no one protests the casual and/or deliberate dehumanization of a large portion of the population, how can you be surprised when one person decides it's okay to treat that group worse than most people would treat animals?

Jean Louise's colorblindness is impossible. Her loud and public rage against the casual acceptance of racism is not. If only Lee's message wasn't one of leveling extremes into acceptance--if only the revelation of Atticus's racism was not so overdone, Jean Louise's wake-up was her realization that she's not colorblind, the moral was not accepting inequality but balancing true equality between Apollonian and Dionysian ideals--this might have been a powerful book for our time. Instead, it's a well-written and engaging sequel that depends on its readers' Atticus- and Jean Louise-like passivity and desire for a neatly ordered ending to deliver its lukewarm moral.
( )
  books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 399) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
And so beneath Atticus’s style of enlightenment is a kind of bigotry that could not recognize itself as such at the time. The historical and human fallacies of the Agrarian ideology hardly need to be rehearsed now, but it should be said that these views were not regarded as ridiculous by intellectuals at the time. Indeed, Jean Louise/Lee herself, though passionately opposed to what her uncle and her father are saying, nevertheless accepts the general terms of the debate as the right ones.
lisäsi danielx | muokkaaNew Yorker, Adam Gopnik (Jul 27, 2015)
 
Go Set a Watchman is a troubling confusion of a novel, politically and artistically, beginning with its fishy origin story. .. I ached for this adult Scout: The civil rights movement may be gathering force, but the second women's movement hasn't happened yet. I wanted to transport Scout to our own time — take her to a performance of Fun Home on Broadway — to know that, if she could only hang on, the possibilities for nonconforming tomboys will open up. Lee herself, writing in the 1950s, lacks the language and social imagination to fully develop this potentially powerful theme.
 
Despite the boldness and bravery of its politics, Go Set a Watchman is a very rough diamond in literary terms … it is a book of enormous literary interest, and questionable literary merit.
 
It is, in most respects, a new work, and a pleasure, revelation and genuine literary event, akin to the discovery of extra sections from T S Eliot’s The Waste Land or a missing act from Hamlet hinting that the prince may have killed his father.
lisäsi Widsith | muokkaaThe Guardian, Mark Lawson (Jul 12, 2015)
 
Watchman is both a painful complication of Harper Lee’s beloved book and a confirmation that a novel read widely by schoolchildren is far more bitter than sweet. Watchman is alienating from the very start.
lisäsi Widsith | muokkaaTime, Daniel D'Addario (Jul 11, 2015)
 

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (4 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Lee, Harperensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Drews, KristiinaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Johansson, EvaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Witherspoon, ReeseKertojamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu

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In memory of Mr. Lee and Alice
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Since Atlanta, she had looked out the dining-car window with a delight almost physical.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
"Every man's island, Jean Louise, every man's watchman, is his conscience." "There is no such thing as a collective conscious".
"Aunty," she said, cordially, "why don't you go pee in your hat?"
I need a watchman to lead me around and declare what he seeth every hour on the hour.  I need a watchman to tell me this is what a man says but this is what he means, to draw a line down the middle and say here is this justice and there is that justice and make me understand the difference. I need a watchman to go forth and proclaim to them all that twenty-six years is too long to play a joke on anybody, no matter how funny it is.
I was taught never to take advantage of anybody who was less fortunate than myself, whether he be less fortunate in brains, wealth, or social position; it meant anybody, not just Negroes. I was given to understand that the reverse was to be despised. That is the way I was raised, by a black woman and a white man.
I detest the sound of it as much as its matter
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

"Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch -- "Scout"--Returns home from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise's homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in a painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past -- a journey that can be guided only by one's conscience. Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor, and effortless precision -- a profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context, and new meaning to an American classic." -- Book jacket.

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