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Arctic Summer (2014)

– tekijä: Damon Galgut

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
2221393,019 (3.88)43
In 1912, the SS Birmingham approaches India. On board is Morgan Forster, novelist and man of letters, who is embarking on a journey of discovery. As Morgan stands on deck, the promise of a strange new future begins to take shape before his eyes. The seeds of a story start to gather at the corner of his mind: a sense of impending menace, lust in close confines, under a hot, empty sky. It will be another 12 years, and a second time spent in India, before 'A Passage to India', E.M. Forster's great work of literature, is published. During these years, Morgan will come to a profound understanding of himself as a man, and of the infinite subtleties and complexity of the human nature, bringing these great insights to bear in his remarkable novel.… (lisätietoja)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 13) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
The long is: I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I'm the contrary case. This was the only Galgut I hadn't read when I picked it up in London a year or more ago. On the other hand, I've never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story 'The Machine Stops'.

So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn't even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio-novel. I was crestfallen. I have a historian's distaste for bio-pics, biography, autobiography. Why would a bio-novel be any different? What is it? Some excuse to write a biography without doing the hard work? Without having to bother with the facts? Back on the shelf it sat, and sat. And sat. Until the other day when I came upon it soon after an experience which had given me a different perspective on this sort of book. I read Infinity: The Story of a Moment by Gabriel Josipovici, read it, loved it, and only subsequently discovered it was a bio-novel.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/arctic-summer-by-damon-ga...
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
The long is: I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I'm the contrary case. This was the only Galgut I hadn't read when I picked it up in London a year or more ago. On the other hand, I've never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story 'The Machine Stops'.

So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn't even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio-novel. I was crestfallen. I have a historian's distaste for bio-pics, biography, autobiography. Why would a bio-novel be any different? What is it? Some excuse to write a biography without doing the hard work? Without having to bother with the facts? Back on the shelf it sat, and sat. And sat. Until the other day when I came upon it soon after an experience which had given me a different perspective on this sort of book. I read Infinity: The Story of a Moment by Gabriel Josipovici, read it, loved it, and only subsequently discovered it was a bio-novel.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/arctic-summer-by-damon-ga...
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
The long is: I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I'm the contrary case. This was the only Galgut I hadn't read when I picked it up in London a year or more ago. On the other hand, I've never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story 'The Machine Stops'.

So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn't even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio-novel. I was crestfallen. I have a historian's distaste for bio-pics, biography, autobiography. Why would a bio-novel be any different? What is it? Some excuse to write a biography without doing the hard work? Without having to bother with the facts? Back on the shelf it sat, and sat. And sat. Until the other day when I came upon it soon after an experience which had given me a different perspective on this sort of book. I read Infinity: The Story of a Moment by Gabriel Josipovici, read it, loved it, and only subsequently discovered it was a bio-novel.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/arctic-summer-by-damon-ga...
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
I grabbed this book from the library in my usual, arbitrary way: I liked the spine and the binding, and the cover; then I saw it was a Europa Edition and decided to check it out. Then I never got around to reading it, and had forgotten about it until noticing it on my Overdrive wishlist.

Arctic Summer is biographical novel of English novelist E.M. Forster; it's mostly about Morgan's desperate search for love and companionship and sex, and how he basically didn't get those things. It's gorgeous and emotional and restrained, and I loved every word.

Overwhelmingly, this novel is just bittersweet. Morgan is so sweetly likeable (I know it's trendy these days to want unlikable characters, but there's something to be said for characters you also just want to squish) but his life so empty despite the people, jobs, and travel that fill it. He finds some intense emotional relationships, a few that translate into physical/sexual ones, but all seem lopsided and unequal -- some, because the other man is not as interested; some, because of racial and class inequalities.

Morgan's yearning for companionship just hit me so hard; despite all the changes legally and socially in some parts of the world, queer folks still can't live freely and openly. I'm lucky in my life that I haven't lost anything in being open with the person I love -- but it's easy to imagine a world in which I didn't have that luxury.

Galgut draws from a wealth of source material, and apparently includes real quotes -- slightly amended -- in the text, a technique I didn't notice, and the narrative reads beautifully. Every other line is quote-worthy; despite the slim size of this read, I kept pausing to meditate and chew over the story.

I'm genuinely sad having finished it; not just because I've ended a good read but because I ache for Morgan. I want a few more pages where he is not just fine -- because he is fine -- but where he is stupidly, insanely happy. ( )
  unabridgedchick | Sep 6, 2017 |
Edward Morgan (EM) Forster achieved fame as a novelist, writer of a series of books that looked at the mores of the English. Morgan (as he was known) had a more complex private life. Morgan was born and brought up in comfortable circumstances, well-educated and flirting with writing whilst not gainfully employed and living with his mother. He took on the role of a tutor to young Indian man, in England for education, and his life came into focus. Morgan falls in love and confronts his sexuality, despite rejection he forms a close friendship that spans many years. Morgan spends the war in Alexandria and begins his first real affair with a local man but his writing is on hold. His subsequent visits to India shape his writing and his relationships.

It is difficult to place this book, it is not a pure biography but neither is it fiction, much of the dialogue is taken from diaries and contemporaneous accounts but much is also imagined. In fact this book reads like a novel and is much the better for it. Galgut is an accomplished writer and the story is believable for anyone who doesn't know the life and works of E M Forster. ( )
1 ääni pluckedhighbrow | Jun 26, 2017 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 13) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
lisäsi gsc55 | muokkaaReviews by Amos Lassen (Jul 26, 2014)
 
Includes YouTube interview with Flametta Rocco of The Economist
lisäsi gsc55 | muokkaaBand of Thebes (May 9, 2014)
 
Arctic Summer largely concerns the interval between the conception of A Passage to India and the novel’s publication. Galgut gamely represents the social and political climate in England on either side of the war, but his main interest lies in Forster’s experiences abroad: both his sexual encounters and the web of race and class in which he found himself caught. The novel draws on his letters and diaries, quoting them directly and re-creating episodes they describe. Galgut weaves scenes and phrases from A Passage to India throughout Arctic Summer in an attempt (as he explains in his acknowledgements) to “suggest the wide range of sources from which Forster may have drawn his material”. Suggestion is one thing, but such literal correspondence feels contrived – as do laborious explanations of how Forster translated his experiences into fiction.
 
There have been several biographies of E.M. Forster, one of the most delicate British novelists of the 20th century. He was a middle-class intellectual, a peripheral member of the Bloomsbury group, an honorary Cambridge fellow and a spinsterish bachelor. He was awarded the prestigious Order of Merit (there are only 24 at any one time), but his public life shrouded his secret homosexuality and, with it, a longing for the exotic East. In “Arctic Summer” Damon Galgut, an openly gay South African novelist, has fictionalised Forster’s most fruitful period as a writer and his years of sexual discovery.
lisäsi kidzdoc | muokkaaThe Economist (Mar 1, 2014)
 
EM Forster began the novel he called Arctic Summer in 1909, on the heels of three others that had brought him considerable renown as a writer. He would go on to publish Howards End in 1910, and 14 years later, A Passage to India. His final novel, Maurice, about love between men in a repressed, homophobic England, would come out posthumously. But Arctic Summer would never be finished, its mysterious, moody title evoking instead the uncertainties about writing, sexuality, relationships and empire that racked Forster's life, especially during the long stretch between Howards End and A Passage to India.

Forster could not, of course, have known the fate of his unfinished novel when he began writing it. Nor could he have foreseen the resurrection of his title, more than a century later, in the hands of the South African writer Damon Galgut, who uses it, in clear homage and affection, for his own novel about Forster's stasis and transformation during those years.
 
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
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Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
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Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
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"Orgies are so important, and they are things one knows nothing about"

E.M. Forster to P.N. Furbank, 1953
Omistuskirjoitus
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To Riyaz Ahmad Mir and to the fourteen years of our friendship
Ensimmäiset sanat
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In October of 1912, the SS City of Birmingham was travelling through the Red Sea, midway on her journey to India, when two men found themselves together on the forward deck.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
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Canonical DDC/MDS

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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

-

In 1912, the SS Birmingham approaches India. On board is Morgan Forster, novelist and man of letters, who is embarking on a journey of discovery. As Morgan stands on deck, the promise of a strange new future begins to take shape before his eyes. The seeds of a story start to gather at the corner of his mind: a sense of impending menace, lust in close confines, under a hot, empty sky. It will be another 12 years, and a second time spent in India, before 'A Passage to India', E.M. Forster's great work of literature, is published. During these years, Morgan will come to a profound understanding of himself as a man, and of the infinite subtleties and complexity of the human nature, bringing these great insights to bear in his remarkable novel.

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