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How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction (2015)

– tekijä: Beth Shapiro

Muut tekijät: Katso muut tekijät -osio.

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1327160,216 (4.05)18
"Could extinct species like mammoths and passenger pigeons be brought back to life? The science says yes. In [this book], Beth Shapiro, evolutionary biologist and pioneer in 'ancient DNA' research, walks readers through the astonishing and controversial process of de-extinction. From deciding which species should be restored, to sequencing their genomes, to anticipating how revived populations might be overseen in the wild, Shapiro vividly explores the extraordinary cutting-edge science that is being used--today--to resurrect the past"--Amazon.com.… (lisätietoja)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 7) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
What a fascinating and thought-provoking book. It covers the science, technology, ethics, and (many!) difficulties of the process of de-extinction. It's a few years old now, but I think very relevant. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the ideas of ecosystem revival, genetic manipulation, and of course conservation. ( )
  SChant | Jun 9, 2020 |
How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction is a book that explains the science behind the de-extinction process and the methodology behind cloning extinct organisms. This is the only book that I have managed to find so far that covers the science of the process and doesn't just discuss all the ethical aspects of this technology. The authorbriefly mentions the ethics, economics, uses and socio-political aspects of de-extinction technology, but this is covered in more detail in the excellent book [b:Resurrection Science: Conservation, De-extinction and the Precarious Future of Wild Things|23848047|Resurrection Science Conservation, De-extinction and the Precarious Future of Wild Things|M.R. O'Connor|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1430945113s/23848047.jpg|43458049]. Resurrection Science and How to Clone a Mammoth compliment each other nicely, and cover the subject in detail up to this point in time.

In this book, Shapiro discusses the purpose of de-extinction and the controversy surrounding this new technology. She also discusses the factors involved in selecting a suitable species for de-extinction; how to find a well preserved specimen so that useful ancient DNA can be obtained, why amber is not a good source of ancient DNA; genome recreation and modification; how to create a clone and the challenges that are encountered with this process; making more of the cloned species; setting the de-extinct population free; and finally, if we should do such a thing.

The book explains the science very well - providing enough details so the reader knows what is going on, but not providing so many minutiae that the reader becomes lost. The author, however, tends to repeat information but the repetitiveness wasn't too annoying. Shapiro is involved with mammoth and dodo de-extinction research, so this book tends to focus on these creatures. However, exciting research and anecdotes from other scientists is also included.

I believe the author has nicely explained her aim in writing this book, namely to provide a road map for de-extinction, beginning with how to decide what species/trait to resurrect, traveling through the circuitous and often confusing path from DNA sequence to living organism, and ending with a discussion about how to manage populations of engineered individuals once they are released into the wild. Shapiro's goal was to explain de-extinction in a way that separates the science form the science-fiction. The author also states that she believes in many cases, de-extinction is scientifically and ethically unjustified. But, she also believes that de-extinction technology has great potential to become an important tool for conserving species and habitats that are currently threatened.

I found this book enjoyable to read and managed to learn a few things in the process. The author also leaves the reader with something to think about.

( )
  ElentarriLT | Mar 24, 2020 |
This is a very interesting subject and very rigorously and thoroughly presented. It makes a case for de-extinction and presents the science behind it as of today diving into the significant complexity of this enterprise in a clear and objective analysis of the issues raised by the possibility of de-extinction. Two main criticisms: The first being that the title has been sexed up to sell more books. As Prof Shapiro makes clear, cloning a mammoth is not ever actually going to happen. The best that can be done is to create a genetically engineered elephant with some mammoth characteristics. The second criticism relates to the inconclusiveness inherent in writing a book on a subject that is developing so quickly. It doesn't quite leave things on a cliff edge but it's not far off and it would be nice to have a subscription channel to keep up with what happens next. ( )
  Philogos | Mar 30, 2019 |
How to clone a Mammoth is a book about the science of de-extinction. The author takes the reader through the current science and answer the questions of what is possible, impossible, and improbable with the science using the projects to resurrect mammoth and passenger pigeons as examples. She answers questions such as is it possible, how is it possible, and if it is should we do just because we can. I think it was a great review of the science that the important questions surrounding it. Shapiro is realistic in her outlook of what the future of de-extinction may look like. I felt like I learned a lot and was able to follow the science presented. There were times, however, that I found myself zoning out reading about some of the genetics (and I have taken a graduate level genetics class) so I am not sure how someone with no background would feel about those passages. ( )
  Cora-R | Jun 20, 2018 |
Last year I received [b: Resurrection Science|23848047|Resurrection Science Conservation, De-extinction and the Precarious Future of Wild Things|M.R. O'Connor|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1430945113s/23848047.jpg|43458049] as an ARC from Netgalley and eagerly devoured it. This book was released around the same time, but I was unable to get my hands on it until the local library carried it. I'm quite happy that I was patient enough to get it, as the book was an incredibly rewarding read.

[b: Resurrection Science|23848047|Resurrection Science Conservation, De-extinction and the Precarious Future of Wild Things|M.R. O'Connor|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1430945113s/23848047.jpg|43458049] focused primarily upon the ethical side of de-extinction. It went into the various types of extinction, their causes, and whether or not bringing them back in an abbreviated fashion - forever in captivity, unable to be reintroduced - is that fair? [b: How to Clone a Mammoth|23364274|How to Clone a Mammoth The Science of de-Extinction|Beth Shapiro|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1416180719s/23364274.jpg|42923637] touched upon these aspects briefly, but failed to really address those aspects of de-extinction in a satisfactory way. Ultimately, however, that is all right. It addressed other aspects of de-extinction quite beautifully.

[b: How to Clone a Mammoth|23364274|How to Clone a Mammoth The Science of de-Extinction|Beth Shapiro|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1416180719s/23364274.jpg|42923637] concerns itself with the scientific and practical aspects of the process. The author, [a: Beth Shapiro|6085145|Beth Shapiro|https://s.gr-assets.com/assets/nophoto/user/u_50x66-632230dc9882b4352d753eedf9396530.png], is intimately involved with Revive & Restore - one of the small number of groups championing de-extinction as a way to revive lost ecosystems and aid in encouraging biodiversity where it has been lost. She goes into detail about the importance of de-extinction on that front, and in turn, how the public often views it differently.

The book is a good work of lay-science, perhaps a bit more sophisticated than [a: Bill Bryson|7|Bill Bryson|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1189096502p2/7.jpg]'s work in [b: A Short History of Nearly Everything|21|A Short History of Nearly Everything|Bill Bryson|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1433086293s/21.jpg|2305997] but nothing that should put a more casual reader off. She covers the more complex science well, but focuses mainly upon dispelling myths and practical solutions to the problems that may arise.

Personally, being deeply interested in de-extinction and believing in it as a possible solution to some environmental problems, I loved the work. While I do see its capacity for causing potential issues, I ultimately think it will be good - particularly when it comes to places like Pleistocene Park. I hope to see many more books tackling these issues in the near future, and look forward to eventual headlines trumpeting the return of the mammoth. Even if it's simply, in truth, only an elephant with some mammoth genes. :) ( )
  Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 7) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä (1 mahdollinen)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Beth Shapiroensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetcalculated
Alejandro, JasonKannen suunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
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Omistuskirjoitus
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For my children, James and Henry, who will inherit whatever mess we make.
Ensimmäiset sanat
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The first use of “de-extinction” was, as far as I can recall, in science fiction.  (Prologue)
A few years ago, a colleague of mine practically bit my head off for getting the end date of the Cretaceous period wrong by a little bit.
Sitaatit
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
The first use of “de-extinction” was, as far as I can recall, in science fiction.  In his 1979 book The Source of Magic, Piers Anthony describes a magician who finds himself in the prescence of cats, which, until that moment, he had believed to be an extinct species.  Anthony writes “[The magician] just stood there and stared at this abrupt de-extinction, unable to form a durable opinion.'  I imagine that this is precisely how many of us might react to our first encounter with a living version of something we thought was extinct.  (Prologue, p. ix)
The year 2013 saw “de-extinction” become its own branch of science, at least accotding to the Times.    Despite this lofty status, there is as yet no consensus as to what the goal of de-extinction science is.  At first it seems obvious.  De-extinction aims to resurrect, via cloning, identical copies of extinct species.  For species that have been extinct for a long time, however – the passenger pigeon, the dodo, the mammoth – cloning is not a viable option.  In the case of these species, de-extinction will have to mean something else.  Most likely, it will mean that specific traits and behaviors of the extinct species will be genetically engineered into living species.  The living species will than gain the adaptations necessary to thrive where the extinct species once did.  Will society, however, respond favorably to de-extinction if the goal is not to bring back an actual mammoth, dodo, or passenger pigeon?  (Prologue, p. x)
Viimeiset sanat
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Erotteluhuomautus
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (4)

"Could extinct species like mammoths and passenger pigeons be brought back to life? The science says yes. In [this book], Beth Shapiro, evolutionary biologist and pioneer in 'ancient DNA' research, walks readers through the astonishing and controversial process of de-extinction. From deciding which species should be restored, to sequencing their genomes, to anticipating how revived populations might be overseen in the wild, Shapiro vividly explores the extraordinary cutting-edge science that is being used--today--to resurrect the past"--Amazon.com.

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