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The Wright Company: From Invention to Industry

Tekijä: Edward J. Roach

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1021,825,343 (4)3
"In the fall of 1909 Wilbur and Orville Wright decided the time was right to begin manufacturing their airplanes for sale. Backed by Wall Street tycoons, including August Belmont, Cornelius Vanderbilt III, and Andrew Freedman, the brothers formed the Wright Company. The Wright Company trained hundreds of early aviators at its flight schools, including Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot credited with shooting down Manfred von Richtofen -- the "Red Baron"-- during the First World War; and Hap Arnold, the commander of the U.S. Army Air Forces during the Second World War. Pilots with the company's exhibition department thrilled crowds at events from Winnipeg to Boston, Corpus Christi to Colorado Springs. Cal Rodgers flew a Wright Company airplane in pursuit of the $50,000 Hearst Aviation Prize in 1911. But all was not well in Dayton, a city that hummed with industry, producing cash registers, railroad cars, and many other products. The brothers found it hard to transition from running their own bicycle business to being corporate executives responsible for other people's money. Their dogged pursuit of enforcement of their 1906 patent -- especially against Glenn Curtiss and his company -- helped hold back the development of the U.S. aviation industry. When Orville Wright sold the company in 1915, more than three years after his brother's death, he was a comfortable man -- but his company had built only 120 airplanes at its Dayton factory and Wright Company products were not in the U.S. arsenal as war continued in Europe. Edward Roach provides a window into the legendary Wright Company, its place in Dayton, its management struggles, and its effects on early U.S. aviation"-- "Fresh from successful flights before royalty in Europe, and soon after thrilling hundreds of thousands of people by flying around the Statue of Liberty, in the fall of 1909 Wilbur and Orville Wright decided the time was right to begin manufacturing their airplanes for sale. Backed by Wall Street tycoons, including August Belmont, Cornelius Vanderbilt III, and Andrew Freedman, the brothers formed the Wright Company. The Wright Company trained hundreds of early aviators at its flight schools, including Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot credited with shooting down Manfred von Richtofen -- the "Red Baron"-- during the First World War; and Hap Arnold, the commander of the U.S. Army Air Forces during the Second World War. Pilots with the company's exhibition department thrilled crowds at events from Winnipeg to Boston, Corpus Christi to Colorado Springs. Cal Rodgers flew a Wright Company airplane in pursuit of the $50,000 Hearst Aviation Prize in 1911. But all was not well in Dayton, a city that hummed with industry, producing cash registers, railroad cars, and many other products. The brothers found it hard to transition from running their own bicycle business to being corporate executives responsible for other people's money. Their dogged pursuit of enforcement of their 1906 patent -- especially against Glenn Curtiss and his company -- helped hold back the development of the U.S. aviation industry. When Orville Wright sold the company in 1915, more than three years after his brother's death, he was a comfortable man -- but his company had built only 120 airplanes at its Dayton factory and Wright Company products were not in the U.S. arsenal as war continued in Europe. Edward Roach provides a fascinating window into the legendary Wright Company, its place in Dayton, its management struggles, and its effects on early U.S. aviation"--… (lisätietoja)
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näyttää 2/2
A look at the company the Wright brothers formed in 1909 to manufacture airplanes and defend their 1906 patent. Wilbur was the driving force behind the company and after his death in 1912 Orville took over but never displayed the commitment and focus shown by his brother. Three years later he sold the company to investors. The book is a more academic look at the company and also the life and times of the brothers, Dayton and the early aviation industry. It is reasonably well written but a bit repetitive at times and somewhat dry. ( )
  jztemple | Apr 18, 2023 |
Although there are aspects of this monograph that are rather dry, the more one progresses in the story the more this adventure in entrepreneurship becomes a comedy of manners. This is between the Wright Brothers not really having the skills to run a sizeable industrial operation, to the East Coast investors who saw themselves as building a new technological empire, and the mutual incomprehension between the two parties, which was really never bridged; the Wrights being unwilling to cede effective control of the shop floor to men like Grover Loening (who eventually became a noted aircraft builder in their own right).

Apart from that there is the whole issue of the Wrights patent wars with the rest of the embryonic American aviation industry, particularly Glenn Curtiss, a man who was much more simpatico with the East Coast business community. The real issue with the patent war from the perspective of the Wright Company's viability as a business, is that the Wrights were reluctant to change their aircraft, so as to not invalidate their patents, so they lost ground to manufacturers who had to innovate to avoid getting tangled in litigation. In the end, Orville Wright seems relieved when he allowed himself to be bought out, and get away from the stress of it all. ( )
  Shrike58 | Sep 1, 2022 |
näyttää 2/2
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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"In the fall of 1909 Wilbur and Orville Wright decided the time was right to begin manufacturing their airplanes for sale. Backed by Wall Street tycoons, including August Belmont, Cornelius Vanderbilt III, and Andrew Freedman, the brothers formed the Wright Company. The Wright Company trained hundreds of early aviators at its flight schools, including Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot credited with shooting down Manfred von Richtofen -- the "Red Baron"-- during the First World War; and Hap Arnold, the commander of the U.S. Army Air Forces during the Second World War. Pilots with the company's exhibition department thrilled crowds at events from Winnipeg to Boston, Corpus Christi to Colorado Springs. Cal Rodgers flew a Wright Company airplane in pursuit of the $50,000 Hearst Aviation Prize in 1911. But all was not well in Dayton, a city that hummed with industry, producing cash registers, railroad cars, and many other products. The brothers found it hard to transition from running their own bicycle business to being corporate executives responsible for other people's money. Their dogged pursuit of enforcement of their 1906 patent -- especially against Glenn Curtiss and his company -- helped hold back the development of the U.S. aviation industry. When Orville Wright sold the company in 1915, more than three years after his brother's death, he was a comfortable man -- but his company had built only 120 airplanes at its Dayton factory and Wright Company products were not in the U.S. arsenal as war continued in Europe. Edward Roach provides a window into the legendary Wright Company, its place in Dayton, its management struggles, and its effects on early U.S. aviation"-- "Fresh from successful flights before royalty in Europe, and soon after thrilling hundreds of thousands of people by flying around the Statue of Liberty, in the fall of 1909 Wilbur and Orville Wright decided the time was right to begin manufacturing their airplanes for sale. Backed by Wall Street tycoons, including August Belmont, Cornelius Vanderbilt III, and Andrew Freedman, the brothers formed the Wright Company. The Wright Company trained hundreds of early aviators at its flight schools, including Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot credited with shooting down Manfred von Richtofen -- the "Red Baron"-- during the First World War; and Hap Arnold, the commander of the U.S. Army Air Forces during the Second World War. Pilots with the company's exhibition department thrilled crowds at events from Winnipeg to Boston, Corpus Christi to Colorado Springs. Cal Rodgers flew a Wright Company airplane in pursuit of the $50,000 Hearst Aviation Prize in 1911. But all was not well in Dayton, a city that hummed with industry, producing cash registers, railroad cars, and many other products. The brothers found it hard to transition from running their own bicycle business to being corporate executives responsible for other people's money. Their dogged pursuit of enforcement of their 1906 patent -- especially against Glenn Curtiss and his company -- helped hold back the development of the U.S. aviation industry. When Orville Wright sold the company in 1915, more than three years after his brother's death, he was a comfortable man -- but his company had built only 120 airplanes at its Dayton factory and Wright Company products were not in the U.S. arsenal as war continued in Europe. Edward Roach provides a fascinating window into the legendary Wright Company, its place in Dayton, its management struggles, and its effects on early U.S. aviation"--

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