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Robot Uprisings

Tekijä: Daniel H. Wilson (Toimittaja), John Joseph Adams (Toimittaja)

Muut tekijät: Jeff Abbott (Avustaja), Julianna Baggott (Avustaja), Ernest Cline (Avustaja), Cory Doctorow (Avustaja), Alan Dean Foster (Avustaja)11 lisää, Hugh Howey (Avustaja), John McCarthy (Avustaja), Ian McDonald (Avustaja), Seanan McGuire (Avustaja), Anna North (Avustaja), Nnedi Okorafor (Avustaja), Alastair Reynolds (Avustaja), Scott Sigler (Avustaja), Genevieve Valentine (Avustaja), Robin Wasserman (Avustaja), Charles Yu (Avustaja)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1916145,309 (3.48)5
"As real robots creep into our lives, so does a sense of fear--we have all wondered what horrifying scenarious might unfold if our technology were to go awry. This anthology brings to life the half-formed questions and fears we all have about the machines we live with. With contributions by Alan Dean Foster, Charles Yu, Hugh Howey, Daniel H. Wilson, Corey Doctorow, Ian McDonald, Ernie Cline, Jeff Abbott, Robin Wasserman, and Anna North, Robot Uprisings contains meticulously described, exhilarating trips to futures in which humans can only survive by being more clever and tenacious than the rebellious machines they have unwittingly created"--… (lisätietoja)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 6) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)

Complex God (Scott Sigler) - This is typical Sigler, he presents a well thought-out story and tries (successfully) to make it fit inside of a science-realistic framework. Predictable, but more than worth it!

Cycles (Charles Yu) - Almost a love story... but in reverse. It was a good filler, but written well enough that I'd read something longer by him.

Lullaby (Anna North) - This one was really good. It read like a horror story and reminded me of early Stephen King. Great story elements!

Eighty Miles an Hour All The Way to Paradise (Genevieve Valentine) - This was a great edge-of-your-seat read. Very walking dead-ish. Character driven with internal monologue.

Executable (Hugh Howey) - I love Hugh Howey's writing, it is always engaging and compelling and this is no exception. Very Lord of the Flies like... if a short story can be that. Always pregnant with possibilities.

The Onmibot Incident (Ernest Cline) - I have to admit that this is my least favorite (so far) of the collection. Not because I didn't like it, because I did really enjoy it. I think Cline is a colorful writer who can weave a story that keeps you guessing and never bores you. This is a touching story that has the nostalgia Cline readers have come to expect and the levity that continues to impress me (clever, not kitsch). However I feel it is a little out of place with the rest of the stories in this book.

Epoch (Corey Doctorow) - Corey is almost incapable of writing anything less than great! He has a lyrical quality and his writing has a cadence of its own. This story, like most of his, explores the human condition and how it relates to the technology all around us. Does art imitate life? Does life imitate art? or does art imitate life imitation art?

Human Intelligence (Jeff Abbott) - This was pretty good, I really liked it. The internal struggle between individual survival and survival of the species. I love this type of dystopian trope.

The Golden Hour (Julianna Baggott) - I thought this was a little confusing and unrealistic... maybe trying too hard or something. There are a lot of literary references which were fun but the story lacked believability or maybe the robots were just too human? I didn't hate it, I just didn't love it.

Sleepover (Alastair Reynolds) - I really liked this one. It had a bit of a "Pacific Rim" quality to it coupled with Silo by Hugh Howey (Read this series NOW). Very visual writing and there was a lot of information in a very short story but it never felt rushed or overwhelming.

Seasoning (Alan Dean Foster) - This one was very interesting... a paranoia inducing story bringing in elements of nonobots and anti-GMO and conspiracy theory. Very classic Sci-Fi

Nanonauts! In Battle with Tiny Death-Subs! (Ian McDonald) - Just a day in the life of a microscopic biological drone pilot. Very character driven and good development but at times went too far into the weeds.

Of Dying Heroes and Deathless Deeds (Robin Wasserman) - This one was just ok. I think it was a lot longer than it needed to be. Basically a human "shrink" for battle weary robots. It just seemed unrealistic to me so maybe I just couldn't get into it enough to enjoy the writing?

The Robot and the Baby (John McCarthy) - This one was pretty thought provoking. Reliance on technology until our technology starts to have more humanity than we do. We desire the easy life and become angry when we are burdened with things like childcare and eventually technology begins to develop those emotional ties that we no longer do.

We Are All Misfit Toys in the Aftermath of the Velveteen War (Seanan McGuire) - This was strange... not bad at all, but I did have a little trouble immersing myself in it. Basically we are at war with robots because they kidnapped our children but try to keep them from growing up because we tried keeping children away from the robots.So now all adults are in PTSD counseling.

Spider the Artist (Nnedi Okorafor) - I really liked this one a lot! It was very well written and thought provoking. Man vs machine and where we differ... but are also alike.

Small Things (Daniel H. Wilson) - Daniel Wilson continues to impress me, he is so detailed without being boring, and comes up with such original ideas and new ways to think about old stories. His characters and unique and real and make decisions with consequences. This is more a story of technology and unintended consequences than it is of a robot uprising... But it was a very enjoyable, albeit disturbing, story.
( )
  philibin | Mar 25, 2024 |
There seems to be a lot of books coming out now with the theme of robots rising up and taking over some or all of the world. This book of short stories has this terrifying theme at its heart too, with the different authors developing a range of different ideas, from all out war, to the children’s toys taking them away from the adults, to nanobots that are capable of modifying the actual genetics of people.

As with all collections, there are the good and the bad. One of my favourites was the one by Alistair Reynolds, and one of my least by Alan Dean Foster. But what really came across was that startlingly different and frightening dystopian futures that these authors could imagine with the rise of AI and robots. Solid set of stories, and worth reading it you want to be ever so slightly scared by the future. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
I picked this up at Steampunk World's Fair a few years back, but hadn't gotten around to reading it until now. I'm glad I finally did! Like any short story collection, it has a mix of gems and duds. Here are some stories that stood out to me:

* "Eighty Miles an Hour All the Way to Paradise" (Genevieve Valentine) is a haunting post-apocalyptic tale about survival, and who we pick up along the way, and being left behind.
* "Epoch" (Cory Doctorow) has an interesting take on a rogue A.I. from a sysadmin's point of view.
* "The Golden Hour" (Juliana Baggott) features an unlikely rebel and a ray of hope in a capricious and regimented world.
* "Sleepover" (Alastair Reynolds) has a downright unsympathetic protagonist, but it's got an evocative setting, and a really interesting take on an old philosophical idea.
* "Of Dying Heroes and Deathless Deeds" (Robin Wasserman) is a tragic exploration of trauma, ambiguous moral choices, and poetry.
* "The Robot and the Baby" (John McCarthy) is a short, fun piece that I like because its wacky robot behavior is grounded in realistic computer programming. (Not surprising, perhaps, since the author invented the original Lisp programming language.) Note however that it does feature a rather unfortunate stereotype of a "crack mother".
* "We Are All Misfit Toys in the Aftermath of the Velveteen War" (Seanan McGuire) is a sorrowful tale about fading hope, callousness, and unintended consequences. It also features a clever use of a technology that isn't usually depicted in fiction.
* "Small Things" (Daniel H. Wilson) unfurls a horrifying apocalyptic wonderland at the same time it gradually reveals more about the protagonist's tragic backstory. It's a well-crafted gem of glittering terror. ( )
  lavaturtle | Feb 4, 2018 |
This was a solid anthology. Not for those uninterested in robots (as the title would suggest). The Wilson story is a bit drawn out and frankly disappointing. The highlight for me was the Jeff Abbott story. ( )
  kallai7 | Mar 23, 2017 |
Robot Uprisings
Daniel H. Wilson and John Joseph Adams

I picked up a copy of this book as soon as it came out. I'm a big fan of Daniel H. Wilson and appreciate his take on the possible path our future with technology may take. His previous book Robopocalypse and Amped were two I enjoyed greatly, even if it does seem that the author has more sympathy or connection to his robot characters than his human ones at times!

Personally, despite being raised on Terminator....or maybe because I was raised on Terminator, when I thought of that A.I. moment it was always a cyborg, or a small military machine. I never actually imagined the various ways which our lives could be completely taken over by the little things, the things we walk past every day. Two examples shown in this anthology that forced me to change my mindset, include the machines that make our foods adding additives that makes us slow and forgetful or car that are guided and controlled by their GPS system. One is passive and non threatening whilst the other could not be more horrifying. Either way after finishing, it certainly seems we have left ourselves wide open.

You think not? Imagine a panicked phone message from a relative telling you to meet at a certain place, an elevator imploring you to evacuate the building and then letting you drop or your children's favourite toy suddenly deciding it does not like being told what to do and asking it to follow them somewhere special. Jeez it gives me the willies just thinking about it.

Each story in this collection examines a different element of this techno uprising and without spoiling anything you may never find yourself looking at your office or home in the same way again.

If you have not read Daniel H. Wilsons book Robopocolypse this is an excellent lead in. The fact that Steven Spielberg has signed on to direct the film adaptation should give you some confidence. ( )
  areadingmachine | Aug 19, 2014 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 6) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (1 mahdollinen)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Wilson, Daniel H.Toimittajaensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Adams, John JosephToimittajapäätekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Abbott, JeffAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Baggott, JuliannaAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Cline, ErnestAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Doctorow, CoryAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Foster, Alan DeanAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Howey, HughAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
McCarthy, JohnAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
McDonald, IanAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
McGuire, SeananAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
North, AnnaAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Okorafor, NnediAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Reynolds, AlastairAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Sigler, ScottAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Valentine, GenevieveAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Wasserman, RobinAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Yu, CharlesAvustajamuu tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

"As real robots creep into our lives, so does a sense of fear--we have all wondered what horrifying scenarious might unfold if our technology were to go awry. This anthology brings to life the half-formed questions and fears we all have about the machines we live with. With contributions by Alan Dean Foster, Charles Yu, Hugh Howey, Daniel H. Wilson, Corey Doctorow, Ian McDonald, Ernie Cline, Jeff Abbott, Robin Wasserman, and Anna North, Robot Uprisings contains meticulously described, exhilarating trips to futures in which humans can only survive by being more clever and tenacious than the rebellious machines they have unwittingly created"--

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