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Girl in a Band – tekijä: Kim Gordon
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Girl in a Band (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2015; vuoden 2015 painos)

– tekijä: Kim Gordon

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
5541532,535 (3.33)13
Kim Gordon, founding member of Sonic Youth, fashion icon, and role model for a generation of women, now tells her story -- a memoir of life as an artist, of music, marriage, motherhood, independence, and as one of the first women of rock and roll. Gordon tells the story of her family, growing up in California in the '60s and '70s, her life in visual art, her move to New York City, the men in her life, her marriage, her relationship with her daughter, her music, and her band. She takes us back to the lost New York of the 1980s and '90s that gave rise to Sonic Youth, and the Alternative revolution in popular music. The band helped build a vocabulary of music -- paving the way for Nirvana, Hole, Smashing Pumpkins and many other acts. But at its core, Girl in a Band examines the route from girl to woman in uncharted territory, music, art career, what partnership means -- and what happens when that identity dissolves.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Tracert
Teoksen nimi:Girl in a Band
Kirjailijat:Kim Gordon
Info:Dey Street Books, Kindle Edition, 293 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:currently-reading

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Girl in a Band (tekijä: Kim Gordon) (2015)

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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 15) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Liked the stuff about the break-up and musings on art/music, but the family history and band/industry details are a snoozefest. Still think she's da coolest, though. ( )
  Jetztzeit | May 15, 2020 |
damn what a spastic account truly all over the place & possibly a story better told not in the aftermath of a divorce but i got what i came for--the hot rock goss, the tips of the trade, & a desire to listen to sonic youth that i have otherwise never in my life had. gordon is better at picking out details about her childhood that don't bore you to death than most biographers but i'd again recommend skimming the opening chapters because they're not very interesting. lots of stuff that could be name-droppy but instead i think kind of results in the creation of a large web that just shows how everything sonic youth touched turned to mildly profitable kool. my fav things i learned from this book--courtney love punched kathleen hanna at lollapalooza 95 (lol), kim writes lyrics for the songs that are written collaboratively to tie everything together & was inspired in part by talky girl groups, billy corgan is a CERTIFIED cry-baby, 911 caused a huge power outage in large swaths of manhattan. uhh what else thurston moore is a cry-baby too? all of these books have wicked accounts of men destroying their instruments like rich toddlers meanwhile i just watched an interview with kelley deal of the breeders last week where she showed off her two guitars, amp, & cab she's owned since the 90s. when my band makes it big folks we're going to end shows by polishing our guitars and putting them back safe and sound into our cases & that's a PROMISE ( )
  freakorlando | May 14, 2020 |
While this book is similar to that which Gordon previously has published, by means of mentioning art, dropping names and quickly going over events and people, this book has something special in that she goes through her marriage breaking apart due to her former husband's infidelity; she writes about it in a very going through the motions way, even when describing her own feelings.

One morning I got up to go to yoga. Thurston was still asleep, and I looked down at his cell. It was then that I saw her texts about their wonderful weekend together, about how much she loved him, and his writing the same things back. It was like a nightmare you don’t ever wake up from. At yoga class I was trembling, and when I came home I confronted him. At first he denied it but I told him I had seen the texts—just like in the movies, only this was painfully real. Thurston claimed that he wanted to break it off. He claimed he wanted to come back to our family. In time I found the e-mails and videos from her on Thurston’s laptop, and the hundreds of text messages between the two of them proudly displayed on our monthly cell phone bill. When I confronted Thurston again, he denied it, then admitted it, then promised things were all over between them. It was a pattern that would happen over and over again. I wanted to believe him. I understood that the cigarettes were a mark of some secrecy between them, a ritual and a taboo that could only happen outside the home when no one else was around.

She writes about Sonic Youth's last gig ever at the very start of the book, which is very heartfelt and a quite horrid read, but really only when framed by the last part of the book, where she pores through the motions of what happened; how Thurston Moore lied to Kim Gordon and everything they had stopped, but started living again (according to him), yet turned out as a hoax.

She tells of her growing up with a paranoid schizophrenic brother who nobody seemed to get was just that, during the psychedelia-lovin' American 1960s.

But she quickly got into art, both the visual side and the musical.

For me performing has a lot to do with being fearless. I wrote an article for Artforum in the mideighties that had a line in it that the rock critic Greil Marcus quoted a lot: “People pay money to see others believe in themselves.” Meaning, the higher the chance you can fall down in public, the more value the culture places on what you do. Unlike, say, a writer or a painter, when you’re onstage you can’t hide from other people, or from yourself either. I’ve spent a lot of time in Berlin, and the Germans have all these great words with multiple meanings inside them. A few visits ago, I came across one of those words, Maskenfreiheit. It means “the freedom conferred by masks.”

She writes plainly lovely sometimes, in amidst all of the namedropping and hurt:

WRITING ABOUT NEW YORK is hard. Not because memories intersect and overlap, because of course they do. Not because incidents and times mix with others, because that happens too. Not because I didn’t fall in love with New York, because even though I was lonely and poor, no place had ever made me feel more at home. It is because knowing what I know now, it’s hard to write about a love story with a broken heart.

On thinking back when she met Moore, before 27 years of marriage ended:

Today, when I think back on the early days and months of Thurston’s and my relationship, I wonder whether you can truly love, or be loved back, by someone who hides who they are. It’s made me question my whole life and all my other relationships. Why did I trust him, or assume I knew anything at all about him? Maybe I imposed on Thurston a dream, a fantasy. When I look back at old photos of us, I have to believe we were happy, at least as happy as any two creative people who are stressed out with commitments and fears about the future and what’s next, and about their own ideas and inner demons, ever can be.

And quoting a friend on what being in a band is not:

As J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr. liked to say when asked about being in a band, “It’s not fun. It’s not about having fun.”

What is fun, however, is mainly when Gordon writes about the band creating stuff:

Gary Gersh, our A&R guy at Geffen, was disappointed when we chose a black-and-white Raymond Pettibon drawing for the cover of Goo. I’m sure he was hoping for a glamorous picture of the band, something very of the moment, with me front and center. Raymond’s drawings had been slapped on record covers for many bands on the SST label, especially Black Flag’s. We loved Ray’s zines and drawings and in the mideighties I had written about his work in Artforum; the black-and-white cover was based on the couple in Terrence Malick’s film Badlands, while the inside was colorful, a riot of faux-glam goofiness.


..and:

In the video for “100%” I wore a bootleg Rolling Stones shirt that said “Eat Me.” As a result, MTV, which showed any number of videos of naked women grinding away, was reluctant to run ours. They felt my shirt sent a bad message to viewers. After the band signed with Geffen, a story came out about an executive there who had sexually harassed his secretary. That was the inspiration for “Swimsuit Issue.” I found it strange that Geffen, like a lot of companies, had a “Secretary’s Day,” but secretaries never seemed to get promoted to anything above that level. The song was meant to spotlight that hypocrisy.

And Moore. Over and over:

Later someone showed me a comment posted on the Sonic Youth website. “She looks like a hot little number,” a fan wrote in. He must have seen a photo of the two of them on some website, or picked up on the gossip going around. He added, “Kim beware, men are pigs after all and more affairs happen at work than any other arena.” Finally, the fan wrote, in a catchphrase he took from The Dark Knight, the second of director Christopher Nolan’s three Batman movies, “Some men just want to watch the world burn.” A few months later, around Coco’s seventeenth birthday, I found out Thurston had seen her again, at a concert he played in Europe, though he had promised his therapist that if she showed up again or contacted him, he would call his doctor and tell me, too. He did neither. I went back to checking his e-mail, where I found several short, porno-like videos that she had sent him. Thurston denied ever responding to them, but sometime after that I found an e-mail he’d drafted to her with a photo of him attached. Maybe he didn’t send it because his vanity got the better of him, or maybe he wanted me to find it. I asked him to move out of the house. The official announcement of our breakup was timed so we could sit down and tell Coco before the news hit the Internet and strangers started discussing our lives. The web is trouble enough, especially when you’re in your senior year of high school and stressed out about college. Even though Thurston and I had separated in August, so far we hadn’t made any public statements, but people were starting to speculate. It didn’t stop Coco from being angry with me for not telling her sooner. Kids believe everything is a family matter and that they should have an equal vote or some control over everything that goes on in their family’s lives. And being a teenager makes everyone doubly self-conscious. We had already more than ruined her senior year of high school. As she had told us, we couldn’t possibly know what it was like to have us for parents. I did feel some compassion for Thurston, and I still do. I was sorry for the way he had lost his marriage, his band, his daughter, his family, our life together—and himself. But that is a lot different from forgiveness.

All in all: a trip through music and love and disaster and building yourself back together; it's an honest trip, but should have been a little more constrained and without all of that name-dropping, but then again, it wouldn't have been Moore's story without that. ( )
1 ääni pivic | Mar 20, 2020 |
This book was both a joy & painful to read, but that's what you get from an honest memoir I guess.
  roniweb | May 30, 2019 |
This was all right. I think it was done too close to the divorce because the hurt is there and real so you lose a lot of her life as a member of Sonic Youth and the good of working with Moore. Not that she is wrong to have the hurt, God knows, but I think it means she has a certain perspective on her life she may not in even 5 years. ( )
1 ääni jeninmotion | Sep 24, 2018 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 15) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä (1 mahdollinen)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Gordon, Kimensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
CHIPSKannen suunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Double, StevePhotographer, front covermuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Smirnova, AlisaPhotographer, back covermuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Szafranski, Paula RussellSuunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu

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Kim Gordon, founding member of Sonic Youth, fashion icon, and role model for a generation of women, now tells her story -- a memoir of life as an artist, of music, marriage, motherhood, independence, and as one of the first women of rock and roll. Gordon tells the story of her family, growing up in California in the '60s and '70s, her life in visual art, her move to New York City, the men in her life, her marriage, her relationship with her daughter, her music, and her band. She takes us back to the lost New York of the 1980s and '90s that gave rise to Sonic Youth, and the Alternative revolution in popular music. The band helped build a vocabulary of music -- paving the way for Nirvana, Hole, Smashing Pumpkins and many other acts. But at its core, Girl in a Band examines the route from girl to woman in uncharted territory, music, art career, what partnership means -- and what happens when that identity dissolves.

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